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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10333
Silius Italicus, Punica, 8.131-8.133
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Ovid, Fasti, 3.523-3.696 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.523. Not far from your banks, Tiber, far flowing river. 3.524. The people come and drink there, scattered on the grass 3.525. And every man reclines there with his girl. 3.526. Some tolerate the open sky, a few pitch tents 3.527. And some make leafy huts out of branches 3.528. While others set reeds up, to form rigid pillars 3.529. And hang their outspread robes from the reeds. 3.530. But they’re warmed by sun and wine, and pray 3.531. For as many years as cups, as many as they drink. 3.532. There you’ll find a man who quaffs Nestor’s years 3.533. A woman who’d age as the Sibyl, in her cups. 3.534. There they sing whatever they’ve learnt in the theatres 3.535. Beating time to the words with ready hands 3.536. And setting the bowl down, dance coarsely 3.537. The trim girl leaping about with streaming hair. 3.538. Homecoming they stagger, a sight for vulgar eyes 3.539. And the crowd meeting them call them ‘blessed’. 3.540. I fell in with the procession lately (it seems to me worth 3.541. Saying): a tipsy old woman dragging a tipsy old man. 3.542. But since errors abound as to who this goddess is 3.543. I’m determined not to cloak her story. 3.544. Wretched Dido burned with love for Aeneas 3.545. She burned on the pyre built for her funeral: 3.546. Her ashes were gathered, and this brief couplet 3.547. Which she left, in dying, adorned her tomb: 3.548. AENEAS THE REASON, HIS THE BLADE EMPLOYED. 3.549. DIDO BY HER OWN HAND WAS DESTROYED. 3.550. The Numidians immediately invaded the defencele 3.551. Realm, and Iarbas the Moor captured and held the palace. 3.552. Remembering her scorn, he said: ‘See, I, whom she 3.553. So many times rejected, now enjoy Elissa’s marriage bed.’ 3.554. The Tyrians scattered, as each chanced to stray, as bee 3.555. often wander confusedly, having lost their Queen. 3.556. Anna, was driven from her home, weeping on leaving 3.557. Her sister’s city, after first paying honour to that sister. 3.558. The loose ashes drank perfume mixed with tears 3.559. And received an offering of her shorn hair: 3.560. Three times she said: ‘Farewell!’ three times lifted 3.561. And pressed the ashes to her lips, seeing her sister there. 3.562. Finding a ship, and companions for her flight, she glided 3.563. Away, looking back at the city, her sister’s sweet work. 3.564. There’s a fertile island, Melite, near barren Cosyra 3.565. Lashed by the waves of the Libyan sea. Trusting in 3.566. The king’s former hospitality, she headed there 3.567. Battus was king there, and was a wealthy host. 3.568. When he had learned the fates of the two sisters 3.569. He said: ‘This land, however small, is yours.’ 3.570. He would have been hospitable to the end 3.571. Except that he feared Pygmalion’s great power. 3.572. The corn had been taken to be threshed a third time 3.573. And a third time the new wine poured into empty vats. 3.574. The sun had twice circled the zodiac, and a third year 3.575. Was passing, when Anna had to find a fresh place of exile. 3.576. Her brother came seeking war. The king hated weapons 3.577. And said: ‘We are peaceable, flee for your own safety!’ 3.578. She fled at his command, gave her ship to the wind and waves: 3.579. Her brother was crueller than any ocean. 3.580. There’s a little field by the fish-filled stream 3.581. of stony Crathis: the local people call it Camere. 3.582. There she sailed, and when she was no further away 3.583. Than the distance reached by nine slingshots 3.584. The sails first fell and then flapped in the light breeze. 3.585. ‘Attack the water with oars!’ cried the captain. 3.586. And while they made ready to reef the sails 3.587. The swift South Wind struck the curved stern 3.588. And despite the captain’s efforts swept them 3.589. Into the open sea: the land was lost to sight. 3.590. The waves attacked them, and the ocean heaved 3.591. From the depths, and the hull gulped the foaming waters. 3.592. Skill is defeated by the wind, the steersman no longer 3.593. Guides the helm, but he too turns to prayer for aid. 3.594. The Phoenician exile is thrown high on swollen waves 3.595. And hides her weeping eyes in her robe: 3.596. Then for a first time she called her sister Dido happy 3.597. And whoever, anywhere, might be treading dry land. 3.598. A great gust drove the ship to the Laurentine shore 3.599. And, foundering, it perished, when all had landed. 3.600. Meanwhile pious Aeneas had gained Latinus’ realm 3.601. And his daughter too, and had merged both peoples. 3.602. While he was walking barefoot along the shore 3.603. That had been his dower, accompanied only by Achates 3.604. He saw Anna wandering, not believing it was her: 3.605. ‘Why should she be here in the fields of Latium?’ 3.606. Aeneas said to himself: ‘It’s Anna!’ shouted Achates: 3.607. At the sound of her name she raised her face. 3.608. Alas, what should she do? Flee? Wish for the ground 3.609. To swallow her? Her wretched sister’s fate was before her eyes. 3.610. The Cytherean hero felt her fear, and spoke to her 3.611. (He still wept, moved by your memory, Elissa): 3.612. ‘Anna, I swear, by this land that you once knew 3.613. A happier fate had granted me, and by the god 3.614. My companions, who have lately found a home here 3.615. That all of them often rebuked me for my delay. 