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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10250
Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 92
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.34. Iis igitur adsentior, qui duo genera divinationum esse dixerunt, unum, quod particeps esset artis, alterum, quod arte careret. Est enim ars in iis, qui novas res coniectura persequuntur, veteres observatione didicerunt. Carent autem arte ii, qui non ratione aut coniectura observatis ac notatis signis, sed concitatione quadam animi aut soluto liberoque motu futura praesentiunt, quod et somniantibus saepe contingit et non numquam vaticitibus per furorem, ut Bacis Boeotius, ut Epimenides Cres, ut Sibylla Erythraea. Cuius generis oracla etiam habenda sunt, non ea, quae aequatis sortibus ducuntur, sed illa, quae instinctu divino adflatuque funduntur; etsi ipsa sors contemnenda non est, si et auctoritatem habet vetustatis, ut eae sunt sortes, quas e terra editas accepimus; quae tamen ductae ut in rem apte cadant, fieri credo posse divinitus. Quorum omnium interpretes, ut grammatici poe+tarum, proxime ad eorum, quos interpretantur, divinationem videntur accedere. 1.34. I agree, therefore, with those who have said that there are two kinds of divination: one, which is allied with art; the other, which is devoid of art. Those diviners employ art, who, having learned the known by observation, seek the unknown by deduction. On the other hand those do without art who, unaided by reason or deduction or by signs which have been observed and recorded, forecast the future while under the influence of mental excitement, or of some free and unrestrained emotion. This condition often occurs to men while dreaming and sometimes to persons who prophesy while in a frenzy — like Bacis of Boeotia, Epimenides of Crete and the Sibyl of Erythraea. In this latter class must be placed oracles — not oracles given by means of equalized lots — but those uttered under the impulse of divine inspiration; although divination by lot is not in itself to be despised, if it has the sanction of antiquity, as in the case of those lots which, according to tradition, sprang out of the earth; for in spite of everything, I am inclined to think that they may, under the power of God, be so drawn as to give an appropriate response. Men capable of correctly interpreting all these signs of the future seem to approach very near to the divine spirit of the gods whose wills they interpret, just as scholars do when they interpret the poets.
2. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 101, 82-86, 100 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
body, physiognomy, of oedipus Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
body, physiognomy, similarity to a text Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
character, fictional, as textual construct Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
cicero, on poetry and divination Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
corinth Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
cue Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
entrances Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
extispicy, in oedipus Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
fear Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
fortuna Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
identity, and metapoetics Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
jocasta Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
monologue Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
oedipus, resemblance to a text Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
oedipus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
philosophy Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
politics Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
power Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
prologue Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
senex' Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271
sphinx, in oedipus Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 255
stoic Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 271