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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10314
Sextus, Outlines Of Pyrrhonism, 1.234
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, Academica, 1.13, 1.44, 1.46, 2.7 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.13. Tum ille: 'Istuc quidem considerabo, nec vero sine te. sed de te ipso quid est' inquit quod audio? Quanam inquam de re? VA. Relictam a te veterem Academiam Academiam Bentl. iam *g*d inquit, tractari autem novam. Quid ergo inquam Antiocho id magis licuerit nostro familiari, remigrare in domum veterem e nova, quam nobis in novam e vetere? certe enim recentissima quaeque sunt correcta et emendata maxime. quamquam Antiochi magister Philo, pholo *g magnus vir ut tu existimas estimas vel ex(s)t- *g ipse, †negaret negat Dav. negare solet Pl. in libris, quod coram etiam ex ipso audiebamus, duas Academias esse, erroremque eorum qui ita putarent coarguit. VA. Est inquit ut dicis; sed ignorare te non arbitror quae contra Philonis Antiochus scripserit. scripsit gf 1.44. Tum ego Cum Zenone inquam “ut accepimus Arcesilas sibi omne certamen instituit, non pertinacia aut studio vincendi ut quidem mihi quidem mihi *gp videtur, sed earum rerum obscuritate, quae ad confessionem ignorationis adduxerant Socratem et vel ut iam ante et iam ante Dav. ad Lact. epit. 32 et ueluti amantes *g*d Socratem Democritum Anaxagoram Empedoclem omnes paene veteres, qui nihil cognosci nihil percipi nihil sciri posse dixerunt, angustos sensus imbecillos inbecilles p 1 sgf animos brevia curricula vitae et et om. sgf ut Democritus cf. p. 43, 13 in profundo veritatem esse demersam, demersam gfx dim- smnp m diuersam *d opinionibus et institutis omnia teneri, nihil veritati ueritate *g relinqui, deinceps deinceps denique Bentl. densis IACvHeusde ' Cic. filopla/twn ' ( 1836 ) 236 n. 1 omnia tenebris circumfusa esse dixerunt. cf. Lact. inst. 3, 4, 11. 28, 12 s. 30, 6 Democr. fr. 117 Deiels Emped. fr. 2 D. ( Kranz Herm. 47, 29 n. 2 ) 1.46. Hanc Academiam novam appellant, quae mihi vetus videtur, si quidem Platonem ex illa vetere numeramus, cuius in libris nihil affirmatur et in utramque partem multa disseruntur, de omnibus quaeritur nihil certi dicitur—sed tamen illa quam exposuisti exposuisti Dur. exposui *g*d ; an a Cicerone neglegenter scriptum ? vetus, haec nova nominetur. quae usque ad Carneadem perducta, producta mn (per in ras. p ) qui quartus ab Arcesila fuit, in eadem Arcesilae ratione permansit. Carneades autem nullius philosophiae partis ignarus et, ut cognovi ex is qui illum audierant maximeque ex Epicureo Epicureo ms -ZZZo *g*d Zenone, qui cum ab eo plurimum dissentiret unum tamen praeter ceteros mirabatur, incredibili quadam fuit facultate et to fuit īo facultate et do m 1, īo del. et do ctrina m 2 ; et to om. *dn et co pia dicendi Chr. ” quid autem stomachatur stomachetur Sig. Mnesarchus, quid Antipater digladiatur Non. p. 65 (digladiari) digladiatur F 1 -etur cett. cum Carneade tot voluminibus? *
2. Cicero, On Duties, 2.8 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.8. Quid est igitur, quod me impediat ea, quae probabilia mihi videantur, sequi, quae contra, improbare atque affirmandi arrogantiam vitantem fugere temeritatem, quae a sapientia dissidet plurimum? Contra autem omnia disputatur a nostris, quod hoc ipsum probabile elucere non posset, nisi ex utraque parte causarum esset facta contentio. Sed haec explanata sunt in Academicis nostris satis, ut arbitror, diligenter. Tibi autem, mi Cicero, quamquam in antiquissima nobilissimaque philosophia Cratippo auctore versaris iis simillimo, qui ista praeclara pepererunt, tamen haec nostra finitima vestris ignota esse nolui. Sed iam ad instituta pergamus. 2.8.  What, then, is to hinder me from accepting what seems to me to be probable, while rejecting what seems to be improbable, and from shunning the presumption of dogmatism, while keeping clear of that recklessness of assertion which is as far as possible removed from true wisdom? And as to the fact that our school argues against everything, that is only because we could not get a clear view of what is "probable," unless a comparative estimate were made of all the arguments on both sides. But this subject has been, I think, quite fully set forth in my "Academics." And although, my dear Cicero, you are a student of that most ancient and celebrated school of philosophy, with Cratippus as your master — and he deserves to be classed with the founders of that illustrious sect — still I wish our school, which is closely related to yours, not to be unknown to you. Let us now proceed to the task in hand.
