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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10248
Seneca The Younger, Medea, 665-667
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Euripides, Medea, 9-10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. to slay their father and come to live here in the land of Corinth with her husband and children, where her exile found favour with the citizens to whose land she had come, and in all things of her own accord was she at one with Jason, the greatest safeguard thi
2. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 111, 110 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

110. αὕτως δʼ ἔζωον· χαλεπὴ δʼ ἀπέκειτο θάλασσα
3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.89 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.89. Just as the shield in Accius who had never seen a ship before, on descrying in the distance from his mountain‑top the strange vessel of the Argonauts, built by the gods, in his first amazement and alarm cries out: so huge a bulk Glides from the deep with the roar of a whistling wind: Waves roll before, and eddies surge and swirl; Hurtling headlong, it snort and sprays the foam. Now might one deem a bursting storm-cloud rolled, Now that a rock flew skyward, flung aloft By wind and storm, or whirling waterspout Rose from the clash of wave with warring wave; Save 'twere land-havoc wrought by ocean-flood, Or Triton's trident, heaving up the roots of cavernous vaults beneath the billowy sea, Hurled from the depth heaven-high a massy crag. At first he wonders what the unknown creature that he beholds may be. Then when he sees the warriors and hears the singing of the sailors, he goes on: the sportive dolphins swift Forge snorting through the foam — and so on and so on — Brings to my ears and hearing such a tune As old Silvanus piped.
4. Cicero, On Duties, 2.23-2.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.23. Omnium autem rerum nec aptius est quicquam ad opes tuendas ac tenendas quam diligi nec alienius quam timeri. Praeclare enim Ennius: Quém metuunt, odérunt; quem quisque ódit, periisse éxpetit. Multorum autem odiis nullas opes posse obsistere, si antea fuit ignotum, nuper est cognitum. Nec vero huius tyranni solum, quem armis oppressa pertulit civitas ac paret cum maxime mortuo, interitus declarat, quantum odium hominum valeat ad pestem, sed reliquorum similes exitus tyrannorum, quorum haud fere quisquam talem interitum effugit; malus enim est custos diuturnitatis metus contraque benivolentia fidelis vel ad perpetuitatem. 2.24. Sed iis, qui vi oppresses imperio coercent, sit sane adhibenda saevitia, ut eris in famulos, si aliter teneri non possunt; qui vero in libera civitate ita se instruunt, ut metuantur, iis nihil potest esse dementius. Quamvis enim sint demersae leges alicuius opibus, quamvis timefacta libertas, emergunt tamen haec aliquando aut iudiciis tacitis aut occultis de honore suffragiis. Acriores autem morsus sunt intermissae libertatis quam retentae. Quod igitur latissime patet neque ad incolumitatem solum, sed etiam ad opes et potentiam valet plurimum, id amplectamur, ut metus absit, caritas retineatur. Ita facillime, quae volemus, et privatis in rebus et in re publica consequemur. Etenim qui se metui volent, a quibus metuentur, eosdem metuant ipsi necesse est. 2.23.  But, of all motives, none is better adapted to secure influence and hold it fast than love; nothing is more foreign to that end than fear. For Ennius says admirably: "Whom they fear they hate. And whom one hates, one hopes to see him dead." And we recently discovered, if it was not known before, that no amount of power can withstand the hatred of the many. The death of this tyrant, whose yoke the state endured under the constraint of armed force and whom it still obeys more humbly than ever, though he is dead, illustrates the deadly effects of popular hatred; and the same lesson is taught by the similar fate of all other despots, of whom practically no one has ever escaped such a death. For fear is but a poor safeguard of lasting power; while affection, on the other hand, may be trusted to keep it safe for ever. 2.24.  But those who keep subjects in check by force would of course have to employ severity — masters, for example, toward their servants, when these cannot be held in control in any other way. But those who in a free state deliberately put themselves in a position to be feared are the maddest of the mad. For let the laws be never so much overborne by some one individual's power, let the spirit of freedom be never so intimidated, still sooner or later they assert themselves either through unvoiced public sentiment, or through secret ballots disposing of some high office of state. Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered. Let us, then, embrace this policy, which appeals to every heart and is the strongest support not only of security but also of influence and power — namely, to banish fear and cleave to love. And thus we shall most easily secure success both in private and in public life. Furthermore, those who wish to be feared must inevitably be afraid of those whom they intimidate.
5. Catullus, Poems, 64.1-64.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Horace, Odes, 1.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3. I have proposed to myself, for the sake of such as live under the government of the Romans, to translate those books into the Greek tongue, which I formerly composed in the language of our country, and sent to the Upper Barbarians; I, Joseph, the son of Matthias, by birth a Hebrew, a priest also, and one who at first fought against the Romans myself, and was forced to be present at what was done afterward [am the author of this work]. 1.3. 12. I have comprehended all these things in seven books, and have left no occasion for complaint or accusation to such as have been acquainted with this war; and I have written it down for the sake of those that love truth, but not for those that please themselves [with fictitious relations]. And I will begin my account of these things with what I call my First Chapter. 1.3. When Antigonus heard of this, he sent some of his party with orders to hinder, and lay ambushes for these collectors of corn. This command was obeyed, and a great multitude of armed men were gathered together about Jericho, and lay upon the mountains, to watch those that brought the provisions.
7. Ovid, Amores, 2.11.1-2.11.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.721, 7.297-7.349 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Vergil, Aeneis, 10.843-10.859 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.843. ome larger grace, and fain would touch or change 10.844. the issue of the war, then art thou fed 10.845. on expectation vain.” With weeping eyes 10.846. Juno made answer: “Can it be thy mind 10.847. gives what thy words refuse, and Turnus' life 10.848. if rescued, may endure? Yet afterward 10.849. ome cruel close his guiltless day shall see— 10.850. or far from truth I stray! O, that I were 10.851. the dupe of empty fears! and O, that thou 10.852. wouldst but refashion to some happier end 10.854. She ceased; and swiftly from the peak of heaven 10.855. moved earthward, trailing cloud-wrack through the air 10.856. and girdled with the storm. She took her way 10.857. to where Troy 's warriors faced Laurentum's line. 10.858. There of a hollow cloud the goddess framed 10.859. a shape of airy, unsubstantial shade
10. Seneca The Younger, Medea, 302-379, 579-664, 666-669, 301 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.5, 1.39-1.40, 1.60-1.63, 1.211-1.226, 1.234-1.239, 1.349, 1.489-1.493, 1.542-1.567, 1.700-1.729, 1.770 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeetes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
aeson Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 120
argo, as first ship Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
cicero, fear Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
colchis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
danaus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115
doliones Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 120
egypt Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115
eratosthenes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115
euripides, medea Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
fear, and hatred Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
gesander Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 120
golden age Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 120
idmon Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
jason Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
juno, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
juno, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
juno, sen. herc. fur. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
jupiter (see also zeus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
lemnos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 120
medea, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
medea, eur. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
medea, ovids met. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
medea, sen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
mezentius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
mopsus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
pelias, and/as atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
pelias, as mezentius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
pelias, feminized Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
perses Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
primitivism Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
rage, characteristic of tyrant Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
rome Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
saturn (see also cronus) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
seneca, herc. fur. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
seneca, thy. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 57
seneca the younger Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
tragedy' Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 312
valerius flaccus, and apollonius rhodius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
valerius flaccus, and seneca Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 120
valerius flaccus, civil war in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115, 120
valerius flaccus, storm in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 115