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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10408
Sophocles, Ajax, 52-54


nanIt was I who prevented him, by casting over his eyes oppressive notions of his fatal joy, and I who turned his fury aside on the flocks of sheep and the confused droves guarded by herdsmen, the spoil which you had not yet divided.


nanIt was I who prevented him, by casting over his eyes oppressive notions of his fatal joy, and I who turned his fury aside on the flocks of sheep and the confused droves guarded by herdsmen, the spoil which you had not yet divided.


nanIt was I who prevented him, by casting over his eyes oppressive notions of his fatal joy, and I who turned his fury aside on the flocks of sheep and the confused droves guarded by herdsmen, the spoil which you had not yet divided.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.155-2.182 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.155. /Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.156. /Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.157. /Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.158. /Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.159. /Then would the Argives have accomplished their return even beyond what was ordained, had not Hera spoken a word to Athena, saying:Out upon it, child of Zeus that beareth the aegis, unwearied one! Is it thus indeed that the Argives are to flee to their dear native land over the broad back of the sea? 2.160. /Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man 2.161. /Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man 2.162. /Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man 2.163. /Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man 2.164. /Aye, and they would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans; with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man 2.165. /neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel 2.166. /neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel 2.167. /neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel 2.168. /neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel 2.169. /neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So spake she, and the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, failed not to hearken. Down from the peaks of Olympus she went darting, and speedily came to the swift ships of the Achaeans. There she found Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel 2.170. /as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.171. /as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.172. /as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.173. /as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.174. /as he stood. He laid no hand upon his benched, black ship, for that grief had come upon his heart and soul; and flashing-eyed Athene stood near him, and said:Son of Laërtes, sprung from Zeus, Odysseus of many wiles, is it thus indeed that ye will fling yourselves 2.175. /on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.176. /on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.177. /on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.178. /on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.179. /on your benched ships to flee to your dear native land? Aye, and ye would leave to Priam and the Trojans their boast, even Argive Helen, for whose sake many an Achaean hath perished in Troy, far from his dear native land. But go thou now throughout the host of the Achaeans, and hold thee back no more; 2.180. /and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. 2.181. /and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him. 2.182. /and with thy gentle words seek thou to restrain every man, neither suffer them to draw into the sea their curved ships. So said she, and he knew the voice of the goddess as she spake, and set him to run, and cast from him his cloak, which his herald gathered up, even Eurybates of Ithaca, that waited on him.
2. Hymn To Dionysus, To Dionysus, 7.14 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

7.14. whom he called to him by their names, and commended them before the company, and rejoiced in them in the same manner as a man would have rejoiced in his own exploits. He also put on their heads crowns of gold, and golden ornaments about their necks, and gave them long spears of gold, and ensigns that were made of silver 7.14. for many of them were so made, that they were on three or even four stories, one above another. The magnificence also of their structure afforded one both pleasure and surprise;
3. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 8.23, 8.26-8.27 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Alcestis, 65-71, 64 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

64. Ah! kind companion of my bondage, for such thou art to her, who, erst thy queen, is now sunk in misery; what are they doing? What new schemes are they devising in their eagerness to take away my wretched life? Maid
5. Euripides, Bacchae, 14-19, 212, 220, 247, 438-440, 449, 453, 455-460, 464-490, 769, 894, 13 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Hecuba, 36-50, 35 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

35. πάντες δ' ̓Αχαιοὶ ναῦς ἔχοντες ἥσυχοι 35. Meanwhile all the Achaeans sit idly here in their ships at the shores of Thrace ; for the son of Peleus, Achilles, appeared above his tomb and stopped the whole army of Hellas , as they were making straight for home across the sea
7. Euripides, Hippolytus, 21 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Euripides, Ion, 68-73, 67 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Rhesus, 528-564, 595-681, 683-691, 762-769, 773-774, 780-789, 792-793, 802-803, 527 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

