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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10248
Seneca The Younger, Medea, 45
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, On Duties, 1.113-1.114 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.113. Quam multa passus est Ulixes in illo errore diuturno, cum et mulieribus, si Circe et Calypso mulieres appellandae sunt, inserviret et in omni sermone omnibus affabilem et iucundum esse se vellet! domi vero etiam contumelias servorun ancillarumque pertulit, ut ad id aliquando, quod cupiebat, veniret. At Aiax, quo animo traditur, milies oppetere mortem quam illa perpeti maluisset. Quae contemplantes expendere oportebit, quid quisque habeat sui, eaque moderari nee velle experiri, quam se aliena deceant; id enim maxime quemque decet, quod est cuiusque maxime suum. 1.114. Suum quisque igitur noscat ingenium acremque se et bonorum et vitiorum suorum iudicem praebeat, ne scaenici plus quam nos videantur habere prudentiae. Illi enim non optimas, sed sibi accommodatissimas fabulas eligunt; qui voce freti sunt, Epigonos Medumque, qui gestu, Melanippam, Clytemnestram, semper Rupilius, quem ego memini, Antiopam, non saepe Aesopus Aiacem. Ergo histrio hoc videbit in scaena, non videbit sapiens vir in vita? Ad quas igitur res aptissimi erimus, in iis potissimum elaborabimus; sin aliquando necessitas nos ad ea detruserit, quae nostri ingenii non erunt, omnis adhibenda erit cura, meditatio, diligentia, ut ea si non decore, at quam minime indecore facere possimus; nec tam est enitendum, ut bona, quae nobis data non sint, sequamur, quam ut vitia fugiamus. 1.113.  How much Ulysses endured on those long wanderings, when he submitted to the service even of women (if Circe and Calypso may be called women) and strove in every word to be courteous and complaisant to all! And, arrived at home, he brooked even the insults of his men-servants and maidservants, in order to attain in the end the object of his desire. But Ajax, with the temper he is represented as having, would have chosen to meet death a thousand times rather than suffer such indignities! If we take this into consideration, we shall see that it is each man's duty to weigh well what are his own peculiar traits of character, to regulate these properly, and not to wish to try how another man's would suit him. For the more peculiarly his own a man's character is, the better it fits him. 1.114.  Everyone, therefore, should make a proper estimate of his own natural ability and show himself a critical judge of his own merits and defects; in this respect we should not let actors display more practical wisdom than we have. They select, not the best plays, but the ones best suited to their talents. Those who rely most upon the quality of their voice take the Epigoni and the Medus; those who place more stress upon the action choose the Melanippa and the Clytaemnestra; Rupilius, whom I remember, always played in the Antiope, Aesopus rarely in the Ajax. Shall a player have regard to this in choosing his rôle upon the stage, and a wise man fail to do so in selecting his part in life? We shall, therefore, work to the best advantage in that rôle to which we are best adapted. But if at some time stress of circumstances shall thrust us aside into some uncongenial part, we must devote to it all possible thought, practice, and pains, that we may be able to perform it, if not with propriety, at least with as little impropriety as possible; and we need not strive so hard to attain to points of excellence that have not been vouchsafed to us as to correct the faults we have.
2. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.1.2, 1.12, 2.1.3-2.1.4, 2.2.2, 2.3.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 83.26, 88.7, 99.17, 121.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Seneca The Younger, Medea, 395, 385 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 626 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acting, and selfhood Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
aristotle, influence on seneca Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
aristotle, later aristotelians Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
aristotle, on brutishness Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
becker, lawrence Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
behaviour, and decorum Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 39, 40
brutishness Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
character, fictional, human qualities of Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 39, 40, 46
cicero, and persona theory Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
cicero, on species-level classification Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
constantia Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
decorum, and medea Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
decorum, in cicero Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
drunkenness, and brutishness Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
emotions, as contumacious Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
emotions, examples of Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
emotions, moderation in (metriopatheia) Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
emotions, modern theories Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
eupatheiai, classified by species Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
identity, and habitual conduct Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 46
identity, and stoic constantia Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 39, 40
identity, and stoic decorum Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
inwood, brad Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
jason Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 46
medea, and decorum Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
medea, and self-coherence Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 39, 40, 46
medea, and the stoic sapiens Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 39, 40
metriopatheia (moderation in emotion) Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
movements, three movements in seneca Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
peripatetics Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
persona, in stoic ethics Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 39, 40
plato, on brutishness Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
reaching (orexis) Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
repetition, as motif in medea' Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 46
selection Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
seneca, and aristotle Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
seneca, three movements, Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
stoicism, and decorum Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
stoicism, and persona theory Bexley, Seneca's Characters: Fictional Identities and Implied Human Selves (2022) 40
theophrastus Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243
tyrants Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 243