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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10333
Silius Italicus, Punica, 7.438-7.440
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nanhe was chosen to witness the contest of the goddesses for the prize of beauty. Then a Cupid drove the snow-white swans harnessed to his mother's car, and feared to be too late for the contest. A tiny quiver and a golden bow glittered at his shoulder, and he signed to his mother to have no fear, and showed her the quiver that he carried loaded with arrows. Another Cupid combed the tresses on her snow-white brow, and a third put the girdle round the folds of her purple robe. Then Venus sighed, and her rosy lips thus addressed her pretty children: "See, the day has come that will prove beyond all doubt your love for your mother. Who would dare to believe, that while you still live, the claim of Venus to the prize for beauty is contested? What worse remains behind? If I gave to my children all my arrows steeped in delicious poison — if your grandsire," the Lawgiver of heaven and earth, stands a suppliant before you when so you please, then let my triumph bear back to Cyprus the palm of Edom won from Pallas, and let the hundred altars of Paphos smoke for my conquest of Juno.' And, while Cytherea thus charged her winged children, all the grove re-echoed the footsteps of a goddess. For now came the Warrior Maid. She had laid aside her aegis; the hair which the helmet was wont to hide was braided now, and her clear eyes wore a studied look of peace; and her sacred feet bore her quickly to the appointed grove. From another quarter obedient to the call came the daughter of Saturn; though wedded to her brother, Jupiter, she must endure to be judged and rejected by the Trojan shepherd on Mount Ida. Last came Venus with smiling face, glorious in her beauty.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Cicero, On Duties, 1.118 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.118. Nam quodHerculem Prodicus dicit, ut est apud Xenophontem, cum primum pubesceret, quod tempus a natura ad deligendum, quam quisque viam vivendi sit ingressurus, datum est, exisse in solitudinem atque ibi sedentem diu secum multumque dubitasse, cum duas cerneret vias, unam Voluptatis, alteram Virtutis, utram ingredi melius esset, hoc Herculi Iovis satu edito potuit fortasse contingere, nobis non item, qui imitamur, quos cuique visum est, atque ad eorum studia institutaque impellimur; plerumque autem parentium praeceptis imbuti ad eorum consuetudinem moremque deducimur; alii multitudinis iudicio feruntur, quaeque maiori parti pulcherrima videntur, ea maxime exoptant; non nulli tamen sive felicitate quadam sive bonitate naturae sine parentium disciplina rectam vitae secuti sunt viam. 1.118.  For we cannot all have the experience of Hercules, as we find it in the words of Prodicus in Xenophon; "When Hercules was just coming into youth's estate (the time which Nature has appointed unto every man for choosing the path of life on which he would enter), he went out into a desert place. And as he saw two paths, the path of Pleasure and the path of Virtue, he sat down and debated long and earnestly which one it were better for him to take." This might, perhaps, happen to a Hercules, "scion of the seed of Jove"; but it cannot well happen to us; for we copy each the model he fancies, and we are constrained to adopt their pursuits and vocations. But usually, we are so imbued with the teachings of our parents, that we fall irresistibly into their manners and customs. Others drift with the current of popular opinion and make especial choice of those callings which the majority find most attractive. Some, however, as the result either of some happy fortune or of natural ability, enter upon the right path of life, without parental guidance.
2. Cicero, Republic, 1.54, 1.69 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.54. Tum Laelius: Quid tu, inquit, Scipio? e tribus istis quod maxime probas? S. Recte quaeris, quod maxime e tribus, quoniam eorum nullum ipsum per se separatim probo anteponoque singulis illud, quod conflatum fuerit ex omnibus. Sed si unum ac simplex pro bandum sit, regium pro bem....... pri........ in .................... hoc loco appellatur, occurrit nomen quasi patrium regis, ut ex se natis, ita consulentis suis civibus et eos conservantis stu dios ius quam .....entis.......tem.........is.........tibus ...........uos sustentari unius optimi et summi viri diligentia. 1.69. Quod ita cum sit, ex tribus primis generibus longe praestat mea sententia regium, regio autem ipsi praestabit id, quod erit aequatum et temperatum ex tribus optimis rerum publicarum modis. Placet enim esse quiddam in re publica praestans et regale, esse aliud auctoritati principum inpartitum ac tributum, esse quasdam res servatas iudicio voluntatique multitudinis. Haec constitutio primum habet aequabilitatem quandam magnam, qua carere diutius vix possunt liberi, deinde firmitudinem, quod et illa prima facile in contraria vitia convertuntur, ut existat ex rege dominus, ex optimatibus factio, ex populo turba et confusio, quodque ipsa genera generibus saepe conmutantur novis, hoc in hac iuncta moderateque permixta conformatione rei publicae non ferme sine magnis principum vitiis evenit. Non est enim causa conversionis, ubi in suo quisque est gradu firmiter collocatus et non subest, quo praecipitet ac decidat.
3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 11.56-11.60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Vergil, Georgics, 4.523 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.523. The fetters, or in showery drops anon
5. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.10.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 1.10.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 612, 611 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Silius Italicus, Punica, 7.437, 7.439-7.440, 7.472-7.478, 7.487-7.493 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Statius, Siluae, 3.1.116-3.1.120 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Statius, Thebais, 2.700 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.471-1.472, 1.542-1.560, 4.85 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.17.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.17.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345
amphion Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345
arion Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
capua, decadence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
carmina conuiuialia, greco-roman ethos of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
carthage Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283, 317
chiron Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
ciconian matrons Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
cupids, sons of venus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
dido Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
ennius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345
fides / fides Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
hannibal, in capua Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
hannibal Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
hebrus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
hercules Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
homer Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345
hospitality, greco-roman Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 344, 345
luxuria, in capua Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
maenads Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
modestia Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
oedipus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
orpheus, decapitation of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
orpheus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
paris, judgment of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283, 317
paris Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345
pollius felix Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
proteus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 344, 345
punic wars, second Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283, 317
rome Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345
scipio aemilianus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
scipio africanus, imitatio of alexander the great by Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
scipio africanus, meeting with virtus and voluptas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
silius italicus, and cicero Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
silius italicus, and ennius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
silius italicus, and homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
silius italicus, and lucretius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
silius italicus, and the tradition on kingship Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
silius italicus, nekyia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
silius italicus, the power of lyre and music in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
silius italicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 344, 345
teuthras Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283
troy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345
underworld Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 317
venus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 283, 317
virgil' Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 345