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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5833
Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 8.9


nanBut if by disobedience you rouse my anger, you will compel me to destroy each and every one of you with dreadful punishments through tortures.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 6.15 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6.15. כִּי אֵל קַנָּא יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בְּקִרְבֶּךָ פֶּן־יֶחֱרֶה אַף־יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בָּךְ וְהִשְׁמִידְךָ מֵעַל פְּנֵי הָאֲדָמָה׃ 6.15. for a jealous God, even the LORD thy God, is in the midst of thee; lest the anger of the LORD thy God be kindled against thee, and He destroy thee from off the face of the earth."
2. Hebrew Bible, Esther, 1.12 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.12. וַתְּמָאֵן הַמַּלְכָּה וַשְׁתִּי לָבוֹא בִּדְבַר הַמֶּלֶךְ אֲשֶׁר בְּיַד הַסָּרִיסִים וַיִּקְצֹף הַמֶּלֶךְ מְאֹד וַחֲמָתוֹ בָּעֲרָה בוֹ׃ 1.12. But the queen Vashti refused to come at the king’s commandment by the chamberlains; therefore was the king very wroth, and his anger burned in him."
3. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 32.10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

32.10. Now therefore let Me alone, that My wrath may wax hot against them, and that I may consume them; and I will make of thee a great nation.’"
4. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 40.2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

40.2. וַיְהִי בַּיּוֹם הַשְּׁלִישִׁי יוֹם הֻלֶּדֶת אֶת־פַּרְעֹה וַיַּעַשׂ מִשְׁתֶּה לְכָל־עֲבָדָיו וַיִּשָּׂא אֶת־רֹאשׁ שַׂר הַמַּשְׁקִים וְאֶת־רֹאשׁ שַׂר הָאֹפִים בְּתוֹךְ עֲבָדָיו׃ 40.2. וַיִּקְצֹף פַּרְעֹה עַל שְׁנֵי סָרִיסָיו עַל שַׂר הַמַּשְׁקִים וְעַל שַׂר הָאוֹפִים׃ 40.2. And Pharaoh was wroth against his two officers, against the chief of the butlers, and against the chief of the bakers."
5. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 11.1, 24.10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