3.616. Yet I did not fear her dying, that fear was absent. 3.617. Ah me! Her courage was beyond belief. 3.618. Don’t re-tell it: I saw shameful wounds on her body 3.619. When I dared to visit the houses of Tartarus. 3.620. But you shall enjoy the comforts of my kingdom 3.621. Whether your will or a god brings you to our shores. 3.622. I owe you much, and owe Elissa not a little: 3.623. You are welcome for your own and your sister’s sake.’ 3.624. She accepted his words (no other hope was left) 3.625. And told him of her own wanderings. 3.626. When she entered the palace, dressed in Tyrian style 3.627. Aeneas spoke (the rest of the throng were silent): 3.628. ‘Lavinia, my wife, I have a pious reason for entrusting 3.629. This lady to you: shipwrecked, I lived at her expense. 3.630. She’s of Tyrian birth: her kingdom’s on the Libyan shore: 3.631. I beg you to love her, as your dear sister.’ 3.632. Lavinia promised all, but hid a fancied wrong 3.633. Within her silent heart, and concealed her fears: 3.634. And though she saw many gifts given away openly 3.635. She suspected many more were sent secretly. 3.636. She hadn’t yet decided what to do: she hated 3.637. With fury, prepared a plan, and wished to die avenged. 3.638. It was night: it seemed her sister Dido stood 3.639. Before her bed, her straggling hair stained with her blood 3.640. Crying: ‘Flee, don’t hesitate, flee this gloomy house!’ 3.641. At the words a gust slammed the creaking door. 3.642. Anna leapt up, then jumped from a low window 3.643. To the ground: fear itself had made her daring. 3.644. With terror driving her, clothed in her loose vest 3.645. She runs like a frightened doe that hears the wolves. 3.646. It’s thought that horned Numicius swept her away 3.647. In his swollen flood, and hid her among his pools. 3.648. Meanwhile, shouting, they searched for the Sidonian lady 3.649. Through the fields: traces and tracks were visible: 3.650. Reaching the banks, they found her footprints there. 3.651. The knowing river stemmed his silent waters. 3.652. She herself appeared, saying: ‘I’m a nymph of the calm 3.653. Numicius: hid in perennial waters, Anna Perenna’s my name.’ 3.654. Quickly they set out a feast in the fields they’d roamed 3.655. And celebrated their deeds and the day, with copious wine. 3.656. Some think she’s the Moon, because she measures out 3.657. The year (annus): others, Themis, or the Inachian heifer. 3.658. Anna, you’ll find some to say you’re a nymph, daughter 3.659. of Azan, and gave Jupiter his first nourishment. 3.660. I’ll relate another tale that’s come to my ears 3.661. And it’s not so far away from the truth. 3.662. The Plebs of old, not yet protected by Tribunes 3.663. Fled, and gathered on the Sacred Mount: 3.664. The food supplies they’d brought with them failed 3.665. Also the stores of bread fit for human consumption. 3.666. There was a certain Anna from suburban Bovillae 3.667. A poor woman, old, but very industrious. 3.668. With her grey hair bound up in a light cap 3.669. She used to make coarse cakes with a trembling hand 3.670. And distribute them, still warm, among the people 3.671. Each morning: this supply of hers pleased them all. 3.672. When peace was made at home, they set up a statue 3.673. To Perenna, because she’d helped supply their needs. 3.674. Now it’s left for me to tell why the girls sing coarse songs: 3.675. Since they gather together to sing certain infamous things. 3.676. Anna had lately been made a goddess: Gradivus came to her 3.677. And taking her aside, spoke these words: 3.678. You honour my month: I’ve joined my season to yours: 3.679. I’ve great hopes you can do me a service. 3.680. Armed, I’m captivated by armed Minerva 3.681. I burn, and have nursed the wound for many a day. 3.682. Help us, alike in our pursuits, to become one: 3.683. The part suits you well, courteous old lady.’ 3.684. He spoke. She tricked the god with empty promises. 3.685. And led him on, in foolish hope, with false delays. 3.686. often, when he pressed her, she said: ‘I’ve done as you asked 3.687. She’s won, she’s yielded at last to your prayers.’ 3.688. The lover believed her and prepared the marriage-chamber. 3.689. They led Anna there, a new bride, her face veiled. 3.690. About to kiss her, Mars suddenly saw it was Anna: 3.691. Shame and anger alternating stirred the hoodwinked god. 3.692. The new goddess laughed at her dear Minerva’s lover. 3.693. Nothing indeed has ever pleased Venus more. 3.694. So now they tell old jokes, and coarse songs are sung 3.695. And they delight in how the great god was cheated. 3.696. I was about to neglect those daggers that pierced
2. Propertius, Elegies, 3.11.57 (1st cent. BCE

3. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.419-1.420, 2.458-2.462, 2.589-2.623, 4.408-4.411 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.419. upon him broke, resolved to take survey 1.420. of this strange country whither wind and wave 2.458. where grim Bellona called, and all the air 2.459. resounded high as heaven with shouts of war. 2.460. Rhipeus and Epytus of doughty arm 2.461. were at my side, Dymas and Hypanis 2.462. een by a pale moon, join our little band; 2.589. There we beheld the war-god unconfined; 2.590. The Greek besiegers to the roof-tops fled; 2.591. or, with shields tortoise-back, the gates assailed. 2.592. Ladders were on the walls; and round by round 2.593. up the huge bulwark as they fight their way 2.594. the shielded left-hand thwarts the falling spears 2.595. the right to every vantage closely clings. 2.596. The Trojans hurl whole towers and roof-tops down 2.597. upon the mounting foe; for well they see 2.598. that the last hour is come, and with what arms 2.599. the dying must resist. Rich gilded beams 2.600. with many a beauteous blazon of old time 2.601. go crashing down. Men armed with naked swords 2.603. Thus were our hearts inflamed to stand and strike 2.604. for the king's house, and to his body-guard 2.605. bring succor, and renew their vanquished powers. 2.606. A certain gate I knew, a secret way 2.607. which gave free passage between Priam's halls 2.608. and exit rearward; hither, in the days 2.609. before our fall, the lone Andromache 2.610. was wont with young Astyanax to pass 2.611. in quest of Priam and her husband's kin. 2.612. This way to climb the palace roof I flew 2.613. where, desperate, the Trojans with vain skill 2.614. hurled forth repellent arms. A tower was there 2.615. reared skyward from the roof-top, giving view 2.616. of Troy 's wide walls and full reconnaissance 2.617. of all Achaea 's fleets and tented field; 2.618. this, with strong steel, our gathered strength assailed 2.619. and as the loosened courses offered us 2.620. great threatening fissures, we uprooted it 2.621. from its aerial throne and thrust it down. 2.622. It fell with instantaneous crash of thunder 2.623. along the Danaan host in ruin wide. 4.408. at this resolve: he summoned to his side 4.409. Mnestheus, Sergestus, and Serestus bold 4.410. and bade them fit the fleet, all silently 4.411. gathering the sailors and collecting gear
4. Silius Italicus, Punica, 1.32, 1.38-1.39, 2.296, 8.50, 8.108-8.111, 8.132-8.133, 8.209, 8.217, 10.337-10.371, 12.691-12.730, 15.384-15.385, 16.684-16.685, 17.616-17.617 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 6.439 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
anna perenna Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
cannae Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
carthage, virgilian Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
carthage Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
descending Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
despicere (looking down)' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
dido Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
fear, and hope ( spes ) Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
fear, weaponization of Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hamilcar Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, and aeneas Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, and medea Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, as anti-aeneas Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, as jason Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, fear-mongering Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, feminized Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, ira Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, politically impotent Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hannibal, tyrant Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
hills of rome, political topography Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
hills of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
janiculum hill Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
juno, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
juno, pun. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
jupiter, pun. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
looking down (despicere) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
maecenas, and virgil Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
maecenas, literary patronage Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
medea, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
metus hannibalis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
movement in the city, descending Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
movement in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
palatine hill, seat of imperial power Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
patrons, of literature Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
personification Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
roman senate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
scipio africanus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
size of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
trasimene, lake Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
troy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 178
turnus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
tyrant, political impotence Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
venus, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92
zama Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 92