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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10243
Seneca The Younger, Letters, 89.11


nanThe Epicureans held that philosophy was twofold, natural and moral; they did away with the rational branch. Then, when they were compelled by the facts themselves to distinguish between equivocal ideas and to expose fallacies that lay hidden under the cloak of truth they themselves also introduced a heading to which they give the name "forensic and regulative," which is merely "rational" under another name, although they hold that this section is accessory to the department of "natural" philosophy.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 1.63 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.63. optime vero Epicurus, quod exiguam dixit fortunam intervenire sapienti maximasque ab eo et ab eo et om. R et ( ante gravissimas) om. V gravissimas res consilio ipsius et ratione administrari neque maiorem voluptatem ex infinito tempore aetatis percipi posse, quam ex hoc percipiatur, quod videamus esse finitum. In dialectica autem vestra nullam existimavit esse nec ad melius vivendum nec ad commodius disserendum viam. viam om. R In physicis plurimum posuit. ea scientia et verborum vis et natura orationis et consequentium repugtiumve ratio potest perspici. percipi R omnium autem rerum natura cognita levamur superstitione, liberamur mortis metu, non conturbamur ignoratione rerum, e qua ipsa horribiles existunt saepe formidines. denique etiam morati melius erimus, cum didicerimus quid natura desideret. tum vero, si stabilem scientiam rerum tenebimus, servata illa, quae quasi delapsa de caelo est ad cognitionem omnium, regula, ad quam omnia iudicia rerum omnium rerum regula R 1 dirigentur, numquam ullius oratione victi sententia desistemus.
2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 4.513-4.521 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.28.28-1.28.30, 2.11.20, 2.11.22-2.11.25, 3.3.14-3.3.15, 4.12.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Epictetus, Enchiridion, 1.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 7.211-7.216, 7.248, 7.426 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

6. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.27, 10.30, 10.32 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.27. hence he has frequently repeated himself and set down the first thought that occurred to him, and in his haste has left things unrevised, and he has so many citations that they alone fill his books: nor is this unexampled in Zeno and Aristotle. Such, then, in number and character are the writings of Epicurus, the best of which are the following:of Nature, thirty-seven books.of Atoms and Void.of Love.Epitome of Objections to the Physicists.Against the Megarians.Problems.Sovran Maxims.of Choice and Avoidance.of the End.of the Standard, a work entitled Canon.Chaeredemus.of the Gods.of Piety. 10.30. Canonic forms the introduction to the system and is contained in a single work entitled The Canon. The physical part includes the entire theory of Nature: it is contained in the thirty-seven books of Nature and, in a summary form, in the letters. The ethical part deals with the facts of choice and aversion: this may be found in the books On Human Life, in the letters, and in his treatise of the End. The usual arrangement, however, is to conjoin canonic with physics, and the former they call the science which deals with the standard and the first principle, or the elementary part of philosophy, while physics proper, they say, deals with becoming and perishing and with nature; ethics, on the other hand, deals with things to be sought and avoided, with human life and with the end-in-chief. 10.32. Nor is there anything which can refute sensations or convict them of error: one sensation cannot convict another and kindred sensation, for they are equally valid; nor can one sensation refute another which is not kindred but heterogeneous, for the objects which the two senses judge are not the same; nor again can reason refute them, for reason is wholly dependent on sensation; nor can one sense refute another, since we pay equal heed to all. And the reality of separate perceptions guarantees the truth of our senses. But seeing and hearing are just as real as feeling pain. Hence it is from plain facts that we must start when we draw inferences about the unknown. For all our notions are derived from perceptions, either by actual contact or by analogy, or resemblance, or composition, with some slight aid from reasoning. And the objects presented to mad-men and to people in dreams are true, for they produce effects – i.e. movements in the mind – which that which is unreal never does.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcinous Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
aristotle, on parts of philosophy Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 21
canon and criterion of truth Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
cicero Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
epictetus Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
epicurus and epicureans Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
lucretius Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
participation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
parts of philosophy, aristotle on Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 21
parts of philosophy, epicurus on Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 21
parts of philosophy Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 21
rule Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
seneca Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
truth Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 144
wisdom (sophia), as knowledge of human and divine matters Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 21
wisdom (sophia), correspondence with parts of philosophy' Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 21