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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



661
Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 12.39-12.45


nanOn the next day, as by that time it had become necessary, Judas and his men went to take up the bodies of the fallen and to bring them back to lie with their kinsmen in the sepulchres of their fathers.'


nanThen under the tunic of every one of the dead they found sacred tokens of the idols of Jamnia, which the law forbids the Jews to wear. And it became clear to all that this was why these men had fallen.'


nanThen under the tunic of every one of the dead they found sacred tokens of the idols of Jamnia, which the law forbids the Jews to wear. And it became clear to all that this was why these men had fallen. 41 So they all blessed the ways of the Lord, the righteous Judge, who reveals the things that are hidden; 42 and they turned to prayer, beseeching that the sin which had been committed might be wholly blotted out. And the noble Judas exhorted the people to keep themselves free from sin, for they had seen with their own eyes what had happened because of the sin of those who had fallen. 43 He also took up a collection, man by man, to the amount of two thousand drachmas of silver, and sent it to Jerusalem to provide for a sin offering. In doing this he acted very well and honorably, taking account of the resurrection. 44 For if he were not expecting that those who had fallen would rise again, it would have been superfluous and foolish to pray for the dead. 45 But if he was looking to the splendid reward that is laid up for those who fall asleep in godliness, it was a holy and pious thought. Therefore he made atonement for the dead, that they might be delivered from their sin.


nanSo they all blessed the ways of the Lord, the righteous Judge, who reveals the things that are hidden;'


nanand they turned to prayer, beseeching that the sin which had been committed might be wholly blotted out. And the noble Judas exhorted the people to keep themselves free from sin, for they had seen with their own eyes what had happened because of the sin of those who had fallen.'


nanHe also took up a collection, man by man, to the amount of two thousand drachmas of silver, and sent it to Jerusalem to provide for a sin offering. In doing this he acted very well and honorably, taking account of the resurrection.'


nanFor if he were not expecting that those who had fallen would rise again, it would have been superfluous and foolish to pray for the dead.'


nanBut if he was looking to the splendid reward that is laid up for those who fall asleep in godliness, it was a holy and pious thought. Therefore he made atonement for the dead, that they might be delivered from their sin.'


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Daniel, 12.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

12.2. וְרַבִּים מִיְּשֵׁנֵי אַדְמַת־עָפָר יָקִיצוּ אֵלֶּה לְחַיֵּי עוֹלָם וְאֵלֶּה לַחֲרָפוֹת לְדִרְאוֹן עוֹלָם׃ 12.2. And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to reproaches and everlasting abhorrence."
2. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 5.25 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

5.25. They encountered the Nabateans, who met them peaceably and told them all that had happened to their brethren in Gilead:
3. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 4.2, 4.16-4.17, 4.35, 5.10, 6.31, 7.9-7.23, 8.1, 8.4-8.6, 9.5-9.6, 9.15, 9.28-9.29, 12.8, 12.10-12.38, 12.40-12.45, 13.7, 14.46 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

