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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10250
Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 418
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Sophocles, Antigone, 116-154, 115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 101, 1012-1013, 1016-1019, 102, 1020, 103, 1032, 1036, 104-106, 1068, 107, 1071-1072, 110-111, 1129-1131, 1133-1139, 114-115, 1169-1170, 1177-1181, 1184-1185, 1223-1296, 139-146, 288-289, 298-304, 307, 312-313, 316-317, 320-321, 324-402, 532-630, 85, 87-88, 91-92, 95, 953, 96, 964-969, 97, 970-972, 976, 98-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 538, 552-553, 555-581, 584-587, 623, 629-630, 537 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

537. and partly to grieve over my sufferings in your company. I have received a maiden—or, I believe, no longer a maiden, but an experienced woman—into my home, just as a mariner takes on cargo, a merchandise to wreck my peace of mind. And now we are two, a pair waiting under
4. Strabo, Geography, 8.3.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.3.19. At the base of these mountains, on the seaboard, are two caves. One is the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades; the other is the scene of the stories of the daughters of Atlas and of the birth of Dardanus. And here, too, are the sacred precincts called the Ionaion and the Eurycydeium. Samicum is now only a fortress, though formerly there was also a city which was called Samos, perhaps because of its lofty situation; for they used to call lofty places Samoi. And perhaps Samicum was the acropolis of Arene, which the poet mentions in the Catalogue: And those who dwelt in Pylus and lovely Arene. For while they cannot with certainty discover Arene anywhere, they prefer to conjecture that this is its site; and the neighboring River Anigrus, formerly called Minyeius, gives no slight indication of the truth of the conjecture, for the poet says: And there is a River Minyeius which falls into the sea near Arene. For near the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades is a spring which makes the region that lies below it swampy and marshy. The greater part of the water is received by the Anigrus, a river so deep and so sluggish that it forms a marsh; and since the region is muddy, it emits an offensive odor for a distance of twenty stadia, and makes the fish unfit to eat. In the mythical accounts, however, this is attributed by some writers to the fact that certain of the Centaurs here washed off the poison they got from the Hydra, and by others to the fact that Melampus used these cleansing waters for the purification of the Proetides. The bathing-water from here cures leprosy, elephantiasis, and scabies. It is said, also, that the Alpheius was so named from its being a cure for leprosy. At any rate, since both the sluggishness of the Anigrus and the backwash from the sea give fixity rather than current to its waters, it was called the Minyeius in earlier times, so it is said, though some have perverted the name and made it Minteius instead. But the word has other sources of derivation, either from the people who went forth with Chloris, the mother of Nestor, from the Minyeian Orchomenus, or from the Minyans, who, being descendants of the Argonauts, were first driven out of Lemnos into Lacedemon, and thence into Triphylia, and took up their abode about Arene in the country which is now called Hypaesia, though it no longer has the settlements of the Minyans. Some of these Minyans sailed with Theras, the son of Autesion, who was a descendant of Polyneices, to the island which is situated between Cyrenaea and Crete (Calliste its earlier name, but Thera its later, as Callimachus says), and founded Thera, the mother-city of Cyrene, and designated the island by the same name as the city.
5. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.4.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.4.3. Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας.
6. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Oetaeus, 486-538, 567-582, 485 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 216, 233-238, 286, 509, 697-708, 838-881, 915-979, 212 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.25.9, 5.5.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.25.9. Going down seawards, you come to the chambers of the daughters of Proetus. On returning to the highway you will reach Medea on the left hand. They say that Electryon, the father of Alcmena, was king of Medea, but in my time nothing was left of it except the foundations. 5.5.10. others that Pylenor, another Centaur, when shot by Heracles fled wounded to this river and washed his hurt in it, and that it was the hydra's poison which gave the Anigrus its nasty smell. Others again attribute the quality of the river to Melampus the son of Amythaon, who threw into it the means he used to purify the daughters of Proetus.
9. Bacchylides, Odes, 11.48-11.49, 11.95-11.96, 11.106-11.109

10. Epigraphy, Seg, 15.195



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
antigone (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
argos, argive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
choreia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
dionysos, dionysos erikryptos/kryptos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
hera Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
hercules on oeta (seneca) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
information, from the outside, by seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
initiation, initiatory rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
iphinoe, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
iphinoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
lion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 539
macedonia, macedonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
melampus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
music, musical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
mysteries, mystery cults, bacchic, dionysiac Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
nekysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
oedipus the king (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
panther Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 539
philter, from deianira Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
proetids, daughters of proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 539
sicyon, sicyonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
skin Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
tiryns Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
women of trachis, the (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763