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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



673
Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 10.12-10.18


nanThe beginning of mans pride is to depart from the Lord;his heart has forsaken his Maker.


nanThere is another who is slow and needs help,who lacks strength and abounds in poverty;but the eyes of the Lord look upon him for his good;he lifts him out of his low estate


nanFor the beginning of pride is sin,and the man who clings to it pours out abominations. Therefore the Lord brought upon them extraordinary afflictions,and destroyed them utterly.


nanand raises up his head,so that many are amazed at him.


nanThe Lord has cast down the thrones of rulers,and has seated the lowly in their place.


nanGood things and bad, life and death,poverty and wealth, come from the Lord.


nanThe Lord has plucked up the roots of the nations,and has planted the humble in their place.


nanThe Lord has overthrown the lands of the nations,and has destroyed them to the foundations of the earth.


nanHe has removed some of them and destroyed them,and has extinguished the memory of them from the earth.


nanThe gift of the Lord endures for those who are godly,and what he approves will have lasting success.


nanPride was not created for men,nor fierce anger for those born of women.


nanThere is a man who is rich through his diligence and self-denial,and this is the reward allotted to him:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 18.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18.20. But the prophet, that shall speak a word presumptuously in My name, which I have not commanded him to speak, or that shall speak in the name of other gods, that same prophet shall die.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Job, 1.21 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.21. וַיֹּאמֶר עָרֹם יצתי [יָצָאתִי] מִבֶּטֶן אִמִּי וְעָרֹם אָשׁוּב שָׁמָה יְהוָה נָתַן וַיהוָה לָקָח יְהִי שֵׁם יְהוָה מְבֹרָךְ׃ 1.21. And he said; Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, And naked shall I return thither; The LORD gave, and the LORD hath taken away; Blessed be the name of the LORD."
3. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 11.7, 23.4-23.5, 27.23-27.24 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

11.7. בְּמוֹת אָדָם רָשָׁע תֹּאבַד תִּקְוָה וְתוֹחֶלֶת אוֹנִים אָבָדָה׃ 23.4. אַל־תִּיגַע לְהַעֲשִׁיר מִבִּינָתְךָ חֲדָל׃ 23.5. התעוף [הֲתָעִיף] עֵינֶיךָ בּוֹ וְאֵינֶנּוּ כִּי עָשֹׂה יַעֲשֶׂה־לּוֹ כְנָפַיִם כְּנֶשֶׁר ועיף [יָעוּף] הַשָּׁמָיִם׃ 27.23. יָדֹעַ תֵּדַע פְּנֵי צֹאנֶךָ שִׁית לִבְּךָ לַעֲדָרִים׃ 27.24. כִּי לֹא לְעוֹלָם חֹסֶן וְאִם־נֵזֶר לְדוֹר דור [וָדוֹר׃] 11.7. When a wicked man dieth, his expectation shall perish, And the hope of strength perisheth." 23.4. Weary not thyself to be rich; Cease from thine own wisdom. ." 23.5. Wilt thou set thine eyes upon it? it is gone; For riches certainly make themselves wings, Like an eagle that flieth toward heaven." 27.23. Be thou diligent to know the state of thy flocks, And look well to thy herds;" 27.24. For riches are not for ever; And doth the crown endure unto all generations?"
4. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 37.7, 49.16-49.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

37.7. דּוֹם לַיהוָה וְהִתְחוֹלֵל לוֹ אַל־תִּתְחַר בְּמַצְלִיחַ דַּרְכּוֹ בְּאִישׁ עֹשֶׂה מְזִמּוֹת׃ 49.16. אַךְ־אֱלֹהִים יִפְדֶּה נַפְשִׁי מִיַּד־שְׁאוֹל כִּי יִקָּחֵנִי סֶלָה׃ 49.17. אַל־תִּירָא כִּי־יַעֲשִׁר אִישׁ כִּי־יִרְבֶּה כְּבוֹד בֵּיתוֹ׃ 37.7. Resign thyself unto the LORD, and wait patiently for Him; fret not thyself because of him who prospereth in his way, because of the man who bringeth wicked devices to pass." 49.16. But God will redeem my soul from the power of the nether-world; For He shall receive me. Selah" 49.17. Be not thou afraid when one waxeth rich, When the wealth of his house is increased;"
5. Hebrew Bible, Ecclesiastes, 5.15 (5th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5.15. וְגַם־זֹה רָעָה חוֹלָה כָּל־עֻמַּת שֶׁבָּא כֵּן יֵלֵךְ וּמַה־יִּתְרוֹן לוֹ שֶׁיַּעֲמֹל לָרוּחַ׃ 5.15. And this also is a grievous evil, that in all points as he came, so shall he go; and what profit hath he that he laboureth for the wind?"
6. Anon., 1 Enoch, 94.8 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