3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 2.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.4. quid futurum putamus, cum adiutore populo, quo utebamur utebamur ex -ntur G 1 antea, nunc minime nos uti posse videamus? est enim philosophia paucis contenta iudicibus, multitudinem consulto ipsa fugiens est philosophia ... 21 fugiens Lact. inst. 3, 25,2 eique ipsi et suspecta et invisa, ut, vel si quis universam velit vituperare, secundo id populo facere possit, vel si in in V 3 in r. eam quam nos maxime sequimur conetur invadere, magna habere possit auxilia e e add. V 2 s om. X a s reliquorum philosophorum disciplinis. est itaque philosophia... 26 disciplinis H Nos autem universae philosophiae vituperatoribus respondimus in Hortensio, pro Academia autem quae dicenda essent, satis accurate in Academicis quattuor libris explicata arbitramur; sed tamen tantum abest ut scribi contra nos nolimus, nolimus ex nolumus R 1 ex uolumus G 1 ut id etiam maxime optemus. in ipsa enim Graecia philosophia tanto ipsa enim Graeciae philosophia tantum Boeth. in honore numquam fuisset, nisi doctissimorum contentionibus dissensionibusque viguisset. viguisset V ( ss. 2 ) cf. praef. crevisset Boeth.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Eternity of The World, 12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. But some say that it was not Aristotle who invented this doctrine, but some of the Pythagoreans; but I have met with a work of Ocellus, a Lucanian by birth, entitled, "A Treatise on the Nature of the Universe," in which he has not only asserted that the world is indestructible, but he has even endeavoured to prove it so by demonstrative proofs. IV.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 47-49, 103 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

103. And besides what has been already said, the growth of men from infancy to old age, when measured by the number seven, displays in a most evident manner its perfecting power; for in the first period of seven years, the putting forth of the teeth takes place. And at the end of the second period of the same length, he arrives at the age of puberty: at the end of the third period, the growth of the beard takes place. The fourth period sees him arrive at the fullness of his manly strength. The fifth seven years is the season for marriage. In the sixth period he arrives at the maturity of his understanding. The seventh period is that of the most rapid improvement and growth of both his intellectual and reasoning powers. The eighth is the sum of the perfection of both. In the ninth, his passions assume a mildness and gentleness, from being to a great degree tamed. In the tenth, the desirable end of life comes upon him, while his limbs and organic senses are still unimpaired: for excessive old age is apt to weaken and enfeeble them all.
7. Sextus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, 1.7, 1.12, 1.209-1.233, 1.235-1.241 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.13-1.16, 9.5, 9.20, 9.61 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9.5. He was exceptional from his boyhood; for when a youth he used to say that he knew nothing, although when he was grown up he claimed that he knew everything. He was nobody's pupil, but he declared that he inquired of himself, and learned everything from himself. Some, however, had said that he had been a pupil of Xenophanes, as we learn from Sotion, who also tells us that Ariston in his book On Heraclitus declares that he was cured of the dropsy and died of another disease. And Hippobotus has the same story.As to the work which passes as his, it is a continuous treatise On Nature, but is divided into three discourses, one on the universe, another on politics, and a third on theology. 9.20. He also said that the mass of things falls short of thought; and again that our encounters with tyrants should be as few, or else as pleasant, as possible. When Empedocles remarked to him that it is impossible to find a wise man, Naturally, he replied, for it takes a wise man to recognize a wise man. Sotion says that he was the first to maintain that all things are incognizable, but Sotion is in error.One of his poems is The Founding of Colophon, and another The Settlement of a Colony at Elea in Italy, making 2000 lines in all. He flourished about the 60th Olympiad. That he buried his sons with his own hands like Anaxagoras is stated by Demetrius of Phalerum in his work On Old Age and by Panaetius the Stoic in his book of Cheerfulness. He is believed to have been sold into slavery by [... and to have been set free by] the Pythagoreans Parmeniscus and Orestades: so Favorinus in the first book of his Memorabilia. There was also another Xenophanes, of Lesbos, an iambic poet.Such were the sporadic philosophers. 9.61. 11. PYRRHOPyrrho of Elis was the son of Pleistarchus, as Diocles relates. According to Apollodorus in his Chronology, he was first a painter; then he studied under Stilpo's son Bryson: thus Alexander in his Successions of Philosophers. Afterwards he joined Anaxarchus, whom he accompanied on his travels everywhere so that he even forgathered with the Indian Gymnosophists and with the Magi. This led him to adopt a most noble philosophy, to quote Ascanius of Abdera, taking the form of agnosticism and suspension of judgement. He denied that anything was honourable or dishonourable, just or unjust. And so, universally, he held that there is nothing really existent, but custom and convention govern human action; for no single thing is in itself any more this than that.
9. Augustine, Contra Academicos, 3.38 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academy, new Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
academy, old Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
academy Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
aenesidemus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
alexandria Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
antiochus of ascalon Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
arcesilaus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 41; Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
aristo Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
cicero (academic allegiance) Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
cosmogony Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
cyrenaics Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25
democritus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25
diogenes laertius Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9, 112
dogmatism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
empiric school of medicine Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25, 41
ethics Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
extension in three dimensions Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
functions of soul (kinetic, cognitive, ontological) Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
harmony Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
heraclitus Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
indivisible and divisible being Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
investigation Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
logic Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
methodic school of medicine Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 41
mixtures Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
peripatetics Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
philo of alexandria Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
physics Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
protagoras Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25
pyrrho Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
pyrrhonism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9, 112
pyrrhonists Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
pythagoras/pythagoreans Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
same and different Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
satire Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
sextus empiricus Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
skepticism, academic Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25, 41
skepticism, academic skepticism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
skepticism, pyrrhonian skepticism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
skepticism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9, 112
skeptics, academic Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
skeptics Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 9
sotion Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112
stoics Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 61
tetraktys (tetrad, numbers one to four)' Inwood and Warren, Body and Soul in Hellenistic Philosophy (2020) 198
xenophanes Bett, How to be a Pyrrhonist: The Practice and Significance of Pyrrhonian Scepticism (2019) 25; Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 112