4.2. He dared to designate as a plotter against the government the man who was the benefactor of the city, the protector of his fellow countrymen, and a zealot for the laws.' 4.16. For this reason heavy disaster overtook them, and those whose ways of living they admired and wished to imitate completely became their enemies and punished them.' 4.17. For it is no light thing to show irreverence to the divine laws -- a fact which later events will make clear. 4.35. For this reason not only Jews, but many also of other nations, were grieved and displeased at the unjust murder of the man.' 5.10. He who had cast out many to lie unburied had no one to mourn for him; he had no funeral of any sort and no place in the tomb of his fathers. 6.31. So in this way he died, leaving in his death an example of nobility and a memorial of courage, not only to the young but to the great body of his nation.' 7.9. And when he was at his last breath, he said, 'You accursed wretch, you dismiss us from this present life, but the King of the universe will raise us up to an everlasting renewal of life, because we have died for his laws.' 7.10. After him, the third was the victim of their sport. When it was demanded, he quickly put out his tongue and courageously stretched forth his hands,' 7.11. and said nobly, 'I got these from Heaven, and because of his laws I disdain them, and from him I hope to get them back again.' 7.12. As a result the king himself and those with him were astonished at the young man's spirit, for he regarded his sufferings as nothing.' 7.13. When he too had died, they maltreated and tortured the fourth in the same way.' 7.14. And when he was near death, he said, 'One cannot but choose to die at the hands of men and to cherish the hope that God gives of being raised again by him. But for you there will be no resurrection to life!' 7.15. Next they brought forward the fifth and maltreated him. 7.16. But he looked at the king, and said, 'Because you have authority among men, mortal though you are, you do what you please. But do not think that God has forsaken our people.' 7.17. Keep on, and see how his mighty power will torture you and your descendants!' 7.18. After him they brought forward the sixth. And when he was about to die, he said, 'Do not deceive yourself in vain. For we are suffering these things on our own account, because of our sins against our own God. Therefore astounding things have happened.' 7.19. But do not think that you will go unpunished for having tried to fight against God!' 7.20. The mother was especially admirable and worthy of honorable memory. Though she saw her seven sons perish within a single day, she bore it with good courage because of her hope in the Lord.' 7.21. She encouraged each of them in the language of their fathers. Filled with a noble spirit, she fired her woman's reasoning with a man's courage, and said to them,' 7.22. I do not know how you came into being in my womb. It was not I who gave you life and breath, nor I who set in order the elements within each of you.' 7.23. Therefore the Creator of the world, who shaped the beginning of man and devised the origin of all things, will in his mercy give life and breath back to you again, since you now forget yourselves for the sake of his laws.' 8.1. But Judas, who was also called Maccabeus, and his companions secretly entered the villages and summoned their kinsmen and enlisted those who had continued in the Jewish faith, and so they gathered about six thousand men.' 8.4. and to remember also the lawless destruction of the innocent babies and the blasphemies committed against his name, and to show his hatred of evil.' 8.5. As soon as Maccabeus got his army organized, the Gentiles could not withstand him, for the wrath of the Lord had turned to mercy.' 8.6. Coming without warning, he would set fire to towns and villages. He captured strategic positions and put to flight not a few of the enemy.' 9.5. But the all-seeing Lord, the God of Israel, struck him an incurable and unseen blow. As soon as he ceased speaking he was seized with a pain in his bowels for which there was no relief and with sharp internal tortures --' 9.6. and that very justly, for he had tortured the bowels of others with many and strange inflictions.' 9.15. and the Jews, whom he had not considered worth burying but had planned to throw out with their children to the beasts, for the birds to pick, he would make, all of them, equal to citizens of Athens;' 9.28. So the murderer and blasphemer, having endured the more intense suffering, such as he had inflicted on others, came to the end of his life by a most pitiable fate, among the mountains in a strange land.' 9.29. And Philip, one of his courtiers, took his body home; then, fearing the son of Antiochus, he betook himself to Ptolemy Philometor in Egypt.' 12.8. But learning that the men in Jamnia meant in the same way to wipe out the Jews who were living among them,' 12.10. When they had gone more than a mile from there, on their march against Timothy, not less than five thousand Arabs with five hundred horsemen attacked them.' 12.11. After a hard fight Judas and his men won the victory, by the help of God. The defeated nomads besought Judas to grant them pledges of friendship, promising to give him cattle and to help his people in all other ways.' 12.12. Judas, thinking that they might really be useful in many ways, agreed to make peace with them; and after receiving his pledges they departed to their tents.' 12.13. He also attacked a certain city which was strongly fortified with earthworks and walls, and inhabited by all sorts of Gentiles. Its name was Caspin.' 12.14. And those who were within, relying on the strength of the walls and on their supply of provisions, behaved most insolently toward Judas and his men, railing at them and even blaspheming and saying unholy things.' 12.15. But Judas and his men, calling upon the great Sovereign of the world, who without battering-rams or engines of war overthrew Jericho in the days of Joshua, rushed furiously upon the walls.' 12.16. They took the city by the will of God, and slaughtered untold numbers, so that the adjoining lake, a quarter of a mile wide, appeared to be running over with blood.' 12.17. When they had gone ninety-five miles from there, they came to Charax, to the Jews who are called Toubiani.' 12.18. They did not find Timothy in that region, for he had by then departed from the region without accomplishing anything, though in one place he had left a very strong garrison.' 12.19. Dositheus and Sosipater, who were captains under Maccabeus, marched out and destroyed those whom Timothy had left in the stronghold, more than ten thousand men.' 12.20. But Maccabeus arranged his army in divisions, set men in command of the divisions, and hastened after Timothy, who had with him a hundred and twenty thousand infantry and two thousand five hundred cavalry.' 12.21. When Timothy learned of the approach of Judas, he sent off the women and the children and also the baggage to a place called Carnaim; for that place was hard to besiege and difficult of access because of the narrowness of all the approaches.' 12.22. But when Judas' first division appeared, terror and fear came over the enemy at the manifestation to them of him who sees all things; and they rushed off in flight and were swept on, this way and that, so that often they were injured by their own men and pierced by the points of their swords.' 