94.8. Woe to you, ye rich, for ye have trusted in your riches, And from your riches shall ye depart, Because ye have not remembered the Most High in the days of your riches.
7. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 4.1-4.10, 5.8, 8.2, 9.10-9.16, 10.3-10.5, 10.9-10.11, 10.13-10.18, 10.26-10.27, 10.30-10.31, 11.10, 11.12, 11.14, 11.17-11.28, 12.4, 12.10-12.12, 12.14, 12.16, 13.1-13.4, 13.7, 13.9-13.13, 13.15-13.24, 14.16, 15.7, 16.1-16.4, 19.2-19.3, 31.1-31.7, 34.24-34.27 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4.1. My son, deprive not the poor of his living,and do not keep needy eyes waiting. 4.1. Be like a father to orphans,and instead of a husband to their mother;you will then be like a son of the Most High,and he will love you more than does your mother. 4.2. Do not grieve the one who is hungry,nor anger a man in want. 4.2. Observe the right time, and beware of evil;and do not bring shame on yourself. 4.3. Do not add to the troubles of an angry mind,nor delay your gift to a beggar. 4.3. Do not be like a lion in your home,nor be a faultfinder with your servants. 4.4. Do not reject an afflicted suppliant,nor turn your face away from the poor. 4.5. Do not avert your eye from the needy,nor give a man occasion to curse you; 4.6. for if in bitterness of soul he calls down a curse upon you,his Creator will hear his prayer. 4.7. Make yourself beloved in the congregation;bow your head low to a great man. 4.8. Incline your ear to the poor,and answer him peaceably and gently. 4.9. Deliver him who is wronged from the hand of the wrongdoer;and do not be fainthearted in judging a case. 5.8. Do not depend on dishonest wealth,for it will not benefit you in the day of calamity. 5.8. For there is a friend who is such at his own convenience,but will not stand by you in your day of trouble. 8.2. Do not quarrel with a rich man,lest his resources outweigh yours;for gold has ruined many,and has perverted the minds of kings. 9.11. Do not envy the honors of a sinner,for you do not know what his end will be. 9.12. Do not delight in what pleases the ungodly;remember that they will not be held guiltless as long as they live. 9.13. Keep far from a man who has the power to kill,and you will not be worried by the fear of death. But if you approach him, make no misstep,lest he rob you of your life. Know that you are walking in the midst of snares,and that you are going about on the city battlements. 9.14. As much as you can, aim to know your neighbors,and consult with the wise. 9.15. Let your conversation be with men of understanding,and let all your discussion be about the law of the Most High. 9.16. Let righteous men be your dinner companions,and let your glorying be in the fear of the Lord. 10.3. An undisciplined king will ruin his people,but a city will grow through the understanding of its rulers. 10.3. A poor man is honored for his knowledge,while a rich man is honored for his wealth. 10.3. The bee is small among flying creatures,but her product is the best of sweet things. 10.3. Like a decoy partridge in a cage, so is the mind of a proud man,and like a spy he observes your weakness; 10.4. The government of the earth is in the hands of the Lord,and over it he will raise up the right man for the time. 10.4. Do not boast about wearing fine clothes,nor exalt yourself in the day that you are honored;for the works of the Lord are wonderful,and his works are concealed from men. 10.5. The success of a man is in the hands of the Lord,and he confers his honor upon the person of the scribe. 10.5. Many kings have had to sit on the ground,but one who was never thought of has worn a crown. 10.9. How can he who is dust and ashes be proud?for even in life his bowels decay. 10.9. Do not argue about a matter which does not concern you,nor sit with sinners when they judge a case. 10.11. For when a man is dead,he will inherit creeping things, and wild beasts, and worms. 10.11. There is a man who works, and toils, and presses on,but is so much the more in want. 10.13. For the beginning of pride is sin,and the man who clings to it pours out abominations. Therefore the Lord brought upon them extraordinary afflictions,and destroyed them utterly. 10.13. and raises up his head,so that many are amazed at him. 10.14. The Lord has cast down the thrones of rulers,and has seated the lowly in their place. 10.14. Good things and bad, life and death,poverty and wealth, come from the Lord. 10.15. The Lord has plucked up the roots of the nations,and has planted the humble in their place. 10.16. The Lord has overthrown the lands of the nations,and has destroyed them to the foundations of the earth. 10.17. He has removed some of them and destroyed them,and has extinguished the memory of them from the earth. 10.17. The gift of the Lord endures for those who are godly,and what he approves will have lasting success. 10.18. Pride was not created for men,nor fierce anger for those born of women. 10.18. There is a man who is rich through his diligence and self-denial,and this is the reward allotted to him: 10.26. Do not make a display of your wisdom when you do your work,nor glorify yourself at a time when you are in want. 10.26. For it is easy in the sight of the Lord to reward a man on the day of death according to his conduct. 10.27. Better is a man who works and has an abundance of everything,than one who goes about boasting, but lacks bread. 10.27. The misery of an hour makes one forget luxury,and at the close of a mans life his deeds will be revealed. 10.31. A man honored in poverty, how much more in wealth!And a man dishonored in wealth, how much more in poverty!Sir.11 10.31. for he lies in wait, turning good into evil,and to worthy actions he will attach blame. 12.4. Give to the godly man, but do not help the sinner. 12.11. Even if he humbles himself and goes about cringing,watch yourself, and be on your guard against him;and you will be to him like one who has polished a mirror,and you will know that it was not hopelessly tarnished. 