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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10243
Seneca The Younger, Letters, 78.15


nanBut when set in the very midst of troubles one should say: Perchance some day the memory of this sorrow Will even bring delight. Let such a man fight against them with all his might: if he once gives way, he will be vanquished; but if he strives against his sufferings, he will conquer. As it is, however, what most men do is to drag down upon their own heads a falling ruin which they ought to try to support. If you begin to withdraw your support from that which thrusts toward you and totters and is ready to plunge, it will follow you and lean more heavily upon you; but if you hold your ground and make up your mind to push against it, it will be forced back.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Aristotle, Rhetoric, 1.11 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 2.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.96. Audi, ne longe abeam, moriens quid dicat Epicurus, ut intellegas intellegas (intellig.) BEA 2 intellegat A 1 intelligat R intelligantur N intelligatur V facta eius cum dictis discrepare: 'Epicurus Hermarcho salutem. Cum ageremus', inquit, vitae beatum et eundem supremum diem, scribebamus haec. tanti autem autem om. A aderant aderant om. BE vesicae et torminum morbi, ut nihil ad eorum magnitudinem posset accedere. Miserum hominem! Si dolor summum malum est, dici aliter non potest. sed audiamus ipsum: 'Compensabatur', inquit, tamen cum his omnibus animi laetitia, quam capiebam memoria rationum inventorumque nostrorum. sed tu, ut dignum est tua erga me et philosophiam me et philosophiam Bai. me (ne R) et philosophia A 1 RN me philosophia BE me et philosophia et A 2 V voluntate ab adolescentulo suscepta, fac ut Metrodori tueare liberos. 2.96.  "But I must not digress too far. Let me repeat the dying words of Epicurus, to prove to you the discrepancy between his practice and his principles: 'Epicurus to Hermarchus, greeting. I write these words,' he says, 'on the happiest, and the last, day of my life. I am suffering from diseases of the bladder and intestines, which are of the utmost possible severity.' Unhappy creature! If pain is the Chief Evil, that is the only thing to be said. But let us hear his own words. 'Yet all my sufferings,' he continues, 'are counterbalanced by the joy which I derive from remembering my theories and discoveries. I charge you, by the devotion which from your youth up you have displayed towards myself and towards philosophy, to protect the children of Metrodorus.'
3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 3.33, 3.76, 5.74, 5.88 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.33. Levationem autem aegritudinis in duabus rebus ponit, avocatione a cogitanda molestia et revocatione revocationem GKV 1 ad contemplandas voluptates. parere pareri GR 1 ( corr. 1 ) V 1 ( corr. 2 ) enim censet animum rationi posse et, quo illa ducat, sequi. vetat igitur ratio intueri molestias, abstrahit ab acerbis cogitationibus, hebetem habetem V 1 aciem ad miserias contemplandas facit; facit add. V c ( ante aciem We. ft. rectius cf. docere 220,13 sed cf. off. 1, 12 extr. al. ) om. cett. a quibus cum cecinit cecidit X corr. 2 receptui, inpellit receptuimpellit VHK c (receptaimp. K 1 )G 2 (receptum pellit 1 ) receptū impellit R rursum et incitat ad conspiciendas totaque mente contrectandas contractandas K ( ex -tes 1 ) H varias voluptates, vetat... 335, 4 voluptates H quibus ille et praeteritarum memoria et spe consequentium sapientis vitam refertam putat. refert amputat G 1 R 1 V 1 Haec nostro more nos diximus, Epicurii epicurei R c K 2 dicunt suo; sed quae quae ex qui V 2 dicant, videamus, quo modo, neglegamus. 3.76. sunt qui unum officium consolantis cons olantis R 1 consulantis GK 1 V 1 putent putent docere Lb. Cleanthes fr. 576 malum illud omnino non esse, ut Cleanthi placet; sunt qui non magnum malum, ut Peripatetici; sunt qui abducant a malis ad bona, ut Epicurus; sunt qui satis satis om. G 1 putent ostendere nihil inopinati inopiti GRV 1 (n exp. c ) opiti K accidisse, ut Cyrenaici lac. stat. Po. ut Cyrenaici pro nihil mali (nihil a mali V 1 ) Dav. cogitari potest: ut Cyr. atque hi quoque, si verum quaeris, efficere student ut non multum adesse videatur aut nihil mall. Chr. cf. § 52–59. 61 extr. Chrys. fr. eth. 486 nihil mali. Chrysippus autem caput esse censet in consolando detrahere detra in r. V c illam opinionem maerentis, qua se maerentis se X (mer. KR) qd add. V 2 maerentis si vel maerentl si s ( sed sec. Chr. omnes qui maerent in illa opinione sunt; non recte p. 275, 19 confert Va. Op. 1, 70 ) qua Po. officio fungi putet iusto atque debito. sunt etiam qui haec omnia genera consolandi colligant abducunt... 21 putant... 