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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10255
Seneca The Younger, Troades, 1069-1087
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.146-3.155, 3.181-3.244 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.146. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. 3.147. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. 3.148. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. 3.149. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. And they that were about Priam and Panthous and Thymoetes and Lampus and Clytius and Hicetaon, scion of Ares, and Ucalegon and Antenor, men of prudence both, sat as elders of the people at the Scaean gates. 3.150. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.151. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.152. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.153. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.154. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.155. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships 3.181. /And he was husband's brother to shameless me, as sure as ever such a one there was. So spake she, and the old man was seized with wonder, and said:Ah, happy son of Atreus, child of fortune, blest of heaven; now see I that youths of the Achaeans full many are made subject unto thee. Ere now have I journeyed to the land of Phrygia, rich in vines 3.182. /And he was husband's brother to shameless me, as sure as ever such a one there was. So spake she, and the old man was seized with wonder, and said:Ah, happy son of Atreus, child of fortune, blest of heaven; now see I that youths of the Achaeans full many are made subject unto thee. Ere now have I journeyed to the land of Phrygia, rich in vines 3.183. /And he was husband's brother to shameless me, as sure as ever such a one there was. So spake she, and the old man was seized with wonder, and said:Ah, happy son of Atreus, child of fortune, blest of heaven; now see I that youths of the Achaeans full many are made subject unto thee. Ere now have I journeyed to the land of Phrygia, rich in vines 3.184. /And he was husband's brother to shameless me, as sure as ever such a one there was. So spake she, and the old man was seized with wonder, and said:Ah, happy son of Atreus, child of fortune, blest of heaven; now see I that youths of the Achaeans full many are made subject unto thee. Ere now have I journeyed to the land of Phrygia, rich in vines 3.185. /and there I saw in multitudes the Phrygian warriors, masters of glancing steeds, even the people of Otreus and godlike Mygdon, that were then encamped along the banks of Sangarius. For I, too, being their ally, was numbered among them on the day when the Amazons came, the peers of men. 3.186. /and there I saw in multitudes the Phrygian warriors, masters of glancing steeds, even the people of Otreus and godlike Mygdon, that were then encamped along the banks of Sangarius. For I, too, being their ally, was numbered among them on the day when the Amazons came, the peers of men. 3.187. /and there I saw in multitudes the Phrygian warriors, masters of glancing steeds, even the people of Otreus and godlike Mygdon, that were then encamped along the banks of Sangarius. For I, too, being their ally, was numbered among them on the day when the Amazons came, the peers of men. 3.188. /and there I saw in multitudes the Phrygian warriors, masters of glancing steeds, even the people of Otreus and godlike Mygdon, that were then encamped along the banks of Sangarius. For I, too, being their ally, was numbered among them on the day when the Amazons came, the peers of men. 3.189. /and there I saw in multitudes the Phrygian warriors, masters of glancing steeds, even the people of Otreus and godlike Mygdon, that were then encamped along the banks of Sangarius. For I, too, being their ally, was numbered among them on the day when the Amazons came, the peers of men. 3.190. /Howbeit not even they were as many as are the bright-eyed Achaeans. 3.191. /Howbeit not even they were as many as are the bright-eyed Achaeans. 3.192. /Howbeit not even they were as many as are the bright-eyed Achaeans. 3.193. /Howbeit not even they were as many as are the bright-eyed Achaeans. 3.194. /Howbeit not even they were as many as are the bright-eyed Achaeans. And next the old man saw Odysseus, and asked:Come now, tell me also of yonder man, dear child, who he is. Shorter is he by a head than Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but broader of shoulder and of chest to look upon. 3.195. /His battle-gear lieth upon the bounteous earth, but himself he rangeth like the bell-wether of a herd through the ranks of warriors. Like a ram he seemeth to me, a ram of thick fleece, that paceth through a great flock of white ewes. To him made answer Helen, sprung from Zeus: 3.196. /His battle-gear lieth upon the bounteous earth, but himself he rangeth like the bell-wether of a herd through the ranks of warriors. Like a ram he seemeth to me, a ram of thick fleece, that paceth through a great flock of white ewes. To him made answer Helen, sprung from Zeus: 3.197. /His battle-gear lieth upon the bounteous earth, but himself he rangeth like the bell-wether of a herd through the ranks of warriors. Like a ram he seemeth to me, a ram of thick fleece, that paceth through a great flock of white ewes. To him made answer Helen, sprung from Zeus: 3.198. /His battle-gear lieth upon the bounteous earth, but himself he rangeth like the bell-wether of a herd through the ranks of warriors. Like a ram he seemeth to me, a ram of thick fleece, that paceth through a great flock of white ewes. To him made answer Helen, sprung from Zeus: 3.199. /His battle-gear lieth upon the bounteous earth, but himself he rangeth like the bell-wether of a herd through the ranks of warriors. Like a ram he seemeth to me, a ram of thick fleece, that paceth through a great flock of white ewes. To him made answer Helen, sprung from Zeus: 3.200. / This