12.12. Do not put him next to you,lest he overthrow you and take your place;do not have him sit at your right,lest he try to take your seat of honor,and at last you will realize the truth of my words,and be stung by what I have said. 12.14. So no one will pity a man who associates with a sinner and becomes involved in his sins. 12.16. An enemy will speak sweetly with his lips,but in his mind he will plan to throw you into a pit;an enemy will weep with his eyes,but if he finds an opportunity his thirst for blood will be insatiable. 13.1. Whoever touches pitch will be defiled,and whoever associates with a proud man will become like him. 13.1. Do not push forward, lest you be repulsed;and do not remain at a distance, lest you be forgotten. 13.2. Do not lift a weight beyond your strength,nor associate with a man mightier and richer than you. How can the clay pot associate with the iron kettle?The pot will strike against it, and will itself be broken. 13.2. Humility is an abomination to a proud man;likewise a poor man is an abomination to a rich one. 13.3. A rich man does wrong, and he even adds reproaches;a poor man suffers wrong, and he must add apologies. 13.4. A rich man will exploit you if you can be of use to him,but if you are in need he will forsake you. 13.7. He will shame you with his foods,until he has drained you two or three times;and finally he will deride you. Should he see you afterwards, he will forsake you,and shake his head at you. 13.9. When a powerful man invites you, be reserved;and he will invite you the more often. 13.11. Do not try to treat him as an equal,nor trust his abundance of words;for he will test you through much talk,and while he smiles he will be examining you. 13.12. Cruel is he who does not keep words to himself;he will not hesitate to injure or to imprison. 13.13. Keep words to yourself and be very watchful,for you are walking about with your own downfall. 13.15. Every creature loves its like,and every person his neighbor; 13.16. all living beings associate by species,and a man clings to one like himself. 13.17. What fellowship has a wolf with a lamb?No more has a sinner with a godly man. 13.18. What peace is there between a hyena and a dog?And what peace between a rich man and a poor man? 13.19. Wild asses in the wilderness are the prey of lions;likewise the poor are pastures for the rich. 13.21. When a rich man totters, he is steadied by friends,but when a humble man falls, he is even pushed away by friends. 13.22. If a rich man slips, his helpers are many;he speaks unseemly words, and they justify him. If a humble man slips, they even reproach him;he speaks sensibly, and receives no attention. 13.23. When the rich man speaks all are silent,and they extol to the clouds what he says. When the poor man speaks they say, "Who is this fellow?" And should he stumble, they even push him down. 13.24. Riches are good if they are free from sin,and poverty is evil in the opinion of the ungodly. 14.16. Give, and take, and beguile yourself,because in Hades one cannot look for luxury. 15.7. Foolish men will not obtain her,and sinful men will not see her. 16.1. Do not desire a multitude of useless children,nor rejoice in ungodly sons. 16.1. nor for the six hundred thousand men on foot,who rebelliously assembled in their stubbornness. 16.2. If they multiply, do not rejoice in them,unless the fear of the Lord is in them. 16.2. And no mind will reflect on this. Who will ponder his ways? 16.3. Do not trust in their survival,and do not rely on their multitude;for one is better than a thousand,and to die childless is better than to have ungodly children. 16.3. with all kinds of living beings he covered its surface,and to it they return. 16.4. For through one man of understanding a city will be filled with people,but through a tribe of lawless men it will be made desolate. 19.2. Wine and women lead intelligent men astray,and the man who consorts with harlots is very reckless. 19.2. All wisdom is the fear of the Lord,and in all wisdom there is the fulfilment of the law. 19.3. Decay and worms will inherit him,and the reckless soul will be snatched away. 19.3. A mans attire and open-mouthed laughter,and a mans manner of walking, show what he is. 31.1. Wakefulness over wealth wastes away ones flesh,and anxiety about it removes sleep. 31.1. Who has been tested by it and been found perfect?Let it be for him a ground for boasting. Who has had the power to transgress and did not transgress,and to do evil and did not do it? 31.2. Wakeful anxiety prevents slumber,and a severe illness carries off sleep. 31.2. Healthy sleep depends on moderate eating;he rises early, and feels fit. The distress of sleeplessness and of nausea and colic are with the glutton. 31.3. The rich man toils as his wealth accumulates,and when he rests he fills himself with his dainties. 31.3. Drunkenness increases the anger of a fool to his injury,reducing his strength and adding wounds. 31.4. The poor man toils as his livelihood diminishes,and when he rests he becomes needy. 31.5. He who loves gold will not be justified,and he who pursues money will be led astray by it. 31.6. Many have come to ruin because of gold,and their destruction has met them face to face. 31.7. It is a stumbling block to those who are devoted to it,and every fool will be taken captive by it. 34.24. When one prays and another curses,to whose voice will the Lord listen? 34.25. If a man washes after touching a dead body,and touches it again,what has he gained by his washing? 34.26. So if a man fasts for his sins,and goes again and does the same things,who will listen to his prayer?And what has he gained by humbling himself?
8. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 6.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.7. For we brought nothing into the world, and we certainly can't carry anything out.
9. New Testament, Matthew, 25.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

