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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10243
Seneca The Younger, Letters, 82.14


nanIt is the day which fills it with light, and the night which steals the light away; thus it is with the things which we call indifferent and "middle," like riches, strength, beauty, titles, kingship, and their opposites, – death, exile, ill-health, pain, and all such evils, the fear of which upsets us to a greater or less extent; it is the wickedness or the virtue that bestows the name of good or evil. An object is not by its own essence either hot or cold; it is heated when thrown into a furnace, and chilled when dropped into water. Death is honourable when related to that which is honourable; by this I mean virtue and a soul that despises the worst hardships.


nanIt is the day which fills it with light, and the night which steals the light away; thus it is with the things which we call indifferent and "middle,"[10] like riches, strength, beauty, titles, kingship, and their opposites, – death, exile, ill-health, pain, and all such evils, the fear of which upsets us to a greater or less extent; it is the wickedness or the virtue that bestows the name of good or evil. An object is not by its own essence either hot or cold; it is heated when thrown into a furnace, and chilled when dropped into water. Death is honourable when related to that which is honourable; by this I mean virtue and a soul that despises the worst hardships.


nanLucius Piso, the Director of Public Safety at Rome, was drunk from the very time of his appointment. He used to spend the greater part of the night at banquets, and would sleep until noon. That was the way he spent his morning hours. Nevertheless, he applied himself most diligently to his official duties, which included the guardianship of the city. Even the sainted Augustus trusted him with secret orders when he placed him in command of Thrace.[10] Piso conquered that country. Tiberius, too, trusted him when he took his holiday in Campania, leaving behind him in the city many a critical matter that aroused both suspicion and hatred.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 3.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.53. quoniam autem omne, quod est bonum, primum locum tenere dicimus, necesse est nec bonum esse nec malum hoc, quod praepositum praepositum edd. propositum vel praecipuum nominamus. idque ita definimus; quod sit indifferens cum aestimatione mediocri; quod enim illi a)dia/foron dicunt, id mihi ita occurrit, ut indifferens dicerem. neque enim illud fieri poterat ullo modo, ut nihil relinqueretur in mediis, quod aut secundum naturam esset aut contra, nec, cum id relinqueretur, nihil in his poni, quod satis satis om. A aestimabile esset, nec hoc posito non aliqua esse esse P. Man. esset praeposita. recte igitur haec facta distinctio est, atque etiam ab iis, quo facilius res perspici possit, hoc simile ponitur: 3.53.  But since we declare that everything that is good occupies the first rank, it follows that this which we entitle preferred or superior is neither good nor evil; and accordingly we define it as being indifferent but possessed of a moderate value — since it has occurred to me that I may use the word 'indifferent' to represent their term adiaphoron. For in fact, it was inevitable that the class of intermediate things should contain some things that were either in accordance with nature, or the reverse, and this being so, that this class should include some things which possessed moderate value, and, granting this, that some things of this class should be 'preferred.'
2. Cicero, On Duties, 3.53 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.53. Immo vero, inquiet ille, necesse est, siquidem meministi esse inter homines natura coniunctam societatem. Memini, inquiet ille; sed num ista societas talis est, ut nihil suum cuiusque sit? Quod si ila est, ne vendendum quidem quicquam est, sed dodum. Vides in hac tota disceptatione non illud dici: Quamvis hoc turpe sit, tamen, quoniam expedit, faciam, sed ita expedire, ut turpe non sit, ex altera autem parte, ea re, quia turpe sit, non esse faciendum. 3.53.  "Yea," Antipater will say, "but you are, as you must admit, if you will only bethink you of the bonds of fellowship forged by Nature and existing between man and man." "I do not forget them," the other will reply: but do you mean to say that those bonds of fellowship are such that there is no such thing as private property? If that is the case, we should not sell anything at all, but freely give everything away." In this whole discussion, you see, no one says, "However wrong morally this or that may be, still, since it is expedient, I will do it"; but the one side asserts that a given act is expedient, without being morally wrong, while the other insists that the act should not be done, because it is morally wrong.
