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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10328
Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 3.6


nanVI To his friend Eutropius [470 CE (?) ]IF kind memories still remain to you of our old comradeship and of an intimacy ever and again renewed, you will readily understand that our soaring wishes will follow your ascent to each new height of office. We rejoice with you over your insignia, believing that thereby your house and our friendship are alike promoted. In proof whereof I remind you of my letter of exhortations 1, which I think had no small share in this result. [2] But what trouble I had in persuading you that a man might be a philosopher and a prefect at the same time! You were deep in the tenets of Plotinus, and the Platonic school had seduced you into a quietism unsuited to your age. I maintained that only a man without family obligations was free to profess a philosophy of that nature. Most people ascribed your scorn for public service to simple indolence; malignant tongues added that our nobles fail to rise in the state less from disinclination than incapacity. [3] Now, therefore, as a Christian should, I begin by rendering unstinted thanks to Our Lord who has raised you to an official rank befitting your exalted birth; our hopes are also raised, so that we may fairly look for even better things to come. It is a common saying with provincials that a good year really depends less on ample crops than on a good administration; it must be yours, honoured lord, to crown all our expectations by such measures as the present occasion demands. Our nobles do not forget the stock from which you spring; they are sure that so long as the family of Sabinus controls their destinies, they have nothing to fear from the house of Sabinianus. Farewell.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 337, 336 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

336. Should not be seized – god-sent, it’s better far.
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 533-537, 532 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

532. Revenge for crafty Cronus’ progeny.
3. Homer, Iliad, 1.460-1.463, 2.422-2.425 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 2.422. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.423. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.424. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.425. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits.
4. Aristophanes, Peace, 1040, 1039 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1039. ταυτὶ δέδραται. τίθεσο τὼ μηρὼ λαβών.
5. Herodotus, Histories, 4.35 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.35. In this way, then, these maidens are honored by the inhabitants of Delos. These same Delians relate that two virgins, Arge and Opis, came from the Hyperboreans by way of the aforesaid peoples to Delos earlier than Hyperoche and Laodice; ,these latter came to bring to Eileithyia the tribute which they had agreed to pay for easing child-bearing; but Arge and Opis, they say, came with the gods themselves, and received honors of their own from the Delians. ,For the women collected gifts for them, calling upon their names in the hymn made for them by Olen of Lycia; it was from Delos that the islanders and Ionians learned to sing hymns to Opis and Arge, calling upon their names and collecting gifts (this Olen, after coming from Lycia, also made the other and ancient hymns that are sung at Delos). ,Furthermore, they say that when the thighbones are burnt in sacrifice on the altar, the ashes are all cast on the burial-place of Opis and Arge, behind the temple of Artemis, looking east, nearest the refectory of the people of Ceos.
6. Sophocles, Antigone, 1006-1011, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Menander, Dyscolus, 448-453, 447 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.13.9, 8.38.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.13.9. The first stage of the altar at Olympia, called prothysis, has a circumference of one hundred and twenty-five feet; the circumference of the stage on the prothysis is thirty-two feet; the total height of the altar reaches to twenty-two feet. The victims themselves it is the custom to sacrifice on the lower stage, the prothysis. But the thighs they carry up to the highest part of the altar and burn them there. 8.38.8. On the east side of the mountain there is a sanctuary of Apollo surnamed Parrhasian. They also give him the name Pythian. They hold every year a festival in honor of the god and sacrifice in the market-place a boar to Apollo Helper, and after the sacrifice here they at once carry the victim to the sanctuary of Parrhasian Apollo in procession to the music of the flute; cutting out the thigh-bones they burn them, and also consume the meat of the victim on the spot.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
avitus, death Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 23; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
cicero Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 23; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
damocles Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 23; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
eutropius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 23; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
horace, allusions Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 23; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
juvenal, allusions Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 23; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
petronius maximus (emperor) Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 23; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23
ricimer, and avitus' death" "102.0_23@ricimer, and avitus' death" Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 23