25.41. Then he will say also to those on the left hand, 'Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire which is prepared for the devil and his angels;
10. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 102.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Augustine, De Sancta Virginitate, 31.31 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

12. Augustine, The City of God, 11.15, 12.8, 19.12 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

11.15. As for what John says about the devil, The devil sins from the beginning 1 John 3:8 they who suppose it is meant hereby that the devil was made with a sinful nature, misunderstand it; for if sin be natural, it is not sin at all. And how do they answer the prophetic proofs - either what Isaiah says when he represents the devil under the person of the king of Babylon, How are you fallen, O Lucifer, son of the morning! Isaiah 14:12 or what Ezekiel says, You have been in Eden, the garden of God; every precious stone was your covering, Ezekiel 28:13 where it is meant that he was some time without sin; for a little after it is still more explicitly said, You were perfect in your ways? And if these passages cannot well be otherwise interpreted, we must understand by this one also, He abode not in the truth, that he was once in the truth, but did not remain in it. And from this passage, The devil sins from the beginning, it is not to be supposed that he sinned from the beginning of his created existence, but from the beginning of his sin, when by his pride he had once commenced to sin. There is a passage, too, in the Book of Job, of which the devil is the subject: This is the beginning of the creation of God, which He made to be a sport to His angels, which agrees with the psalm, where it is said, There is that dragon which You have made to be a sport therein. But these passages are not to lead us to suppose that the devil was originally created to be the sport of the angels, but that he was doomed to this punishment after his sin. His beginning, then, is the handiwork of God; for there is no nature, even among the least, and lowest, and last of the beasts, which was not the work of Him from whom has proceeded all measure, all form, all order, without which nothing can be planned or conceived. How much more, then, is this angelic nature, which surpasses in dignity all else that He has made, the handiwork of the Most High! 12.8. This I do know, that the nature of God can never, nowhere, nowise be defective, and that natures made of nothing can. These latter, however, the more being they have, and the more good they do (for then they do something positive), the more they have efficient causes; but in so far as they are defective in being, and consequently do evil (for then what is their work but vanity?), they have deficient causes. And I know likewise, that the will could not become evil, were it unwilling to become so; and therefore its failings are justly punished, being not necessary, but voluntary. For its defections are not to evil things, but are themselves evil; that is to say, are not towards things that are naturally and in themselves evil, but the defection of the will is evil, because it is contrary to the order of nature, and an abandonment of that which has supreme being for that which has less. For avarice is not a fault inherent in gold, but in the man who inordinately loves gold, to the detriment of justice, which ought to be held in incomparably higher regard than gold. Neither is luxury the fault of lovely and charming objects, but of the heart that inordinately loves sensual pleasures, to the neglect of temperance, which attaches us to objects more lovely in their spirituality, and more delectable by their incorruptibility. Nor yet is boasting the fault of human praise, but of the soul that is inordinately fond of the applause of men, and that makes light of the voice of conscience. Pride, too, is not the fault of him who delegates power, nor of power itself, but of the soul that is inordinately enamored of its own power, and despises the more just dominion of a higher authority. Consequently he who inordinately loves the good which any nature possesses, even though he obtain it, himself becomes evil in the good, and wretched because deprived of a greater good. 19.12. Whoever gives even moderate attention to human affairs and to our common nature, will recognize that if there is no man who does not wish to be joyful, neither is there any one who does not wish to have peace. For even they who make war desire nothing but victory - desire, that is to say, to attain to peace with glory. For what else is victory than the conquest of those who resist us? And when this is done there is peace. It is therefore with the desire for peace that wars are waged, even by those who take pleasure in exercising their warlike nature in command and battle. And hence it is obvious that peace is the end sought for by war. For every man seeks peace by waging war, but no man seeks war by making peace. For even they who intentionally interrupt the peace in which they are living have no hatred of peace, but only wish it changed into a peace that suits them better. They do not, therefore, wish to have no peace, but only one more to their mind. And in the case of sedition, when men have separated themselves from the community, they yet do not effect what they wish, unless they maintain some kind of peace with their fellow-conspirators. And therefore even robbers take care to maintain peace with their comrades, that they may with greater effect and greater safety invade the peace of other men. And if an individual happen to be of such unrivalled strength, and to be so jealous of partnership, that he trusts himself with no comrades, but makes his own plots, and commits depredations and murders on his own account, yet he maintains some shadow of peace with such persons as he is unable to kill, and from whom he wishes to conceal his deeds. In his own home, too, he makes it his aim to be at peace with his wife and children, and any other members of his household; for unquestionably their prompt obedience to his every look is a source of pleasure to him. And if this be not rendered, he is angry, he chides and punishes; and even by this storm he secures the calm peace of his own home, as occasion demands. For he sees that peace cannot be maintained unless all the members of the same domestic circle be subject to one head, such as he himself is in his own house. And therefore if a city or nation offered to submit itself to him, to serve him in the same style as he had made his household serve him, he would no