356, 2 colligunt X 356, 2 colligant V 2 abducant et putent Ern. ( obloq. Küh. Sey. cf. tamen nat. deor. 2, 82 al. ). inconcinnitatem modorum def. Gaffiot cf. ad p. 226, 23 —alius enim alio modo movetur—, ut fere nos in Consolatione omnia omnia bis scripsit, prius erasit G omnia exp. et in mg. scr. fecimus. omne genus consolandi V c in consolationem unam coniecimus; erat enim in tumore animus, et omnis in eo temptabatur curatio. sed sumendum tempus est non minus in animorum morbis quam in corporum; ut Prometheus ille Aeschyli, cui cum dictum esset: Atqui/, Prometheu, te ho/c tenere exi/stimo, Mede/ri posse ra/tionem ratione ratione G 1 RV 1 ( alterum exp. G 2 V 1 ratione rationem K 1 (ratione del. K 2 ) orationem Stephanus ( ft. recte cf. lo/goi ) iracu/ndiae, v. 377 respondit: Siquide/m qui qui et ss. V c tempesti/vam medicinam a/dmovens Non a/dgravescens adgr. ss. V c vo/lnus inlida/t manu. manus X s exp. V 5.74. nec vero illa sibi remedia comparavit ad tolerandum tollerandum X (toll endum G 1 ) dolorem, firmitatem animi, turpitudinis verecundiam, exercitationem consuetudinemque patiendi, praecepta fortitudinis, praecepta fortitudinis del.Sey.sed Cic.l.2,34—41 exercitationem consuetudinemque,postea (cf. maxime 51. 53) praecepta fortitudinis animo proposita (p.313,15sqq.) valere ad tolerandum dolorem exponit (cf.p.285.6 295, 24sqq.fin.2,94.95; 4, 31). cf.etiam Plasberg, Festschrift f. Vahlen p.234 (obloq. Se.,Jb.d.ph.V.29 p.97) duritiam virilem, sed una se dicit recordatione adquiescere praeteritarum voluptatium, voluptatum Bai.cf.Neue 1, 410 ut si quis aestuans, cum vim caloris non non postea add. R 1 facile patiatur, patiatur putatur V 1 recordari velit sese sese s esse X (se V 3 ) aliquando in Arpinati nostro gelidis fluminibus circumfusum fuisse. non enim video, quo modo sedare possint 5.88. nam quae tibi Epicuri quae...Epicuri s quod...Epicurus X (epyc.G 8.13 ut saepe ) videtur, eadem erit Hieronymi et Carneadis causa et hercule omnium reliquorum. quis enim parum est contra mortem morem V 1 aut dolorem paratus? Ordiamur ordinamur X ( corr. V rec ) ab eo, si placet, quem mollem, quem voluptarium dicimus. quid? is tibi mortemne videtur aut aut s (Vind.)an X dolorem timere, qui eum diem, quo moritur, beatum appellat Epic.fr.122 maxumisque doloribus adfectus affectus KR eos ipsos inventorum suorum memoria et recordatione confutat? confutat? signum interrogandi vulgo non hic sed post timere ( v.19 ) ponunt. nec haec sic agit, ut ex tempore quasi effuttire effuttire GKR effutire V (K c in mg. ) Non. videatur. nec...videatur Non.103,21 de morte enim ita ita s ista X ( cf. 441, 19 ) Epic. sent. sel.2 sentit, ut dissoluto animante sensum extinctum putet, quod autem sensu careat, nihil ad nos id iudicet pertinere. item in in add. Se.de s om. X dolore certa habet quae sequatur, cuius cuius Bentl. (cf. fin. 1,40) quorum magnitudinem brevitate consolatur, longinquitatem levitate. levitate s lenitate (laen.KR)X
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

26. But we must not be ignorant that repentance occupies the second place only, next after perfection, just as the change from sickness to convalescence is inferior to perfect uninterrupted health. Therefore, that which is continuous and perfect in virtues is very near divine power, but that condition which is improvement advancing in process of time is the peculiar blessing of a welldisposed soul, which does not continue in its childish pursuits, but by more vigorous thoughts and inclinations, such as really become a man, seeks a tranquil steadiness of soul, and which attains to it by its conception of what is good. V.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.103 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.103. For it would be mere folly that some men should be excluded from the priesthood by reason of the scars which exist on their bodies from ancient wounds, which are the emblem of misfortune indeed, but not of wickedness; but that those persons who, not at all out of necessity but from their own deliberate choice, have made a market of their beauty, when at last they slowly repent, should at once after leaving their lovers become united to priests, and should come from brothels and be admitted into the sacred precincts. For the scars and impressions of their old offences remain not the less in the souls of those who repent.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 177 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

177. For absolutely never to do anything wrong at all is a peculiar attribute of God, and perhaps one may also say of a God-like man. But when one has erred, then to change so as to adopt a blameless course of life for the future is the part of a wise man, and of one who is not altogether ignorant of what is expedient.
7. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.203 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then
8. Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.207-7.213, 8.820-8.822, 8.831-8.833, 8.835-8.837, 8.843-8.846 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.22 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.22. And when near his end he wrote the following letter to Idomeneus:On this blissful day, which is also the last of my life, I write this to you. My continual sufferings from strangury and dysentery are so great that nothing could augment them; but over against them all I set gladness of mind at the remembrance of our past conversations. But I would have you, as becomes your life-long attitude to me and to philosophy, watch over the children of Metrodorus.Such were the terms of his will.Among his disciples, of whom there were many, the following were eminent: Metrodorus, the son of Athenaeus (or of Timocrates) and of Sande, a citizen of Lampsacus, who from his first acquaintance with Epicurus never left him except once for six months spent on a visit to his native place, from which he returned to him again.
10. Augustine, Confessions, 10.14, 10.21.30 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

10.14. 21. This same memory contains also the affections of my mind; not in the manner in which the mind itself contains them when it suffers them, but very differently according to a power peculiar to memory. For without being joyous, I remember myself to have had joy; and without being sad, I call to mind my past sadness; and that of which I was once afraid, I remember without fear; and without desire recall a former desire. Again, on the contrary, I at times remember when joyous my past sadness, and when sad my joy. Which is not to be wondered at as regards the body; for the mind is one thing, the body another. If I, therefore, when happy, recall some past bodily pain, it is not so strange a thing. But now, as this very memory itself is mind (for when we give orders to have a thing kept in memory, we say, See that you bear this in mind; and when we forget a thing, we say, It did not enter my mind, and, It slipped from my mind, thus calling the memory itself mind), as this is so, how comes it to pass that when being joyful I remember my past sorrow, the mind has joy, the memory sorrow - the mind, from the joy than is in it, is joyful, yet the memory, from the sadness that is in it, is not sad? Does not the memory perchance belong unto the mind? Who will say so? The memory doubtless is, so to say, the belly of the mind, and joy and sadness like sweet and bitter food, which, when entrusted to the memory, are, as it were, passed into the belly, where they can be reposited, but cannot taste. It is ridiculous to imagine these to be alike; and yet they are not utterly unlike. 22. But behold, out of my memory I educe it, when I affirm that there be four perturbations of the mind - desire, joy, fear, sorrow; and whatsoever I shall be able to dispute on these, by dividing each into its peculiar species, and by defining it, there I find what I may say, and thence I educe it; yet am I not disturbed by any of these perturbations when by remembering them I call them to mind; and before I recollected and reviewed them, they were there; wherefore by remembrance could they be brought thence. Perchance, then, even as meat is in ruminating brought up out of the belly, so by calling to mind are these educed from the memory. Why, then, does not the disputant, thus recollecting, perceive in the mouth of his meditation the sweetness of joy or the bitterness of sorrow? Is the comparison unlike in this because not like in all points? For who would willingly discourse on these subjects, if, as often as we name sorrow or fear, we should be compelled to be sorrowful or fearful? And yet we could never speak of them, did we not find in our memory not merely the sounds of the names, according to the images imprinted on it by the senses of the body, but the notions of the things themselves, which we never received by any door of the flesh, but which the mind itself, recognising by the experience of its own passions, entrusted to the memory, or else which the memory itself retained without their being entrusted to it.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; for philo, repentance and pity Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
aristotle, pleasure at memory of pain endured Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
attention, epicurean therapy distracts attention Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
augustine, distress at memory of pleasure lost, pleasure at memory of pain endured Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
boethius, neoplatonizing christian, distress at memory of pleasure lost Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
commercialism and egypt Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
confession Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
distress, distress at memory of lost pleasure Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
egypt, tourist destination Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
epicurus, distracting attention as therapy, esp. to past Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
epicurus, memory of past, value of Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
frank criticism Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
jupiter (also zeus) Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
memory, therapeutic value Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
nile, past and present Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
past, present, future, memory of past, therapeutic value or disvalue Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
past, present, future, repentance Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
pelusium, mouth of the nile Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, repentance valued Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
pleasure, pleasure at memory of pain endured Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
plutarch of chaeroneia, middle platonist, memory, value of Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
plutarch of chaeroneia, middle platonist, weaving life together autobiographically Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
pompey (gnaeus pompeius magnus), escapes the nile in lucan Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
red sea Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
revisionism, of egypt and the nile Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
seneca, the younger, stoic, pleasure at memory of pain endured Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
simplicius, repentance Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
therapy, memory, value of Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
therapy, techniques see esp. Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233
tombs, of pompey Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 53
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia)' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 233