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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10328
Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 1.2-1.4


nanII To [his brother-in-law] Agricola [454(?) CE] You have often begged a description of Theodoric the Gothic king, whose gentle breeding fame commends to every nation; you want him in his quantity and quality, in his person, and the manner of his existence. I gladly accede, as far as the limits of my page allow, and highly approve so fine and ingenuous a curiosity. Well, he is a man worth knowing, even by those who cannot enjoy his close acquaintance, so happily have Providence and Nature joined to endow him with the perfect gifts of fortune; his way of life is such that not even the envy which lies in wait for kings can rob him of his proper praise. [2] And first as to his person. He is well set up, in height above the average man, but below the giant. His head is round, with curled hair retreating somewhat from brow to crown. His nervous neck is free from disfiguring knots. The eyebrows are bushy and arched; when the lids droop, the lashes reach almost half-way down the cheeks. The upper ears are buried under overlying locks, after the fashion of his race. The nose is finely aquiline; the lips are thin and not enlarged by undue distension of the mouth. Every day the hair springing from his nostrils is cut back; that on the face springs thick from the hollow of the temples, but the razor has not yet come upon his cheek, and his barber is assiduous in eradicating the rich growth on the lower part of the face. [3] Chin, throat, and neck are full, but not fat, and all of fair complexion; seen close, their colour is fresh as that of youth; they often flush, but from modesty, and not from anger. His shoulders are smooth, the upper- and forearms strong and hard; hands broad, breast prominent; waist receding. The spine dividing the broad expanse of back does not project, and you can see the springing of the ribs; the sides swell with salient muscle, the well-girt flanks are full of vigour. His thighs are like hard horn; the knee-joints firm and masculine; the knees themselves the comeliest and least wrinkled in the world. A full ankle supports the leg, and the foot is small to bear such mighty limbs.


nanIII To his friend Filimatius [467 CE] INDICT me now by the laws against intrigue, degrade me from the Senate for keeping patient eyes on the promotion to which, after all, birth gives me claim, since my own sire and my wife's, my grandsire and his sire too before him were urban and praetorian prefects, or held high rank in court and army. [2] If it comes to that, consider our friend Gaudentius, who but now of tribune's rank, towers in the dignity of the Vicariate above the unenterprising sloth of our good citizens. Of course our young nobles grumble at his passing over their heads; as for him, his one sentiment is satisfaction. And they now respect a man scorned till yesterday; amazed at such a sudden rise, they look up to one as magistrate on whom as neighbour they looked down. He for his part sets his crier to stun the ears of his drowsy detractors; though envy goads them to hostility they always find a friendly bench reserved for them in court. [3] You too had best make good the loss of your old office by the membership of the prefect's council now offered you; if you fail to do so, if you sit without the advantage which such a position confers, you will be set down as one only fit to represent a Vicarius. Farewell.


nanIV To his friend Gaudentius [467 CE] CONGRATULATIONS, most honoured friend; the rods of office are yours by merit. To win your dignities you did not parade your mother's income, or the largess of your ancestors, your wife's jewels, or your paternal inheritance. In place of all this, it was your obvious sincerity, your proven zeal, your admitted social charm which won you favour in the imperial household. O thrice and four times happy man, whose rise means joy to friends, gall to enemies, and glory to your own posterity, to say nothing of the example given to the active and alert, and the spur applied to the listless and the slow. The man who tries to emulate you, be his spirit what it will, may haply owe the last success to his own exertions, but will certainly owe his start to your example. [2] I fancy I see among the envious, with all deference to better citizens be it said, the old miserable arrogance, the old scorn of service affected by men too slack to serve, men lost to all ambition, who crown their cups with sophistries about the charm of a free life out of office, their motive a base indolence, and not the love of the ideal which they pretend. . . .


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. New Testament, Acts, 8.18-8.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.18. Now when Simon saw that the Holy Spirit was given through the laying on of the apostles' hands, he offered them money 8.19. saying, "Give me also this power, that whoever I lay my hands on may receive the Holy Spirit. 8.20. But Peter said to him, "May your silver perish with you, because you thought you could obtain the gift of God with money! 8.21. You have neither part nor lot in this matter, for your heart isn't right before God. 8.22. Repent therefore of this, your wickedness, and ask God if perhaps the thought of your heart may be forgiven you. 8.23. For I see that you are in the gall of bitterness and in the bondage of iniquity. 8.24. Simon answered, "Pray for me to the Lord, that none of the things which you have spoken come on me.
2. New Testament, Luke, 1.5-1.17 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.5. There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the priestly division of Abijah. He had a wife of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. 1.6. They were both righteous before God, walking blamelessly in all the commandments and ordices of the Lord. 1.7. But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren, and they both were well advanced in years. 1.8. Now it happened, while he executed the priest's office before God in the order of his division 1.9. according to the custom of the priest's office, his lot was to enter into the temple of the Lord and burn incense. 1.10. The whole multitude of the people were praying outside at the hour of incense. 1.11. An angel of the Lord appeared to him, standing on the right side of the altar of incense. 1.12. Zacharias was troubled when he saw him, and fear fell upon him. 1.13. But the angel said to him, "Don't be afraid, Zacharias, because your request has been heard, and your wife, Elizabeth, will bear you a son, and you shall call his name John. 1.14. You will have joy and gladness; and many will rejoice at his birth. 1.15. For he will be great in the sight of the Lord, and he will drink no wine nor strong drink. He will be filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mother's womb. 1.16. He will turn many of the children of Israel to the Lord, their God. 1.17. He will go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah, 'to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children,' and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.
3. Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters, 1.1, 1.3-1.8, 1.10-1.11, 2.1, 4.22, 5.5, 5.17, 7.5-7.6, 7.8-7.9, 8.3, 8.9, 8.11, 9.12-9.16 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

4. Epigraphy, Lsam, 72, 59

5. Epigraphy, Lscg, 55, 3

6. Epigraphy, Seg, 54.214

7. Epigraphy, Ig, 12.4.278



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agricola Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 141; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 141
amicitia Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 96, 143; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 96, 143
arvandus Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 141, 152; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 141, 152
auxanius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 143, 152; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 143, 152
barbarians Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 96; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 96
bourges Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 141; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 141
burgundians Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
churches Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 141; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 141
controversy, allusions Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 152; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 152
dating Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
eutropia Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 96; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 96
games Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 102, 142, 152; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 102, 142, 152
graecus Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 96; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 96
law Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 143; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 143
leo (visigothic adviser) Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
lyon Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 141; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 141
majorian Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
mimesis' Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 142
mimesis Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 142
pliny, as a model Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
proculus Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 159; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 159
seneca Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 159; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 159
sidonius, literary style Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 20; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 20
sidonius, persona Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 143, 152, 159; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 143, 152, 159
sidonius, praefectus urbis Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 20, 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 20, 21
simplicius (son of eulogius) Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 152; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 152
syagrius Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21
visigoths, euric Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 143; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 143
visigoths, theodoric ii Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 141; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 141
visigoths Hanghan, Lettered Christians: Christians, Letters, and Late Antique Oxyrhynchus (2019) 21, 96, 141; Hitch, Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world (2017) 21, 96, 141