longer lurk in a brigand's hiding-places, but lift his head in open day as a king, though the same coveteousness and wicked ness should remain in him. And thus all men desire to have peace with their own circle whom they wish to govern as suits themselves. For even those whom they make war against they wish to make their own, and impose on them the laws of their own peace. But let us suppose a man such as poetry and mythology speak of - a man so insociable and savage as to be called rather a semi-man than a man. Although, then, his kingdom was the solitude of a dreary cave, and he himself was so singularly bad-hearted that he was named Κακός, which is the Greek word for bad; though he had no wife to soothe him with endearing talk, no children to play with, no sons to do his bidding, no friend to enliven him with intercourse, not even his father Vulcan (though in one respect he was happier than his father, not having begotten a monster like himself); although he gave to no man, but took as he wished whatever he could, from whomsoever he could, when he could yet in that solitary den, the floor of which, as Virgil says, was always reeking with recent slaughter, there was nothing else than peace sought, a peace in which no one should molest him, or disquiet him with any assault or alarm. With his own body he desired to be at peace, and he was satisfied only in proportion as he had this peace. For he ruled his members, and they obeyed him; and for the sake of pacifying his mortal nature, which rebelled when it needed anything, and of allaying the sedition of hunger which threatened to banish the soul from the body, he made forays, slew, and devoured, but used the ferocity and savageness he displayed in these actions only for the preservation of his own life's peace. So that, had he been willing to make with other men the same peace which he made with himself in his own cave, he would neither have been called bad, nor a monster, nor a semi-man. Or if the appearance of his body and his vomiting smoky fires frightened men from having any dealings with him, perhaps his fierce ways arose not from a desire to do mischief, but from the necessity of finding a living. But he may have had no existence, or, at least, he was not such as the poets fancifully describe him, for they had to exalt Hercules, and did so at the expense of Cacus. It is better, then, to believe that such a man or semi-man never existed, and that this, in common with many other fancies of the poets, is mere fiction. For the most savage animals (and he is said to have been almost a wild beast) encompass their own species with a ring of protecting peace. They cohabit, beget, produce, suckle, and bring up their young, though very many of them are not gregarious, but solitary - not like sheep, deer, pigeons, starlings, bees, but such as lions, foxes, eagles, bats. For what tigress does not gently purr over her cubs, and lay aside her ferocity to fondle them? What kite, solitary as he is when circling over his prey, does not seek a mate, build a nest, hatch the eggs, bring up the young birds, and maintain with the mother of his family as peaceful a domestic alliance as he can? How much more powerfully do the laws of man's nature move him to hold fellowship and maintain peace with all men so far as in him lies, since even wicked men wage war to maintain the peace of their own circle, and wish that, if possible, all men belonged to them, that all men and things might serve but one head, and might, either through love or fear, yield themselves to peace with him! It is thus that pride in its perversity apes God. It abhors equality with other men under Him; but, instead of His rule, it seeks to impose a rule of its own upon its equals. It abhors, that is to say, the just peace of God, and loves its own unjust peace; but it cannot help loving peace of one kind or other. For there is no vice so clean contrary to nature that it obliterates even the faintest traces of nature. He, then, who prefers what is right to what is wrong, and what is well-ordered to what is perverted, sees that the peace of unjust men is not worthy to be called peace in comparison with the peace of the just. And yet even what is perverted must of necessity be in harmony with, and in dependence on, and in some part of the order of things, for otherwise it would have no existence at all. Suppose a man hangs with his head downwards, this is certainly a perverted attitude of body and arrangement of its members; for that which nature requires to be above is beneath, and vice versâ. This perversity disturbs the peace of the body, and is therefore painful. Nevertheless the spirit is at peace with its body, and labors for its preservation, and hence the suffering; but if it is banished from the body by its pains, then, so long as the bodily framework holds together, there is in the remains a kind of peace among the members, and hence the body remains suspended. And inasmuch as the earthly body tends towards the earth, and rests on the bond by which it is suspended, it tends thus to its natural peace, and the voice of its own weight demands a place for it to rest; and though now lifeless and without feeling, it does not fall from the peace that is natural to its place in creation, whether it already has it, or is tending towards it. For if you apply embalming preparations to prevent the bodily frame from mouldering and dissolving, a kind of peace still unites part to part, and keeps the whole body in a suitable place on the earth - in other words, in a place that is at peace with the body. If, on the other hand, the body receive no such care, but be left to the natural course, it is disturbed by exhalations that do not harmonize with one another, and that offend our senses; for it is this which is perceived in putrefaction until it is assimilated to the elements of the world, and particle by particle enters into peace with them. Yet throughout this process the laws of the most high Creator and Governor are strictly observed, for it is by Him the peace of the universe is administered. For although minute animals are produced from the carcass of a larger animal, all these little atoms, by the law of the same Creator, serve the animals they belong to in peace. And although the flesh of dead animals be eaten by others, no matter where it be carried, nor what it be brought into contact with, nor what it be converted and changed into, it still is ruled by the same laws which pervade all things for the conservation of every mortal race, and which bring things that fit one another into harmony.
13. Pseudo-Phocylides, The Sentences of Pseudo-Phocylides, 110