again is Laertes' son, Odysseus of many wiles, that was reared in the land of Ithaca, rugged though it be, and he knoweth all manner of craft and cunning devices. Then to her again made answer Antenor, the wise:Lady, this verily is a true word that thou hast spoken 3.201. / This again is Laertes' son, Odysseus of many wiles, that was reared in the land of Ithaca, rugged though it be, and he knoweth all manner of craft and cunning devices. Then to her again made answer Antenor, the wise:Lady, this verily is a true word that thou hast spoken 3.202. / This again is Laertes' son, Odysseus of many wiles, that was reared in the land of Ithaca, rugged though it be, and he knoweth all manner of craft and cunning devices. Then to her again made answer Antenor, the wise:Lady, this verily is a true word that thou hast spoken 3.203. / This again is Laertes' son, Odysseus of many wiles, that was reared in the land of Ithaca, rugged though it be, and he knoweth all manner of craft and cunning devices. Then to her again made answer Antenor, the wise:Lady, this verily is a true word that thou hast spoken 3.204. / This again is Laertes' son, Odysseus of many wiles, that was reared in the land of Ithaca, rugged though it be, and he knoweth all manner of craft and cunning devices. Then to her again made answer Antenor, the wise:Lady, this verily is a true word that thou hast spoken 3.205. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.206. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.207. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.208. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.209. /for erstwhile on a time goodly Odysseus came hither also on an embassy concerning thee, together with Menelaus, dear to Ares; and it was I that gave them entertainment and welcomed them in my halls, and came to know the form and stature of them both and their cunning devices. Now when they mingled with the Trojans, as they were gathered together 3.210. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.211. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.212. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.213. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.214. /when they stood Menelaus overtopped him with his broad shoulders; howbeit when the twain were seated Odysseus was the more royal. But when they began to weave the web of speech and of counsel in the presence of all, Menelaus in truth spake fluently, with few words, but very clearly, seeing he was not a man of lengthy speech 3.215. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.216. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.217. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.218. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.219. /nor of rambling, though verily in years he was the younger. But whenever Odysseus of many wiles arose, he would stand and look down with eyes fixed upon the ground, and his staff he would move neither backwards nor forwards, but would hold it stiff, in semblance like a man of no understanding; 3.220. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.221. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.222. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.223. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.224. /thou wouldest have deemed him a churlish man and naught but a fool. But whenso he uttered his great voice from his chest, and words like snowflakes on a winter's day, then could no mortal man beside vie with Odysseus; then did we not so marvel to behold Odysseus' aspect. 3.225. /And, thirdly, the old man saw Aias, and asked:Who then is this other Achaean warrior, valiant and tall, towering above the Argives with his head and broad shoulders? And to him made answer long-robed Helen, fair among women:This is huge Aias, bulwark of the Achaeans. 3.226. /And, thirdly, the old man saw Aias, and asked:Who then is this other Achaean warrior, valiant and tall, towering above the Argives with his head and broad shoulders? And to him made answer long-robed Helen, fair among women:This is huge Aias, bulwark of the Achaeans. 3.227. /And, thirdly, the old man saw Aias, and asked:Who then is this other Achaean warrior, valiant and tall, towering above the Argives with his head and broad shoulders? And to him made answer long-robed Helen, fair among women:This is huge Aias, bulwark of the Achaeans. 3.228. /And, thirdly, the old man saw Aias, and asked:Who then is this other Achaean warrior, valiant and tall, towering above the Argives with his head and broad shoulders? And to him made answer long-robed Helen, fair among women:This is huge Aias, bulwark of the Achaeans. 3.229. /And, thirdly, the old man saw Aias, and asked:Who then is this other Achaean warrior, valiant and tall, towering above the Argives with his head and broad shoulders? And to him made answer long-robed Helen, fair among women:This is huge Aias, bulwark of the Achaeans. 3.230. /And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. Full often was Menelaus, dear to Ares, wont to entertain him in our house, whenever he came from Crete. And now all the rest of the bright-eyed Achaeans do I see 3.231. /And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. Full often was Menelaus, dear to Ares, wont to entertain him in our house, whenever he came from Crete. And now all the rest of the bright-eyed Achaeans do I see 3.232. /And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. Full often was Menelaus, dear to Ares, wont to entertain him in our house, whenever he came from Crete. And now all the rest of the bright-eyed Achaeans do I see 3.233. /And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. Full often was Menelaus, dear to Ares, wont to entertain him in our house, whenever he came from Crete. And now all the rest of the bright-eyed Achaeans do I see 3.234. /And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. Full often was Menelaus, dear to Ares, wont to entertain him in our house, whenever he came from