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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10238
Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 17.8-17.9
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Euripides, Bacchae, 117-119, 1236, 217-220, 243, 280-281, 381, 772, 116 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

116. εἰς ὄρος εἰς ὄρος, ἔνθα μένει
2. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

244a. that the former discourse was by Phaedrus, the son of Pythocles (Eager for Fame) of Myrrhinus (Myrrhtown); but this which I shall speak is by Stesichorus, son of Euphemus (Man of pious Speech) of Himera (Town of Desire). And I must say that this saying is not true, which teaches that when a lover is at hand the non-lover should be more favored, because the lover is insane, and the other sane. For if it were a simple fact that insanity is an evil, the saying would be true; but in reality the greatest of blessings come to us through madness, when it is sent as a gift of the gods. For the prophetess at Delphi
3. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.766, 8.717-8.718, 8.722 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.766. lighted full well my roving steps and eyes. 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain
4. Cornutus, De Natura Deorum, 30 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Seneca The Younger, On Leisure, 17.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 83.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Tacitus, Annals, 14.53 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.53.  Seneca was aware of his maligners: they were revealed from the quarters where there was some little regard for honour, and the Caesar's avoidance of his intimacy was becoming marked. He therefore asked to have a time fixed for an interview; it was granted, and he began as follows:— "It is the fourteenth year, Caesar, since I was associated with your hopeful youth, the eighth that you have held the empire: in the time between, you have heaped upon me so much of honour and of wealth that all that is lacking to complete my happiness is discretion in its use. I shall appeal to great precedents, and I shall draw them not from my rank but from yours. Augustus, the grandfather of your grandfather, conceded to Marcus Agrippa the privacy of Mytilene, and to Gaius Maecenas, within the capital itself, something tantamount to retirement abroad. One had been the partner of his wars, the other had been harassed by more numerous labours at Rome, and each had received his reward — a magnificent reward, it is true, but proportioned to immense deserts. For myself, what incentive to your generosity have I been able to apply except some bookish acquirements, cultivated, I might say, in the shadows of the cloister? Acquirements to which fame has come because I am thought to have lent a helping hand in your own first youthful efforts — a wage that overpays the service! But you have invested me with measureless influence, with countless riches; so that often I put the question to myself:— 'Is it I, born in the station of a simple knight and a provincial, who am numbered with the magnates of the realm? Among these nobles, wearing their long-descended glories, has my novel name swum into ken? Where is that spirit which found contentment in mediocrity? Building these terraced gardens? — Pacing these suburban mansions? — Luxuriating in these broad acres, these world-wide investments?' — A single defence suggests itself — that I had not the right to obstruct your bounty.
8. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.7.5-2.7.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.7.5. On the modern citadel is a sanctuary of Fortune of the Height, and after it one of the Dioscuri. Their images and that of Fortune are of wood. On the stage of the theater built under the citadel is a statue of a man with a shield, who they say is Aratus, the son of Cleinias. After the theater is a temple of Dionysus. The god is of gold and ivory, and by his side are Bacchanals of white marble. These women they say are sacred to Dionysus and maddened by his inspiration. The Sicyonians have also some images which are kept secret. These one night in each year they carry to the temple of Dionysus from what they call the Cosmeterium (Tiring-room), and they do so with lighted torches and native hymns. 2.7.6. The first is the one named Baccheus, set up by Androdamas, the son of Phlias, and this is followed by the one called Lysius (Deliverer), brought from Thebes by the Theban Phanes at the command of the Pythian priestess. Phanes came to Sicyon when Aristomachus, the son of Cleodaeus, failed to understand the oracle I To wait for “the third fruit,” i.e. the third generation. It was interpreted to mean the third year. given him, and therefore failed to return to the Peloponnesus . As you walk from the temple of Dionysus to the market-place you see on the right a temple of Artemis of the lake. A look shows that the roof has fallen in, but the inhabitants cannot tell whether the image has been removed or how it was destroyed on the spot.
9. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.118, 10.119 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.118. Again, the good are genuinely in earnest and vigilant for their own improvement, using a manner of life which banishes evil out of sight and makes what good there is in things appear. At the same time they are free from pretence; for they have stripped off all pretence or make-up whether in voice or in look. Free too are they from all business cares, declining to do anything which conflicts with duty. They will take wine, but not get drunk. Nay more, they will not be liable to madness either; not but what there will at times occur to the good man strange impressions due to melancholy or delirium, ideas not determined by the principle of what is choiceworthy but contrary to nature. Nor indeed will the wise man ever feel grief; seeing that grief is irrational contraction of the soul, as Apollodorus says in his Ethics. 10.119. Nor, again, will the wise man marry and rear a family: so Epicurus says in the Problems and in the De Natura. Occasionally he may marry owing to special circumstances in his life. Some too will turn aside from their purpose. Nor will he drivel, when drunken: so Epicurus says in the Symposium. Nor will he take part in politics, as is stated in the first book On Life; nor will he make himself a tyrant; nor will he turn Cynic (so the second book On Life tells us); nor will he be a mendicant. But even when he has lost his sight, he will not withdraw himself from life: this is stated in the same book. The wise man will also feel grief, according to Diogenes in the fifth book of his Epilecta.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas, founder of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
afterlife Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
arius didymus Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
baccheia βακχεία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
bad (evil) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
cato (roman statesman) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
character (diathesis, hexis, disposition, stable state) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
chrysippus Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
cicero Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
cognitive / cognition Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
dancing Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 190
delirium Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos baccheios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos liberator Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos lyaios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos lyseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, dionysos lysios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
disease (nosos, nosēma) / illness Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
doxography / doxographer Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
fear (phobos) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
freedom (eleutheria) / free (eleutheros) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
games, as recreation Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
gardens Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
gift Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
habit / habituate / habitude (ethos, ethizesthai, hexis) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
health (hugieia) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
intoxication Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 192
liberation Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
love of various things (philomatheia, philomousia, ktl.) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
lucilius iunior Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 190
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
maenads, maenadic, maenadism, rites/cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
maximalists Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 192
moderation (metriopatheia) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
mountains Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
movement in the city, walking and running Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
movement in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
nausea Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 190
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
non-cognitive Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
oreibasia ὀρειβασία Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
orgia ὄργια Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
palimpsestic rome, in augustan poets Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
pleasure Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 190
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
purification Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
rite, ritual, maenadic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
sagehood Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 192
seneca Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342; Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 192
serenus, annaeus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 190
sickness (arrōstēma) / infirmity Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
sicyon, sicyonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
soul / mind (psuchē, animus) vii, intellect (nous) / thoughts (dianoiai) Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
soul / mind (psuchē, animus) vii Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
stoic Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 192
stoics Nijs, The Epicurean Sage in the Ethics of Philodemus (2023) 192
stomach Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 190
strength (ischus) / strengthen Lee, Moral Transformation in Greco-Roman Philosophy of Mind: Mapping the Moral Milieu of the Apostle Paul and His Diaspora Jewish Contemporaries (2020) 342
suburbanum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
teiresias Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
troy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
vulcan Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
walking in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
walls of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152
weakening Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 190
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 50
women, in roman religions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 152