3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.10-1.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.10. num nunc ex. num K 1 te illa terrent, triceps apud inferos Cerberus, Cocyti coyc ti R 1 fremitus, travectio traiectio ex trav. K 1 transv. V c mg. ('al trans') g Trag. inc.111 Acherontis, mento summam aquam aquam trisyll. cf. Lachm. ad Lucr. 6, 552 quam Nonii L 1 A A attingens amnem Bue. adtinget ( vel -it) senextus Nonii L 1 A A enectus siti Tantalus? summam... tantalus Non. 401,29 enectus ... Tantalus Prisc, GL 2, 470, 18 tantulus X ( corr. K 2 ) Nonii et Prisciani pars tum illud, quod Sisyphus sisyphius X ( sed 2. eras. in V. sis. K 1 aut c ) Nonii pars versat versus? cf. Marx ad Lucil. 1375 saxum sudans nitendo neque proficit hilum? tum ... hlium Non. 121,4; 353, 8. fortasse etiam inexorabiles iudices, Minos et Rhadamanthus? apud quos nec te L. Crassus defendet defendet om. RK 1 ( add. 2 ) nec M. Antonius nec, quoniam apud Graecos iudices res agetur, poteris adhibere Demosthenen; demostenen K tibi ipsi pro te erit maxima corona causa dicenda. dicenda causa K haec fortasse metuis et idcirco mortem censes esse sempiternum malum. Adeone me delirare censes, ut ista esse credam? An tu ante G 1 haec non an tu an non ( 2. an in r. ) V 1? credis? Minime vero. Male hercule narras. Cur? quaeso. Quia disertus dissertus KR 1 esse possem, si contra ista dicerem. Quis enim non in eius modi causa? aut quid negotii est haec poëtarum et pictorum portenta convincere? aut convincere Non. 375, 29 1.11. Atqui pleni libri sunt contra ista ipsa disserentium dissenentium G 1 (dissotium corr. G 1? ) RV 1 ( corr. ipse? ) diserentium K philosophorum. Inepte sane. quis enim est est om. K 1, add. c tam excors, quem ista moveant? commoveant V 2 Si ergo apud inferos miseri non sunt, ne sunt quidem apud inferos ulli. Ita prorsus prossus G existimo. Ubi sunt Inde ab ubi - 223, 24 iam sunt multa in K madore corrupta ergo i, quos miseros dicis, aut quem locum incolunt? si enim sunt, nusquam esse non possunt. Ego vero nusquam esse illos puto. Igitur ne esse quidem? Prorsus isto modo, et tamen miseros miseros cf. Serv. Aen. 4, 20 ob id ipsum quidem, quidem om. K quia nulli sint.
4. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Marciam, 19.4-19.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Seneca The Younger, De Vita Beata (Dialogorum Liber Vii), 22.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 24.18, 36.10, 54.4-54.5, 82.10, 82.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
body, imprisonment of the soul Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
body politic, reincarnation Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
choice / decision / αἵρεσις Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 119
cicero Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471, 486
contemplation, cosmos, contemplation of Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 486
death, afterlife Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471, 486
death, consolatory writings Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471, 486
death, socrates death Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 486
death, suicide Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
emotions, fear Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
epicurus Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
ethics Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 486
evil Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 119
experience, religious, feelings Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471, 486
hades Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
indifferents / indifferentia / ἀδιάφορα Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 119
knowledge, wise man Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 486
lucretius Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
mythology Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
plato, platonism Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
politics and religion Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
seneca Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471, 486
seneca l. anneus Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 119
soul, life as punishment of soul Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
soul Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471, 486
stoicism, stoic views' Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 486
stoicism, stoic views Rüpke, The individual in the religions of the ancient Mediterranean (2014) 471
will / voluntas / βούλησις Maso, CIcero's Philosophy (2022) 119