Crete. And now all the rest of the bright-eyed Achaeans do I see 3.235. /whom I could well note, and tell their names; but two marshallers of the host can I not see, Castor, tamer of horses, and the goodly boxer, Polydeuces, even mine own brethren, whom the same mother bare. Either they followed not with the host from lovely Lacedaemon 3.236. /whom I could well note, and tell their names; but two marshallers of the host can I not see, Castor, tamer of horses, and the goodly boxer, Polydeuces, even mine own brethren, whom the same mother bare. Either they followed not with the host from lovely Lacedaemon 3.237. /whom I could well note, and tell their names; but two marshallers of the host can I not see, Castor, tamer of horses, and the goodly boxer, Polydeuces, even mine own brethren, whom the same mother bare. Either they followed not with the host from lovely Lacedaemon 3.238. /whom I could well note, and tell their names; but two marshallers of the host can I not see, Castor, tamer of horses, and the goodly boxer, Polydeuces, even mine own brethren, whom the same mother bare. Either they followed not with the host from lovely Lacedaemon 3.239. /whom I could well note, and tell their names; but two marshallers of the host can I not see, Castor, tamer of horses, and the goodly boxer, Polydeuces, even mine own brethren, whom the same mother bare. Either they followed not with the host from lovely Lacedaemon 3.240. /or though they followed hither in their seafaring ships, they have now no heart to enter into the battle of warriors for fear of the words of shame and the many revilings that are mine. So said she; but they ere now were fast holden of the life-giving earth there in Lacedaemon, in their dear native land. 3.241. /or though they followed hither in their seafaring ships, they have now no heart to enter into the battle of warriors for fear of the words of shame and the many revilings that are mine. So said she; but they ere now were fast holden of the life-giving earth there in Lacedaemon, in their dear native land. 3.242. /or though they followed hither in their seafaring ships, they have now no heart to enter into the battle of warriors for fear of the words of shame and the many revilings that are mine. So said she; but they ere now were fast holden of the life-giving earth there in Lacedaemon, in their dear native land. 3.243. /or though they followed hither in their seafaring ships, they have now no heart to enter into the battle of warriors for fear of the words of shame and the many revilings that are mine. So said she; but they ere now were fast holden of the life-giving earth there in Lacedaemon, in their dear native land. 3.244. /or though they followed hither in their seafaring ships, they have now no heart to enter into the battle of warriors for fear of the words of shame and the many revilings that are mine. So said she; but they ere now were fast holden of the life-giving earth there in Lacedaemon, in their dear native land.
2. Propertius, Elegies, 2.14.23-2.14.24 (1st cent. BCE

3. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.553, 9.599-9.600 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Seneca The Younger, Troades, 1070-1087, 1097-1103, 1123-1126, 1128-1129, 1068 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Suetonius, Iulius, 37.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
andromache Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
argo Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
astyanax Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39, 135; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
audience Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
capitol, processions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
cato the younger Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
chorus, choral Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
cosmic dissolution Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
death Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
epic Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
fate Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
fear Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39, 135
hecuba Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
helen Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
hippolytus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39, 135
horror Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
identity Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
intertexts Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
julius caesar, triumphs of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
messenger Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39, 135
mime Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
myth Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
performance Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
phaedra Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
polyxena Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
pompey (the great), triumphs and honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
priam Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
scaean gates Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
spectacle Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
spectacle in public life Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
theatres Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39
theseus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
triumphs Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
triumphs spurned' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
trojan war Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
trojans Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 135
troy Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 39, 135; Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
velabrum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
vespasian, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6