11.1. וַיְהִי הָעָם כְּמִתְאֹנְנִים רַע בְּאָזְנֵי יְהוָה וַיִּשְׁמַע יְהוָה וַיִּחַר אַפּוֹ וַתִּבְעַר־בָּם אֵשׁ יְהוָה וַתֹּאכַל בִּקְצֵה הַמַּחֲנֶה׃ 11.1. וַיִּשְׁמַע מֹשֶׁה אֶת־הָעָם בֹּכֶה לְמִשְׁפְּחֹתָיו אִישׁ לְפֶתַח אָהֳלוֹ וַיִּחַר־אַף יְהוָה מְאֹד וּבְעֵינֵי מֹשֶׁה רָע׃ 11.1. And the people were as murmurers, speaking evil in the ears of the LORD; and when the LORD heard it, His anger was kindled; and the fire of the LORD burnt among them, and devoured in the uttermost part of the camp." 24.10. And Balak’s anger was kindled against Balaam, and he smote his hands together; and Balak said unto Balaam: ‘I called thee to curse mine enemies, and, behold, thou hast altogether blessed them these three times."
6. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 16.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16.14. חֲמַת־מֶלֶךְ מַלְאֲכֵי־מָוֶת וְאִישׁ חָכָם יְכַפְּרֶנָּה׃ 16.14. The wrath of a king is as messengers of death; But a wise man will pacify it."
7. Hebrew Bible, Ruth, 1.21 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.21. אֲנִי מְלֵאָה הָלַכְתִּי וְרֵיקָם הֱשִׁיבַנִי יְהוָה לָמָּה תִקְרֶאנָה לִי נָעֳמִי וַיהוָה עָנָה בִי וְשַׁדַּי הֵרַע לִי׃ 1.21. I went out full, and the LORD hath brought me back home empty; why call ye me Naomi, seeing the LORD hath testified against me, and the Almighty hath afflicted me?’"
8. Hebrew Bible, 1 Samuel, 20.30 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20.30. Then Sha᾽ul’s anger burned against Yehonatan, and he said to him, Thou perverse and rebellious son, do not I know that thou hast chosen the son of Yishay to thine own disgrace, and to the disgrace of thy mother’s nakedness?"
9. Hebrew Bible, 2 Samuel, 12.25 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12.25. וַיִּשְׁלַח בְּיַד נָתָן הַנָּבִיא וַיִּקְרָא אֶת־שְׁמוֹ יְדִידְיָהּ בַּעֲבוּר יְהוָה׃ 12.25. And he sent by the hand of Natan the prophet; and he called his name Yedidya, for the Lord’s sake."
10. Herodotus, Histories, 3.32, 3.34, 7.11, 7.210 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.32. There are two tales of her death, as there are of the death of Smerdis. The Greeks say that Cambyses had set a lion cub to fight a puppy, and that this woman was watching too; and that as the puppy was losing, its brother broke its leash and came to help, and the two dogs together got the better of the cub. ,Cambyses, they say, was pleased with the sight, but the woman wept as she sat by. Cambyses perceiving it asked why she wept, and she said that when she saw the puppy help its brother she had wept, recalling Smerdis and knowing that there would be no avenger for him. ,For saying this, according to the Greek story, she was killed by Cambyses. But the Egyptian tale is that as the two sat at table the woman took a lettuce and plucked off the leaves, then asked her husband whether he preferred the look of it with or without leaves. “With the leaves,” he said; whereupon she answered: ,“Yet you have stripped Cyrus' house as bare as this lettuce.” Angered at this, they say, he sprang upon her, who was great with child, and she miscarried and died of the hurt he gave her. 3.34. I will now relate his mad dealings with the rest of Persia . He said, as they report, to Prexaspes—whom he held in particular honor, who brought him all his messages, whose son held the very honorable office of Cambyses' cup-bearer—thus, I say, he spoke to Prexaspes: ,“What manner of man, Prexaspes, do the Persians think me to be, and how do they speak of me?” “Sire,” said Prexaspes, “for all else they greatly praise you, but they say that you love wine too well.” ,So he reported of the Persians. The king angrily replied: “If the Persians now say that it is my fondness for wine that drives me to frenzy and madness, then it would seem that their former saying also was a lie.” ,For it is said that before this, while some Persians and Croesus were sitting with him, Cambyses asked what manner of man they thought him to be in comparison with Cyrus his father; and they answered, “Cambyses was the better man; for he had all of Cyrus' possessions and had won Egypt and the sea besides.” ,So said the Persians; but Croesus, who was present, and was dissatisfied with their judgment, spoke thus to Cambyses: “To me, son of Cyrus, you do not seem to be the equal of your father; for you have as yet no son such as he left after him in you.” This pleased Cambyses, and he praised Croesus' judgment. 7.11. Thus spoke Artabanus. Xerxes answered angrily, “Artabanus, you are my father's brother; that will save you from receiving the fitting reward of foolish words. But for your cowardly lack of spirit I lay upon you this disgrace, that you will not go with me and my army against Hellas, but will stay here with the women; I myself will accomplish all that I have said, with no help from you. ,May I not be the son of Darius son of Hystaspes son of Arsames son of Ariaramnes son of Teispes son of Cyrus son of Cambyses son of Teispes son of Achaemenes, if I do not have vengeance on the Athenians; I well know that if we remain at peace they will not; they will assuredly invade our country, if we may infer from what they have done already, for they burnt Sardis and marched into Asia. ,It is not possible for either of us to turn back: to do or to suffer is our task, so that what is ours be under the Greeks, or what is theirs under the Persians; there is no middle way in our quarrel. ,Honor then demands that we avenge ourselves for what has been done to us; thus will I learn what is this evil that will befall me when I march against these Greeks—men that even Pelops the Phrygian, the slave of my forefathers, did so utterly subdue that to this day they and their country are called by the name of their conqueror.” 7.210. He let four days go by, expecting them to run away at any minute. They did not leave, and it seemed to him that they stayed out of folly and lack of due respect. On the fifth day he became angry and sent the Medes and Cissians against them, bidding them take them prisoner and bring them into his presence. ,The Medes bore down upon the Hellenes and attacked. Many fell, but others attacked in turn, and they made it clear to everyone, especially to the king himself, that among so many people there were few real men. The battle lasted all day.
11. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 411, 699, 855, 1274 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 3.13, 3.19 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.13. בֵּאדַיִן נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּר בִּרְגַז וַחֲמָה אֲמַר לְהַיְתָיָה לְשַׁדְרַךְ מֵישַׁךְ וַעֲבֵד נְגוֹ בֵּאדַיִן גֻּבְרַיָּא אִלֵּךְ הֵיתָיוּ קֳדָם מַלְכָּא׃ 3.19. בֵּאדַיִן נְבוּכַדְנֶצַּר הִתְמְלִי חֱמָא וּצְלֵם אַנְפּוֹהִי אשתנו [אֶשְׁתַּנִּי] עַל־שַׁדְרַךְ מֵישַׁךְ וַעֲבֵד נְגוֹ עָנֵה וְאָמַר לְמֵזֵא לְאַתּוּנָא חַד־שִׁבְעָה עַל דִּי חֲזֵה לְמֵזְיֵהּ׃ 3.13. Then Nebuchadnezzar in his rage and fury commanded to bring Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego. Then were these men brought before the king." 3.19. Then was Nebuchadnezzar filled with fury, and the form of his visage was changed, against Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego; he spoke, and commanded that they should heat the furnace seven times more than it was wont to be heated."
13. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 7.20-7.23, 7.39 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

