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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



5833
Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 7.18


nanBut as many as attend to religion with a whole heart, these alone are able to control the passions of the flesh


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1. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 6.20, 7.20-7.21 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6.20. as men ought to go who have the courage to refuse things that it is not right to taste, even for the natural love of life.' 7.20. The mother was especially admirable and worthy of honorable memory. Though she saw her seven sons perish within a single day, she bore it with good courage because of her hope in the Lord.' 7.21. She encouraged each of them in the language of their fathers. Filled with a noble spirit, she fired her woman's reasoning with a man's courage, and said to them,'
2. Septuagint, 4 Maccabees, 1.1-1.12, 5.8-5.11, 5.18-5.26, 7.19-7.23, 13.17, 13.19-13.22, 15.23, 15.29-15.30, 18.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.1. The subject that I am about to discuss is most philosophical, that is, whether devout reason is sovereign over the emotions. So it is right for me to advise you to pay earnest attention to philosophy. 1.2. For the subject is essential to everyone who is seeking knowledge, and in addition it includes the praise of the highest virtue -- I mean, of course, rational judgment. 1.3. If, then, it is evident that reason rules over those emotions that hinder self-control, namely, gluttony and lust 1.4. it is also clear that it masters the emotions that hinder one from justice, such as malice, and those that stand in the way of courage, namely anger, fear, and pain. 1.5. Some might perhaps ask, "If reason rules the emotions, why is it not sovereign over forgetfulness and ignorance?" Their attempt at argument is ridiculous! 1.6. For reason does not rule its own emotions, but those that are opposed to justice, courage, and self-control; and it is not for the purpose of destroying them, but so that one may not give way to them. 1.7. I could prove to you from many and various examples that reason is domit over the emotions 1.8. but I can demonstrate it best from the noble bravery of those who died for the sake of virtue, Eleazar and the seven brothers and their mother. 1.9. All of these, by despising sufferings that bring death, demonstrated that reason controls the emotions. 1.10. On this anniversary it is fitting for me to praise for their virtues those who, with their mother, died for the sake of nobility and goodness, but I would also call them blessed for the honor in which they are held. 1.11. For all people, even their torturers, marveled at their courage and endurance, and they became the cause of the downfall of tyranny over their nation. By their endurance they conquered the tyrant, and thus their native land was purified through them. 1.12. I shall shortly have an opportunity to speak of this; but, as my custom is, I shall begin by stating my main principle, and then I shall turn to their story, giving glory to the all-wise God. 5.8. Why, when nature has granted it to us, should you abhor eating the very excellent meat of this animal? 5.9. It is senseless not to enjoy delicious things that are not shameful, and wrong to spurn the gifts of nature. 5.10. It seems to me that you will do something even more senseless if, by holding a vain opinion concerning the truth, you continue to despise me to your own hurt. 5.11. Will you not awaken from your foolish philosophy, dispel your futile reasonings, adopt a mind appropriate to your years, philosophize according to the truth of what is beneficial 5.18. Even if, as you suppose, our law were not truly divine and we had wrongly held it to be divine, not even so would it be right for us to invalidate our reputation for piety. 5.19. Therefore do not suppose that it would be a petty sin if we were to eat defiling food; 5.20. to transgress the law in matters either small or great is of equal seriousness 5.21. for in either case the law is equally despised. 5.22. You scoff at our philosophy as though living by it were irrational 5.23. but it teaches us self-control, so that we master all pleasures and desires, and it also trains us in courage, so that we endure any suffering willingly; 5.24. it instructs us in justice, so that in all our dealings we act impartially, and it teaches us piety, so that with proper reverence we worship the only real God. 5.25. Therefore we do not eat defiling food; for since we believe that the law was established by God, we know that in the nature of things the Creator of the world in giving us the law has shown sympathy toward us. 5.26. He has permitted us to eat what will be most suitable for our lives, but he has forbidden us to eat meats that would be contrary to this. 7.19. ince they believe that they, like our patriarchs Abraham and Isaac and Jacob, do not die to God, but live in God. 7.20. No contradiction therefore arises when some persons appear to be dominated by their emotions because of the weakness of their reason. 7.21. What person who lives as a philosopher by the whole rule of philosophy, and trusts in God 7.22. and knows that it is blessed to endure any suffering for the sake of virtue, would not be able to overcome the emotions through godliness? 7.23. For only the wise and courageous man is lord of his emotions. 13.17. For if we so die, Abraham and Isaac and Jacob will welcome us, and all the fathers will praise us. 13.19. You are not ignorant of the affection of brotherhood, which the divine and all-wise Providence has bequeathed through the fathers to their descendants and which was implanted in the mother's womb. 13.20. There each of the brothers dwelt the same length of time and was shaped during the same period of time; and growing from the same blood and through the same life, they were brought to the light of day. 13.21. When they were born after an equal time of gestation, they drank milk from the same fountains. For such embraces brotherly-loving souls are nourished; 13.22. and they grow stronger from this common nurture and daily companionship, and from both general education and our discipline in the law of God. 15.23. But devout reason, giving her heart a man's courage in the very midst of her emotions, strengthened her to disregard her temporal love for her children. 15.29. O mother of the nation, vindicator of the law and champion of religion, who carried away the prize of the contest in your heart! 15.30. O more noble than males in steadfastness, and more manly than men in endurance! 18.23. But the sons of Abraham with their victorious mother are gathered together into the chorus of the fathers, and have received pure and immortal souls from God
3. Anon., Joseph And Aseneth, 28.11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
4 maccabees, on the rationality and truth of torah Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
4 maccabees Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
body, in jewish sources Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195
body Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195
endurance, in 2 maccabees and 4 maccabees Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 126
endurance, of mother of jewish martyrs Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 126
gender, in jewish views Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195
gender Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195
martens, john w. Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
mockery, in 4 maccabees Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
mother and seven sons, immortality as reward Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg, Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity (2023) 369
mothers, endurance of Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 126
novels, hellenistic, jewish Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195
philo, on the torah as the natural law Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
posthumous vindication, afterlife or immortality in heaven Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg, Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity (2023) 369
rationality of torah, in 4 maccabees Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
separation Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195
truth, and relationship to torah Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
wisdom, in 4 maccabees' Hayes, What's Divine about Divine Law?: Early Perspectives (2015) 111
women, in jewish sources Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195
women Lieu, Christian Identity in the Jewish and Graeco-Roman World (2004) 195