12.23. And Judas pressed the pursuit with the utmost vigor, putting the sinners to the sword, and destroyed as many as thirty thousand men.' 12.24. Timothy himself fell into the hands of Dositheus and Sosipater and their men. With great guile he besought them to let him go in safety, because he held the parents of most of them and the brothers of some and no consideration would be shown them.' 12.25. And when with many words he had confirmed his solemn promise to restore them unharmed, they let him go, for the sake of saving their brethren.' 12.26. Then Judas marched against Carnaim and the temple of Atargatis, and slaughtered twenty-five thousand people.' 12.27. After the rout and destruction of these, he marched also against Ephron, a fortified city where Lysias dwelt with multitudes of people of all nationalities. Stalwart young men took their stand before the walls and made a vigorous defense; and great stores of war engines and missiles were there.' 12.28. But the Jews called upon the Sovereign who with power shatters the might of his enemies, and they got the city into their hands, and killed as many as twenty-five thousand of those who were within it.' 12.29. Setting out from there, they hastened to Scythopolis, which is seventy-five miles from Jerusalem.' 12.30. But when the Jews who dwelt there bore witness to the good will which the people of Scythopolis had shown them and their kind treatment of them in times of misfortune,' 12.31. they thanked them and exhorted them to be well disposed to their race in the future also. Then they went up to Jerusalem, as the feast of weeks was close at hand.' 12.32. After the feast called Pentecost, they hastened against Gorgias, the governor of Idumea.' 12.33. And he came out with three thousand infantry and four hundred cavalry. 12.34. When they joined battle, it happened that a few of the Jews fell.' 12.35. But a certain Dositheus, one of Bacenor's men, who was on horseback and was a strong man, caught hold of Gorgias, and grasping his cloak was dragging him off by main strength, wishing to take the accursed man alive, when one of the Thracian horsemen bore down upon him and cut off his arm; so Gorgias escaped and reached Marisa.' 12.36. As Esdris and his men had been fighting for a long time and were weary, Judas called upon the Lord to show himself their ally and leader in the battle.' 12.37. In the language of their fathers he raised the battle cry, with hymns; then he charged against Gorgias' men when they were not expecting it, and put them to flight.' 12.38. Then Judas assembled his army and went to the city of Adullam. As the seventh day was coming on, they purified themselves according to the custom, and they kept the sabbath there.' 12.40. Then under the tunic of every one of the dead they found sacred tokens of the idols of Jamnia, which the law forbids the Jews to wear. And it became clear to all that this was why these men had fallen.' 12.41. So they all blessed the ways of the Lord, the righteous Judge, who reveals the things that are hidden;' 12.42. and they turned to prayer, beseeching that the sin which had been committed might be wholly blotted out. And the noble Judas exhorted the people to keep themselves free from sin, for they had seen with their own eyes what had happened because of the sin of those who had fallen.' 12.43. He also took up a collection, man by man, to the amount of two thousand drachmas of silver, and sent it to Jerusalem to provide for a sin offering. In doing this he acted very well and honorably, taking account of the resurrection.' 12.44. For if he were not expecting that those who had fallen would rise again, it would have been superfluous and foolish to pray for the dead.' 12.45. But if he was looking to the splendid reward that is laid up for those who fall asleep in godliness, it was a holy and pious thought. Therefore he made atonement for the dead, that they might be delivered from their sin.' 13.7. By such a fate it came about that Menelaus the lawbreaker died, without even burial in the earth.' 14.46. with his blood now completely drained from him, he tore out his entrails, took them with both hands and hurled them at the crowd, calling upon the Lord of life and spirit to give them back to him again. This was the manner of his death.'
4. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 2.218 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.218. but every good man hath his own conscience bearing witness to himself, and by virtue of our legislator’s prophetic spirit, and of the firm security God himself affords such a one, he believes that God hath made this grant to those that observe these laws, even though they be obliged readily to die for them, that they shall come into being again, and at a certain revolution of things shall receive a better life than they had enjoyed before.
5. Mishnah, Keritot, 2.6 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.6. In the case of all forbidden relations, if one partner was an adult and the other a minor, the minor is exempt; If one is awake and the other asleep, the one asleep is exempt; If one is an inadvertent and the other intentional, the former is liable to a hatat, the latter to karet."
6. Mishnah, Yoma, 8.8 (1st cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.8. The sin-offering and the certain guilt-offering effect atonement. Death and Yom HaKippurim effect atonement together with repentance. Repentance effects atonement for light transgressions: [the transgression of] positive commandments and negative commandments. And for severer transgressions [repentance] suspends [the divine punishment], until Yom HaKippurim arrives and effects atonement."
7. Tosefta, Shabbat, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Anon., Qohelet Rabba, 7.15 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amoraim Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
ancestral language' Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 418
ancestral language Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
antiochenes Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
apocalypse, genre Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
artisans Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
atonement Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
atonement for Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
babylonia Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
biblical nature, see also deuteronomy, historiography, see under motifs Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
biblical nature, see also deuteronomy, structure Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
blood Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
bones Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
causality Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
cemetery, cemeteries Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
charity Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
christians Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302
city Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
coffins Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
commemoration Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
