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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10328
Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 1.6-1.7


nanVI To his friend Eutropius [467 CE] I HAVE long wished to write, but feel the impulse more than ever now, when by the Christ's preventing grace, I am actually on the way to Rome. My sole motive, or at least my chief one, is to drag you from the slough of your domestic ease by an appeal to you to enter the imperial service. . . .


nanVII To his friend Vincentius [468 CE] THE case of Arvandus distresses me, nor do I conceal my distress, for it is our emperor's crowning praise that a condemned prisoner may have friends who need not hide their friendship. I was more intimate with this man than it was safe to be with one so light and so unstable, witness the odium lately kindled against me on his account, the flame of which has scorched me for this lapse from prudence. [2] But since I had given my friendship, honour bound me fast, though he on his side has no steadfastness at all; I say this because it is the truth and not to strike him when he is down. For he despised friendly advice and made himself throughout the sport of fortune; the marvel to me is, not that he fell at last, but that he ever stood so long. How often he would boast of weathering adversity, when we, with a less superficial sense of things, deplored the sure disaster of his rashness, unable to call happy any man who only sometimes and not always deserves the name.


nanVIII To his friend Candidianus [468 CE] You congratulate me on my prolonged stay at Rome, though I note the touch of irony, and your wit at my expense. You say you are glad your old friend has at last seen the sun, since on the Arar his chances of a good look at it are few and far between. You abuse my misty Lyons, and deplore the days so cloaked by morning fog that the full heat of noon can scarcely unveil them. [2] Now does this nonsense fitly come from a native of that oven of a town Cesena? You have shown your real opinion of your charming and convenient natal soil by leaving it. The midges of Po may pierce your ears; the city frogs may croak and swarm on every side, but you know very well that you are better off in exile at Ravenna than at home. In that marsh of yours the laws of everything are always the wrong way about; the waters stand and the walls fall, the towers float and the ships stick fast, the sick man walks and the doctor lies abed, the baths are chill and the houses blaze, the dead swim and the quick are dry, the powers are asleep and the thieves wide awake, the clergy live by usury and the Syrian chants the Psalms, business men turn soldiers and soldiers business men, old fellows play ball and young fellows hazard, eunuchs take to arms and rough allies to letters. [3] And that is the kind of city you choose to settle in, a place that may boast a territory but little solid ground. Be kinder, therefore, to Transalpines who never provoked you; their climate wins too cheap a triumph if it shines only by comparison with such as yours. Farewell.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.11.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.11.7. There are images also of Alexanor and of Euamerion; to the former they give offerings as to a hero after the setting of the sun; to Euamerion, as being a god, they give burnt sacrifices. If I conjecture aright, the Pergamenes, in accordance with an oracle, call this Euamerion Telesphorus (Accomplisher) while the Epidaurians call him Acesis (Cure). There is also a wooden image of Coronis, but it has no fixed position anywhere in the temple. While to the god are being sacrificed a bull, a lamb, and a pig, they remove Coronis to the sanctuary of Athena and honor her there. The parts of the victims which they offer as a burnt sacrifice, and they are not content with cutting out the thighs, they burn on the ground, except the birds, which they burn on the altar.
2. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 1.2-1.5, 1.7-1.8, 1.10-1.11, 4.22, 5.5, 8.3, 9.13 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

3. Epigraphy, Lsam, 36



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amicitia Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 41; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 41
barbarians Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 41; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 41
baths Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 41; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 41
burgundians Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
dating Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
eutropius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 69; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 69
honorius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 69; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 69
leo (visigothic adviser) Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
majorian Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
pliny, as a model Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
ricimer, wedding Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 41; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 41
rome (city) Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 41; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 41
sidonius, praefectus urbis Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
slaves' Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 41
slaves Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 41
syagrius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
visigoths Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21