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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10328
Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 4.7


nanVII To his kinsman Simplicius (Date not indicated) 'You spur the willing,' is the usual comment of the man who meant to do unasked the thing you ask of him. You ask how the quotation applies? The bearer of these lines insists on a letter of introduction from me, whereas, the moment I knew where he was going I should myself have begged the privilege of giving it before he opened his mouth, obliging him not so much from consideration for him as from my warm feeling towards yourself. For the rest, my messenger calculates that by doing me a service he will have deserved a good turn; he has obtained what he wanted, but without ever dreaming how close the bond is which unites you and me. [2] Miles away though I remain, I shall be able to picture his stupefaction on his arrival, when the mere fact that he comes from me secures him respectful welcome, and he finds no effectual use for a letter which it was really superfluous to solicit. I can see it all as if I were there; the novelty of everything to one whose wits are not of the sharpest; his confusion as a stranger invited to make himself at home, or as a nervous guest drawn into conversation, or as a countrified fellow called on to take his part in polite gaiety, or as a poor man set down at a sumptuous board. It will be strange indeed to a man from these parts, where ill-cooked viands and too much onion afford the only fare, to find himself as nobly regaled as if he had eaten his fill all his days at Apician banquets, served by the rhythmic carvers of Byzantium. 3. Anyhow, whatever his merit or importance, he could not have better helped me to pay my debt of friendship. Men of his type are often almost beneath our notice; at the same time friends who, like ourselves, are thrown back on letters for their intercourse would lose many a chance of writing were they too particular about the person of their messengers. Farewell.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

1 results
1. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 3.13-3.14, 4.17, 5.5 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amicitia' Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 32
amicitia Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 32
sidonius, literary style Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 32; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 32
simplicius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 33; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 33
trier Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 33; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 33