Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10314
Sextus, Outlines Of Pyrrhonism, 2.31
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

86c. and the soul is a mixture and a harmony of these same elements, when they are well and properly mixed. Now if the soul is a harmony, it is clear that when the body is too much relaxed or is too tightly strung by diseases or other ills, the soul must of necessity perish, no matter how divine it is, like other harmonies in sounds and in all the works of artists, and the remains of each body will endure
2. Aristotle, Soul, 1.4 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Academica, 2.124 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.10.21, 1.11.24, 1.18.41 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 7.34-7.37, 7.261-7.442 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Sextus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, 1.170-1.172, 2.22, 2.26, 2.38-2.42, 2.70 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 9.94 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9.94. We must not assume that what convinces us is actually true. For the same thing does not convince every one, nor even the same people always. Persuasiveness sometimes depends on external circumstances, on the reputation of the speaker, on his ability as a thinker or his artfulness, on the familiarity or the pleasantness of the topic.Again, they would destroy the criterion by reasoning of this kind. Even the criterion has either been critically determined or not. If it has not, it is definitely untrustworthy, and in its purpose of distinguishing is no more true than false. If it has, it will belong to the class of particular judgements, so that one and the same thing determines and is determined, and the criterion which has determined will have to be determined by another, that other by another, and so on ad infinitum.
8. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 7.13 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

7.13. I have made it evident, as I think, that the soul is not subject to dissolution. It remains that I bring forward witnesses by whose authority my arguments may be confirmed. And I will not now allege the testimony of the prophets, whose system and divination consist in this alone, the teaching that man was created for the worship of God, and for receiving immortality from Him; but I will rather bring forward those whom they who reject the truth cannot but believe. Hermes, describing the nature of man, that he might show how he was made by God, introduced this statement: And the same out of two natures- the immortal and the mortal - made one nature, that of man, making the same partly immortal, and partly mortal; and bringing this, he placed it in the midst, between that nature which was divine and immortal, and that which was mortal and changeable, that seeing all things, he may admire all things. But some one may perhaps reckon him in the number of the philosophers, although he has been placed among the gods, and honoured by the Egyptians under the name of Mercury, and may give no more authority to him than to Plato or Pythagoras. Let us therefore seek for greater testimony. A certain Polites asked Apollo of Miletus whether the soul remains after death or goes to dissolution; and he replied in these verses:- As long as the soul is bound by fetters to the body, perceiving corruptible sufferings, it yields to mortal pains; but when, after the wasting of the body, it has found a very swift dissolution of mortality, it is altogether borne into the air, never growing old, and it remains always uninjured; for the first-born providence of God made this disposition.What do the Sibylline poems say? Do they not declare that this is so, when they say that the time will come when God will judge the living and the dead?- whose authority we will hereafter bring forward. Therefore the opinion entertained by Democritus, and Epicurus, and Dic archus concerning the dissolution of the soul is false; and they would not venture to speak concerning the destruction of souls, in the presence of any magician, who knew that souls are called forth from the lower regions by certain incantations, and that they are at hand, and afford themselves to be seen by human eyes, and speak, and foretell future events; and if they should thus venture, they would be overpowered by the fact itself, and by proofs presented to them. But because they did not comprehend the nature of the soul, which is so subtle that it escapes the eyes of the human mind, they said that it perishes. What of Aristoxenus, who denied that there is any soul at all, even while it lives in the body? But as on the lyre harmonious sound, and the strain which musicians call harmony, is produced by the tightening of the strings, so he thought that the power of perception existed in bodies from the joining together of the vitals, and from the vigour of the limbs; than which nothing can be said more senseless. Truly he had his eyes uninjured, but his heart was blind, with which he did not see that he lived, and had the mind by which he had conceived that very thought. But this has happened to many philosophers, that they did not believe in the existence of any object which is not apparent to the eyes; whereas the sight of the mind ought to be much clearer than that of the body, for perceiving those things the force and nature of which are rather felt than seen.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
andronicus of rhodes, aristotelian, soul is either a bodily blend, or a capacity following the blend Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
appearances Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 85
aristotle, soul is not an attunement Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
aristoxenus, aristotelian, soul an attunement Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
body, contribution of body to emotion and its therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
caston, victor Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
criterion Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 85
demonstration Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 85
dicaearchus, aristotelian, soul nothing but an attunement of hot, cold, fluid, dry Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
diogenes laertius Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 85
emotions, per contra, aristotle, galen, emotions cannot be understood without physical basis Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
galen, platonizing ecletic doctor, the mortal soul is that blend Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
plato, for an attunement follows the physical conditions Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
plato, the soul is not a blend, or attunement Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
sextus empiricus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 85
signs Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 126
stoicism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 85
xenocrates, platonist, soul is a numerical ratio Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia)' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 254