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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10333
Silius Italicus, Punica, 4.396


nanin death were they, whom love of kin and country sent down to join the dead! Coming ages will pray for brethren like them, and their undying fame shall be for ever remembered, if only my verse has power to endure and see a distant posterity, and if Apollo has not begrudged me fame. When the ranks were straggling over all the plain, Scipio's voice (while his voice lasted) stopped them: "Whither do you carry back your standards? What panic has robbed you of yourselves? If it seemed a dreadful thing to stand in the front rank and challenge the van of the foe, then take your stand behind me, soldiers, dismiss your fears, and merely look on! Yonder warriors are the sons of our prisoners. Whither do you fly? What hope have you, if defeated? Shall we make for the Alps? Believe that Rome in person, with her walls and her head crowned with towers, is now stretching out her hands in supplication. I see all our children carried captive, our parents slain, and the fires of Vesta quenched with blood. Keep this sacrilege far away!" Thus he shouted again and again, till the effort and the thick dust choked his voice; then he seized his reins with the left hand and his sword with the right, and exposed his broad breast to the foe, threatening to use his bare blade at once, now against himself" and now against the fugitives, if they refused to stand. When the Father of Heaven beheld this battle from the height of Olympus, his heart was moved by the danger of the noble consul. He summoned Mars and spoke thus to his son: "Son, unless thou takest part in the strife, this will surely be the last fight of yonder hero; and I fear for him. Snatch him away from the battle; so fiery is he, and he forgets himself in the joy of slaughter.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Ennius, Annales, 405-406, 404 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2. Polybius, Histories, 3.25.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.25.6.  The oaths they had to swear were as follows. In the case of the first treaty the Carthaginians swore by their ancestral gods and the Romans, following an old custom, by Jupiter Lapis, and in the case of this latter treaty by Mars and Quirinus.
3. Horace, Odes, 3.30.1-3.30.2, 3.30.7-3.30.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.25-1.15.26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.871-15.872, 15.876-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 9.446-9.449 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.446. that no man smite behind us. I myself 9.447. will mow the mighty fieid, and lead thee on 9.448. in a wide swath of slaughter.” With this word 9.449. he shut his lips; and hurled him with his sword
7. Vergil, Georgics, 3.10-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 9.961-9.999 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Silius Italicus, Punica, 1.8, 1.301-1.302, 2.632, 4.470, 13.391 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 2.244-2.246 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
caesar (julius) Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
carthage Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 182
euryalus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
fides definition of, and pietas Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 182
fides definition of, punica Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 182
hannibal Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 182
jupiter Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 182
nisus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
punic war first, second Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 182
punic wars, second Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
scipio africanus, and achilles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
scipio africanus, imitatio of alexander the great by Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
scipio africanus, katabasis of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
scipio africanus, meeting with homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
sibyl Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
silius italicus, and ennius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
silius italicus, and homer Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
silius italicus, and lucan Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
silius italicus, and lucretius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
silius italicus, and virgil Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
silius italicus, nekyia in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293
silius italicus fides in Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 182
underworld' Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 293