Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10243
Seneca The Younger, Letters, 18.4


nanIt shows much more courage to remain dry and sober when the mob is drunk and vomiting; but it shows greater self-control to refuse to withdraw oneself and to do what the crowd does, but in a different way, – thus neither making oneself conspicuous nor becoming one of the crowd. For one may keep holiday without extravagance.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Horace, Ars Poetica, 232-233, 231 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Horace, Sermones, 2.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.7. and, in the second place, he accuses those Jews that are inhabitants of Alexandria; as, in the third place, he mixes with these things such accusations as concern the sacred purifications, with the other legal rites used in the temple. /p 2.7. These Egyptians therefore were the authors of these troubles, who not having the constancy of Macedonians, nor the prudence of Grecians, indulged all of them the evil manners of the Egyptians, and continued their ancient hatred against us;
4. Propertius, Elegies, 2.19.13-2.19.14, 4.4.73-4.4.76 (1st cent. BCE

5. Tibullus, Elegies, 2.5.87-2.5.88 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Martial, Epigrams, 14.1.1, 14.142 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Martial, Epigrams, 14.1.1, 14.142 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 37 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 37 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.21.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 7.1, 7.3, 18.5-18.13, 114.3-114.4, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Suetonius, Nero, 51, 27 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Tacitus, Annals, 14.15-14.16, 14.21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.15.  Reluctant, however, as yet to expose his dishonour on a public stage, he instituted the so‑called Juvenile Games, for which a crowd of volunteers enrolled themselves. Neither rank, nor age, nor an official career debarred a man from practising the art of a Greek or a Latin mummer, down to attitudes and melodies never meant for the male sex. Even women of distinction studied indecent parts; and in the grove with which Augustus fringed his Naval Lagoon, little trysting-places and drinking-dens sprang up, and every incentive to voluptuousness was exposed for sale. Distributions of coin, too, were made, for the respectable man to expend under compulsion and the prodigal from vainglory. Hence debauchery and scandal throve; nor to our morals, corrupted long before, has anything contributed more of uncleanness than that herd of reprobates. Even in the decent walks of life, purity is hard to keep: far less could chastity or modesty or any vestige of integrity survive in that competition of the vices. — Last of all to tread the stage was the sovereign himself, scrupulously testing his lyre and striking a few preliminary notes to the trainers at his side. A cohort of the guards had been added to the audience — centurions and tribunes; Burrus, also, with his sigh and his word of praise. Now, too, for the first time was enrolled the company of Roman knights known as the Augustiani; conspicuously youthful and robust; wanton in some cases by nature; in others, through dreams of power. Days and nights they thundered applause, bestowed the epithets reserved for deity upon the imperial form and voice, and lived in a repute and honour, which might have been earned by virtue. 14.16.  And yet, lest it should be only the histrionic skill of the emperor which won publicity, he affected also a zeal for poetry and gathered a group of associates with some faculty for versification but not such as to have yet attracted remark. These, after dining, sat with him, devising a connection for the lines they had brought from home or invented on the spot, and eking out the phrases suggested, for better or worse, by their master; the method being obvious even from the general cast of the poems, which run without energy or inspiration and lack unity of style. Even to the teachers of philosophy he accorded a little time — but after dinner, and in order to amuse himself by the wrangling which attended the exposition of their conflicting dogmas. Nor was there any dearth of gloomy-browed and sad-eyed sages eager to figure among the diversions of majesty. 14.21.  It was this very prospect of licence which attracted the majority; and yet their pretexts were decently phrased:— "Even our ancestors had not been averse from amusing themselves with spectacles in keeping with the standard of wealth in their day; and that was the reason why actors had been imported from Etruria and horse-races from Thurii. Since the annexation of Achaia and Asia, games had been exhibited in a more ambitious style; and yet, at Rome, no one born in a respectable rank of life had condescended to the stage as a profession, though it was now two hundred years since the triumph of Lucius Mummius, who first gave an exhibition of the kind in the capital. But, more than this, it had been a measure of economy when the theatre was housed in a permanent building instead of being reared and razed, year after year, at enormous expense. Again, the magistrates would not have the same drain upon their private resources, nor the populace the same excuse for demanding contests in the Greek style from the magistrates, when the cost was defrayed by the state. The victories of orators and poets would apply a spur to genius; nor need it lie heavy on the conscience of any judge, if he had not turned a deaf ear to reputable arts and to legitimate pleasures. It was to gaiety, rather than to wantonness, that a few nights were being given out of five whole years — nights in which, owing to the blaze of illuminations, nothing illicit could be concealed." The display in question, it must be granted, passed over without any glaring scandal; and there was no outbreak, even slight, of popular partisanship, since the pantomimic actors, though restored to the stage, were debarred from the sacred contests. The first prize for eloquence was not awarded, but an announcement was made that the Caesar had proved victorious. The Greek dress, in which a great number of spectators had figured during the festival, immediately went out of vogue.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ambarvalia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
anger Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
architecture Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
augustus Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
avaritia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
awakening Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
banquets Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149, 150, 151, 152, 180
caligula, c. iulius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
cena Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
circus maximus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
clothing Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149, 150, 151, 152, 180
conversion, philosophical Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
cynthia (in propertius) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
disposition Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
encolpius Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
eros Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
exhortation, paraenesis Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
festivals Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
fortunata Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
freedom Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
games, public Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
greediness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
immanent Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
impression Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
ingenium Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
julius caesar, and cicero Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
lascivia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
love / eros Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
lucilius iunior Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 150, 151, 152
ludi iuvenalium Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
lust vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
maecenas, c. clinius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
maecenas Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
mind Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
moderation Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
nature Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149, 152
nero (emperor) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
nero claudius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 152
night Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149
palilia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
perversion Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 150, 151, 152
philosophy, philosophical Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
pleasure Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 150, 151, 152, 180
poverty vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 152
private lives Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
rational Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
relationship Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
religions, roman, festivals' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 84
saturnalia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149, 150, 151, 152
self Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
seneca the younger Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
sobrietas Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 150, 151, 152, 180
socrates Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 151, 152
soul Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
stoicism Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149, 150, 151, 152
stomach Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
strength Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
terentia Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
trimalchio Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
truth Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
vigilance Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 190
virtue Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149, 150, 151, 152
vomit Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 149, 150, 151, 152
warm Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 150, 151, 152
wealth Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 71
wine Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 150, 151, 152, 180
wise man Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 151