creation Beyerle and Goff, Notions of Time in Deuterocanonical and Cognate Literature (2022) 171
death Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
death and burial Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 245, 417, 418
distances Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 418
divine providence Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
en gedi" '205.0_65.0@antigone Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
family Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
general Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
gentiles Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
god, help of Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
goliath Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302
gymnasion (in jerusalem), antitemple Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
gymnasion (in jerusalem) Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
hellenistic Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
idolatry Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338; Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
ii maccabees, author of, his literary and intellectual skills Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
ii maccabees, author of, his pro-hasmonean bias Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
ii maccabees, author of, slanderous and defamatory Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
individual eschatology Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
inscribed bowl Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
inscriptions Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
jamnia Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
jason, disrupter Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
jericho Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
jerusalem, primacy vs. temple Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 245
jerusalem Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
jewish Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
jews (and judaism) Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
judgement, final Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
kallon Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302
kaspin Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 418
kings, books of Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
limestone Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
loculi Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
martyrdom Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88; Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 22; Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
messianic woes Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
mother and her seven sons Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
mother and seven sons, razis suicide Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg, Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity (2023) 360
mother and seven sons, resurrection Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg, Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity (2023) 360
motifs (thematic), gentiles protest persecution of jews Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 245
motifs (thematic), god rules history Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
motifs (thematic), jewish fatalities require explanation Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 418
motifs (thematic), martyrdom catalyzes reconciliation (and redemption) Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
motifs (thematic), villains as acting alone Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
nobility Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
opponents Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
orality, pagan Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
ossilegium Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
ossuary, ossuaries Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
periodisation of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
persecuted faithful judeans Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
persecutions Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
piety Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
post-mortem reward or punishment Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
posthumous vindication, resurrection Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg, Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity (2023) 360
prayer, prayer for dead Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
prayer Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
razis, martyrdom of Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
razis suicide, post-humous vindication Avemarie, van Henten, and Furstenberg, Jewish Martyrdom in Antiquity (2023) 360
reconciliation (between deity and people) Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
repository Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302
restoration within history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
resurrection, as reward of righteousness Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 22
resurrection, extent of (generality) Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 22
resurrection, principle of continuity Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 22
resurrection, timing of Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 22
resurrection, views in second temple judaism Mcglothlin, Resurrection as Salvation: Development and Conflict in Pre-Nicene Paulinism (2018) 22
resurrection Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524; Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417, 418
rome Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302
sabbath Beyerle and Goff, Notions of Time in Deuterocanonical and Cognate Literature (2022) 171
sacred Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
sacrifice Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
sacrifices, disruption of, and gymnasion Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
sacrifices, sin-offerings Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
sacrifices, unlawful Honigman, Tales of High Priests and Taxes: The Books of the Maccabees and the Judean Rebellion Against Antiochos IV (2014) 205
sarcophagus, sarcophagi Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
scythians Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
second temple Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302, 524
secondary burial Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 524
socrates, see also under eleazar Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 65
soldiers Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
sources of 2 maccabees Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
tannaitic Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338
teleology\n, view of history Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
temple Hachlili, Jewish Funerary Customs, Practices And Rites In The Second Temple Period (2005) 302
timothy Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 417
transjordan Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 418
zion, glorious Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 88
zoroastrian Herman, Rubenstein, The Aggada of the Bavli and Its Cultural World (2018) 338