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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10313
Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 11.73
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Xenophon, Symposium, 4.34-4.35, 4.41-4.42 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.34. Come, now, Antisthenes, said Socrates , take your turn and tell us how it is that with such slender means you base your pride on wealth. Because, sirs, I conceive that people’s wealth and poverty are to be found not in their real estate but in their hearts. 4.35. For I see many persons, not in office, who though possessors of large resources, yet look upon themselves as so poor that they bend their backs to any toil, any risk, if only they may increase their holdings; and again I know of brothers, with equal shares in their inheritance, where one of them has plenty, and more than enough to meet expenses, while the other is in utter want. 4.41. For whenever I feel an inclination to indulge my appetite, I do not buy fancy articles at the market (for they come high), but I draw on the store-house of my soul. And it goes a long way farther toward producing enjoyment when I take food only after awaiting the craving for it than when I partake of one of these fancy dishes, like this fine Thasian wine that fortune has put in my way and I am drinking without the promptings of thirst. 4.42. Yes, and it is natural that those whose eyes are set on frugality should be more honest than those whose eyes are fixed on money-making. For those who are most contented with what they have are least likely to covet what belongs to others.
2. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 10.310-10.350, 11.14, 11.22-11.26, 11.45, 11.61-11.67, 11.110-11.161 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.86, 6.2-6.3, 9.101 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.86. The case stands thus. The disciples of Aristippus were his daughter Arete, Aethiops of Ptolemais, and Antipater of Cyrene. The pupil of Arete was Aristippus, who went by the name of mother-taught, and his pupil was Theodorus, known as the atheist, subsequently as god. Antipater's pupil was Epitimides of Cyrene, his was Paraebates, and he had as pupils Hegesias, the advocate of suicide, and Anniceris, who ransomed Plato.Those then who adhered to the teaching of Aristippus and were known as Cyrenaics held the following opinions. They laid down that there are two states, pleasure and pain, the former a smooth, the latter a rough motion, and that pleasure does not differ from pleasure nor is one pleasure more pleasant than another. 6.2. To begin with, he became a pupil of Gorgias the rhetorician, and hence the rhetorical style that he introduces in his dialogues, and especially in his Truth and in his Exhortations. According to Hermippus he intended at the public gathering for the Isthmian games to discourse on the faults and merits of Athenians, Thebans and Lacedaemonians, but begged to be excused when he saw throngs arriving from those cities.Later on, however, he came into touch with Socrates, and derived so much benefit from him that he used to advise his own disciples to become fellow-pupils with him of Socrates. He lived in the Peiraeus, and every day would tramp the five miles to Athens in order to hear Socrates. From Socrates he learned his hardihood, emulating his disregard of feeling, and thus he inaugurated the Cynic way of life. He demonstrated that pain is a good thing by instancing the great Heracles and Cyrus, drawing the one example from the Greek world and the other from the barbarians. 6.3. He was the first to define statement (or assertion) by saying that a statement is that which sets forth what a thing was or is. He used repeatedly to say, I'd rather be mad than feel pleasure, and We ought to make love to such women as will feel a proper gratitude. When a lad from Pontus was about to attend his lectures, and asked him what he required, the answer was, Come with a new book, a new pen, and new tablets, if you have a mind to (implying the need of brains as well). When someone inquired what sort of wife he ought to marry, he said, If she's beautiful, you'll not have her to yourself; if she's ugly, you'll pay for it dearly. Being told that Plato was abusing him, he remarked, It is a royal privilege to do good and be ill spoken of. 9.101. There is nothing good or bad by nature, for if there is anything good or bad by nature, it must be good or bad for all persons alike, just as snow is cold to all. But there is no good or bad which is such to all persons in common; therefore there is no such thing as good or bad by nature. For either all that is thought good by anyone whatever must be called good, or not all. Certainly all cannot be so called; since one and the same thing is thought good by one person and bad by another; for instance, Epicurus thought pleasure good and Antisthenes thought it bad; thus on our supposition it will follow that the same thing is both good and bad. But if we say that not all that anyone thinks good is good, we shall have to judge the different opinions; and this is impossible because of the equal validity of opposing arguments. Therefore the good by nature is unknowable.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antisthenes, and aristippus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
antisthenes, and rejection of pleasure Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
antisthenes, post-classical reception Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
antisthenes, xenophons portrayal of Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
antisthenes Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 90; Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
aristippus of cyrene, antisthenes and Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
aristippus of cyrene Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
being (coming into) Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 90
diogenes laertius Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 90, 94
epicurus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 90
good / bad Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 90, 94, 95
pleasure (ἡδονή\u200e), in antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
pyrrho Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
pyrrhonism Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 94, 95
sextus empiricus Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 90, 94
skepticism Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
suspension of judgment' Vogt, Pyrrhonian Skepticism in Diogenes Laertius (2015) 94
symposia Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
toils (ponoi) Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
truth (alētheia), skepticism and Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330
xenophon, portrayal of antisthenes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 330