527. Say, whose is the watch? Who exchange
10. Euripides, Trojan Women, 79-97, 78 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Herodotus, Histories, 1.34.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.34.1. But after Solon's departure divine retribution fell heavily on Croesus; as I guess, because he supposed himself to be blessed beyond all other men. Directly, as he slept, he had a dream, which showed him the truth of the evil things which were going to happen concerning his son.
12. Lysias, Orations, 6.33, 6.53 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Sophocles, Ajax, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-116, 1168, 117-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-133, 14-19, 2, 20-23, 233-239, 24, 240-244, 25-28, 284, 29, 293, 298-299, 3, 30-32, 326, 33-34, 349, 35-39, 394-395, 4, 40, 401-402, 41-45, 450-456, 46-49, 5, 50, 504, 51, 53, 534, 54, 542, 55-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-74, 748-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-779, 78, 780-783, 79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-98, 989, 99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 325-454, 324 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1160-1171, 555-581, 1159 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1159. Hear, then, your task. You have come to where you will reveal what sort of man you are, who are called my son. It was foreshown to me by my father far in the past that I would
16. Xenophon, Hellenica, 4.4.2-4.4.3, 4.4.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.4.2. But the Argives, Athenians, Boeotians, and 392 B.C. those among the Corinthians who had received a share of the money from the King, as well as those who had made themselves chiefly responsible for the war, realizing that if they did not put out of the way the people who had turned toward peace, the state would be in danger of going over to the Lacedaemonians again, undertook, under these circumstances, to bring about a general massacre. And in the first place, they devised the most sacrilegious of all schemes; for other people, even if a man is condemned by process of law, do not put him to death during a religious festival; but these men chose the last day of the Euclea, The festival of Artemis Euclea. because they thought they would catch more people in the market-place, so as to kill them. 4.4.3. Then again, when the signal was given to those who had been told whom they were to 392 B.C. kill, they drew their swords and struck men down,—one while standing in a social group, another while sitting in his seat, still another in the theatre, and another even while he was sitting as judge in a dramatic contest. Now when the situation became known, the better classes immediately fled, in part to the statues of the gods in the market-place, in part to the altars; then the conspirators, utterly sacrilegious and without so much as a single thought for civilized usage, both those who gave the orders and those who obeyed, kept up the slaughter even at the holy places, so that some even among those who were not victims of the attack, being right-minded men, were dismayed in their hearts at beholding such impiety. 4.4.12. And the Lacedaemonians were in no uncertainty about whom they should kill; for then at least heaven granted them an achievement such as they could never even have prayed for. For to have a crowd of enemies delivered into their hands, frightened, panic-stricken, presenting their unprotected sides, no one rallying to his own defence, but all rendering all possible assistance toward their own destruction,—how could one help regarding this as a gift from heaven? On that day, at all events, so many fell within a short time that men accustomed to see heaps of corn, wood, or stones, beheld then heaps of dead bodies. Furthermore, the Boeotians of the garrison in the port were also killed, some upon the walls, and others after they had climbed up on the roofs of the ship-houses.
17. Demosthenes, Orations, 9.54 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.4.2-10.4.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.4.2. A survey of the ancient circuit of Panopeus led me to guess it to be about seven stades. I was reminded of Homer's verses about Tityos, See Hom. Od. 11.581 where he mentions the city of Panopeus with its beautiful dancing-floors, and how in the fight over the body of Patroclus he says that Schedius, son of Iphitus and king of the Phocians, who was killed by Hector, lived in Panopeus. See Hom. Il. 17.307 foll. It seemed to me that the reason why the king lived here was fear of the Boeotians; at this point is the easiest pass from Boeotia into Phocis, so the king used Panopeus as a fortified post. 10.4.3. The former passage, in which Homer speaks of the beautiful dancing-floors of Panopeus, I could not understand until I was taught by the women whom the Athenians call Thyiads. The Thyiads are Attic women, who with the Delphian women go to Parnassus every other year and celebrate orgies in honor of Dionysus. It is the custom for these Thyiads to hold dances at places, including Panopeus, along the road from Athens . The epithet Homer applies to Panopeus is thought to refer to the dance of the Thyiads.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
aeschylus, and ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
aeschylus, and pseudo-euripides rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
ajax, and athena Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
ajax, and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
ajax, gods Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 145
ajax Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
ajax (sophocles), athena in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
alcestis Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
antigone Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 146
antigone (sophocles), and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
aphrodite Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
asebia (impiety), of andocides Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 146
athena, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
athena, as the voice of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
athena Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 146; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
audience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
bellerophon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
cattle Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
characters, in ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
characters, tragic/mythical, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
chorostatas (kho-), in postclassical tragic plays/performances Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
chorus, the, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
chorus, the, dialogue with Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
daimon Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 145
death Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 146
death / thanatos (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
dialogue, with the chorus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
discovery, and tragic reversal Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, prologue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
euripides, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
euripides, rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
frenzy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
gods, and humans Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
gods, intervention Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 146
gods, named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 145
gods, offended Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 146
heracles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
homer Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
homeric Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
humans, and the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
knowledge, of athena Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
lamentation, and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
lucidity, and tragic reversal Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
lysander the lacedaemonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
madness, of ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
mechane/mechanè Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
misfortunes, of ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
morality, in ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
names, gods named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 145
oaths, defendants holding public offices Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 146
odysseus, and ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367, 443
odysseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 146; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
oedipus, and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
oedipus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 146
oedipus the king (sophocles), and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
on high, staging of gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
phaedra Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
plot Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
polydorus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
poseidon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
power, of athena Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367, 443
prologue, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
re-enactment Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 146
reliance on passages from earlier drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
retrospective reference Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 146
reversal, tragic Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, language and style Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
rhesus by pseudo-euripides, metre and diction Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
satyr drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
scholia, on ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
self, and suicide Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
sequence, mythic, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
setting, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
sign Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
sophocles, and the rhesus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 80
spectacle, of ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367
structure, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 473
suicide, and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
tecmessa, and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 443
violence/violent' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 320
visibility Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 84
voice, of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 367