7.20. The mother was especially admirable and worthy of honorable memory. Though she saw her seven sons perish within a single day, she bore it with good courage because of her hope in the Lord.' 7.21. She encouraged each of them in the language of their fathers. Filled with a noble spirit, she fired her woman's reasoning with a man's courage, and said to them,' 7.22. I do not know how you came into being in my womb. It was not I who gave you life and breath, nor I who set in order the elements within each of you.' 7.23. Therefore the Creator of the world, who shaped the beginning of man and devised the origin of all things, will in his mercy give life and breath back to you again, since you now forget yourselves for the sake of his laws.' 7.39. The king fell into a rage, and handled him worse than the others, being exasperated at his scorn.'
14. Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 1.24, 5.2, 5.13, 5.27, 6.9, 8.2, 8.5, 8.6, 8.7, 8.10, 9.6, 9.10, 14.11-16.25, 17.21, 18.20 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.24. Anger, as a man will see if he reflects on this experience, is an emotion embracing pleasure and pain.
15. Septuagint, 3 Maccabees, 3.1, 5.1, 5.30 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.1. When the impious king comprehended this situation, he became so infuriated that not only was he enraged against those Jews who lived in Alexandria, but was still more bitterly hostile toward those in the countryside; and he ordered that all should promptly be gathered into one place, and put to death by the most cruel means. 3.1. And already some of their neighbors and friends and business associates had taken some of them aside privately and were pledging to protect them and to exert more earnest efforts for their assistance. 5.1. Then the king, completely inflexible, was filled with overpowering anger and wrath; so he summoned Hermon, keeper of the elephants 5.1. Hermon, however, when he had drugged the pitiless elephants until they had been filled with a great abundance of wine and satiated with frankincense, presented himself at the courtyard early in the morning to report to the king about these preparations.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ahasuerus Gera, Judith (2014) 128
anger, power and Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
anger, royal Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
antiochus, emotions of Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
antiochus, power struggles of Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
antiochus iv epiphanes Gera, Judith (2014) 128
apocrypha Gera, Judith (2014) 128
aristotle, pain as an emotion Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
arrogance, among kings Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
arrogance, power and Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
assyrian royal inscriptions Gera, Judith (2014) 128
balak Gera, Judith (2014) 128
cambyses Gera, Judith (2014) 128
darius i Gera, Judith (2014) 128
david Gera, Judith (2014) 128
emotion, in the classical world Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
emotion, in the hebrew bible Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
emotional counter-discourse, as source of power Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
endurance Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 123
god, anger of Gera, Judith (2014) 128
hellenistic, writings Gera, Judith (2014) 128
herodotus Gera, Judith (2014) 128
kings, angry and cruel Gera, Judith (2014) 128
kraemer, ross, on christian critique of greco-roman culture Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 123
martyr/martyrdom Rosenblum, The Jewish Dietary Laws in the Ancient World (2016) 42
martyrdom, emotions and Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
nebuchadnezzar, biblical Gera, Judith (2014) 128
nebuchadnezzar of judith, angry Gera, Judith (2014) 128
nebuchadnezzar of judith, as rival of god Gera, Judith (2014) 128
nebuchadnezzar of judith Gera, Judith (2014) 128
oedipus rex Gera, Judith (2014) 128
pain, emotion and Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
pharaoh Gera, Judith (2014) 128
pork' Rosenblum, The Jewish Dietary Laws in the Ancient World (2016) 42
ptolemy iv philopator Gera, Judith (2014) 128
resistance, emotional Mermelstein, Power and Emotion in Ancient Judaism: Community and Identity in Formation (2021) 39
saul Gera, Judith (2014) 128
shame and disgrace Gera, Judith (2014) 128
sinai, single man Gera, Judith (2014) 128
women, christian, exemplifying masculine virtues Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 123
xerxes Gera, Judith (2014) 128