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
cattle, as possessions Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
children Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
death, of sinners Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
death Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
demons, fall of Wiebe, Fallen Angels in the Theology of St Augustine (2021) 59
envy Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
evil, as perverted imitation of god Wiebe, Fallen Angels in the Theology of St Augustine (2021) 59
evil Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
fear Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
fear of god Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
glory Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
god, most high Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
god Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101, 140
hades Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
heart Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
hellenism/hellenization Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
jerusalem Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
law of moses Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
life / afterlife Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
mountains Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
palestine Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
parallelism Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
poor Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
pride, vs. envy Wiebe, Fallen Angels in the Theology of St Augustine (2021) 59
pride Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101, 140; Wiebe, Fallen Angels in the Theology of St Augustine (2021) 59
priesthood Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
prophets Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
prosperity Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
ptolemies Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
remember Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
rich Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
rulers Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
sacrifice Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
sapiential (wisdom) literature Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
satan, scribe, retainer class of Mathews, Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John (2013) 70
seleucids Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
sheol Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
sin/sinners Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
taxation Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
theology, of retribution Mathews, Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John (2013) 70
tobiads Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 140
waters Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
wealth/prosperity Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
wealth Mathews, Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful: Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John (2013) 70
wife Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
wisdom/wise Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101
wisdom Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
woman/women, mothers' Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 264
word-pairs Corley, Ben Sira's Teaching on Friendship (2002) 101