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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10328
Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 3.13


nanXIII To [his son] Apollinaris [c. 469 CE] THE love of purity which leads you to shun the company of the immodest has my whole approval; I rejoice at it and respect it, especially when the men you shun are those whose aptitude for scenting and retailing scandals leaves nothing privileged or sacred, wretches who think themselves enormously facetious when they violate the public sense of shame by shameless language. Hear now from my lips that the standard-bearer of the vile troop is the very Gnatho of our country. [2] Imagine an arch-stringer of tales, arch-fabricator of false charges, arch-retailer of insinuations. A fellow whose talk is at once without end and without point; a buffoon without charm in gaiety; a bully who dares not stand his ground. Inquisitive without insight, and three-times more the boor for his brazen affectation of fine manners. A creature of the present hour, with ever a carping word ready for the past and a sneer for the future. When he is after some advantage, no beggar so importunate as he; when refused, none so bitter in depreciation. Grant his request and he grumbles, using every artifice to get better terms; he moans and groans when called on to refund a debt, and if he pays, you never hear the end of it. But when any one wants a loan of him he lies about his means and pretends he has not the wherewithal; if he does lend, he makes capital out of the loan, and bruits the secret abroad; if debtors delay repayment he resorts to calumny; when they have absolved the debt he tries to deny receipt. [3] Abstinence is his abomination, he loves the table; but a man who lives well wins no praise from him unless he treats well too. Personally, he is avarice itself; the best of bread is not for his digestion unless it is also the bread of others. He only eats at home if he can pilfer his viands, and send them off amid a storm of buffets. He cannot indeed be wholly denied the virtue of frugality; he fasts when he cannot get himself invited. Yet with the light perversity of the parasite, he will often excuse himself when asked; on the other hand, if he sees that men avoid him, he will fish for invitations. [4] If left out he grows abusive; if admitted, unbearably elate: no blow descends on him unexpected. If dinner is served late, he falls like a bandit upon the dishes; if appetite is stilled too soon, he falls to lamentation. Thirst unquenched makes him quarrelsome; drunkenness makes him sick. If he banters others, he grows scurrilous; if others banter him, ungovernable; take him for all in all, he is like the filth in sewers, the fouler the more you stir it. His life brings pleasure to few, love to none, contemptuous mockery to all. He is one to burst bladders or break canes upon, one whose thirst for drink is only excelled by his thirst for scandal; exhaling loathsomeness, frothing wine, uttering venom, he makes one doubt for what to hate him most, his unsavouriness, his drunken habits, or his villany.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Sallust, Catiline, 22.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.18.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.18.12. The festival begins with a most splendid procession in honor of Artemis, and the maiden officiating as priestess rides last in the procession upon a car yoked to deer. It is, however, not till the next day that the sacrifice is offered, and the festival is not only a state function but also quite a popular general holiday. For the people throw alive upon the altar edible birds and every kind of victim as well; there are wild boars, deer and gazelles; some bring wolf-cubs or bear-cubs, others the full-grown beasts. They also place upon the altar fruit of cultivated trees.
3. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.21 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 3.21 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 2.1, 2.9-2.10, 3.14, 4.7, 4.17, 4.24, 5.5, 5.13, 7.7, 9.6 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amicitia Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 31; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 31
apollinaris (son) Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 92; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 92
hesperius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 30; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 30
humour, name puns Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 94; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 94
paideia' Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 94
paideia Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 94
pliny, as a model Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 94; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 94
sallust, allusions Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 94; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 94
sidonius, episcopacy Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 94; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 94
simplicius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 33; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 33
terence, allusions Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 92; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 92
trier Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 33; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 33
turnus Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 92; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 92
turpio Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 92; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 92