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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10243
Seneca The Younger, Letters, 12.9


nanThus Pacuvius had himself carried out to burial every day. Let us, however, do from a good motive what he used to do from a debased motive; let us go to our sleep with joy and gladness; let us say: I have lived; the course which Fortune set for me Is finished.[9] And if God is pleased to add another day, we should welcome it with glad hearts. That man is happiest, and is secure in his own possession of himself, who can await the morrow without apprehension. When a man has said: "I have lived!", every morning he arises he receives a bonus.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 3.29-3.30, 3.33, 3.58, 5.96 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.29. haec igitur praemeditatio futurorum malorum lenit eorum adventum, quae venientia longe ante videris. itaque apud Euripiden a Theseo dicta laudantur; licet Eurip. fr. 964 euripidĕ K thesseo GKR 1 enim, ut saepe facimus, in Latinum illa convertere: Nam qui hae/c audita a do/cto meminisse/m viro, Futu/ras mecum co/mmentabar mi/serias: Aut mo/rtem acerbam aut alt. aut add. G 2 exilii X e/xili maesta/m fugam Aut se/mper aliquam mo/lem meditaba/r mali, Ut, si/ qua invecta di/ritas casu/ foret, Ne me i/nparatum cu/ra lacerare/t repens. lacerare trepens G 1 R 1 3.30. quod autem Theseus a docto se audisse dicit, id de se ipso de ipso K 1 ( ex dese ipse) V 1 (se add. 1 ) Anax. A 33 loquitur Euripides. fuerat enim auditor Anaxagorae, quem ferunt nuntiata morte filii dixisse: sciebam me genuisse mortalem. quae vox declarat is esse haec acerba, quibus non fuerint cogitata. ergo id quidem non dubium, quin omnia, quae mala putentur, sint inprovisa graviora. itaque quamquam non haec una res efficit maximam aegritudinem, tamen, quoniam multum potest provisio animi et praeparatio ad minuendum dolorem, sint semper omnia homini humana meditata. et et ex e V c nimirum haec est illa praestans et divina sapientia, et perceptas penitus et pertractatas res humanas habere, nihil admirari, ammirari GR 1 V cum acciderit, nihil, ante quam evenerit, non evenire posse arbitrari. Quam ob rem o/mnis, cum secu/ndae res sunt ma/xume, tum ma/xume tum maxume add. K c maxime alt. loco GRV bis H Medita/ri secum opo/rtet, quo pacto a/dversam adversum KRH aerumna/m ferant. fuerant H ferat K 1 Peri/cla, pericula X damna pe/regre rediens se/mper secum co/gitet, pericla damna exilia peregre rediens semper cogitet Ter. codd. Aut fi/li filii p. X peccatum au/t uxoris mo/rtem aut morbum fi/liae, Commu/nia esse haec, ne/ quid horum umquam a/ccidat animo/ novum; c. e. haec, fieri posse, ut ne quid animo sit novom Ter. Quicqui/d praeter praeter propter K spem eve/niat, omne id de/putare esse i/n lucro. ergo .. 22 lucro H ... 22 Ter. Phormio 241–6 ergo hoc hoc ex haec G 2 Terentius a philosophia sumptum cum tam commode dixerit, nos, e quorum fontibus id haustum est, non et dicemus hoc melius et constantius sentiemus? 3.33. Levationem autem aegritudinis in duabus rebus ponit, avocatione a cogitanda molestia et revocatione revocationem GKV 1 ad contemplandas voluptates. parere pareri GR 1 ( corr. 1 ) V 1 ( corr. 2 ) enim censet animum rationi posse et, quo illa ducat, sequi. vetat igitur ratio intueri molestias, abstrahit ab acerbis cogitationibus, hebetem habetem V 1 aciem ad miserias contemplandas facit; facit add. V c ( ante aciem We. ft. rectius cf. docere 220,13 sed cf. off. 1, 12 extr. al. ) om. cett. a quibus cum cecinit cecidit X corr. 2 receptui, inpellit receptuimpellit VHK c (receptaimp. K 1 )G 2 (receptum pellit 1 ) receptū impellit R rursum et incitat ad conspiciendas totaque mente contrectandas contractandas K ( ex -tes 1 ) H varias voluptates, vetat... 335, 4 voluptates H quibus ille et praeteritarum memoria et spe consequentium sapientis vitam refertam putat. refert amputat G 1 R 1 V 1 Haec nostro more nos diximus, Epicurii epicurei R c K 2 dicunt suo; sed quae quae ex qui V 2 dicant, videamus, quo modo, neglegamus. 3.58. similiter commemorandis exemplis orbitates quoque liberum liberorum V c praedicantur, eorumque, eorum quoque K 1 qui gravius ferunt, luctus aliorum exemplis leniuntur. sic perpessio ceterorum facit, ut ea quae acciderint multo minora maiora ex minora V c quam quanta sint existimata, videantur. ita fit, sensim cogitantibus ut, quantum sit ementita opinio, appareat. atque hoc idem et Telamo ille declarat: ego cum genui et Theseus: futuras mecum commentabar miserias tum morituros scivi et ei rei sustuli add. R 2, moriturum scivi V 3 et Anaxagoras: sciebam me genuisse mortalem. cf. p. 332, 9 sqq. hi enim omnes diu cogitantes de rebus humanis intellegebant eas nequaquam pro opinione volgi esse extimescendas. extimescendas KR 1 existimescendas R c G existimiscendas G 1 e corr. V et mihi quidem videtur idem fere accidere is qui ante meditantur, quod is quibus medetur dies, nisi quod ratio ratio V ratione GKR ( unde in hoc quae- dam 2? ) quaedam sanat illos, hos ipsa natura intellecto eo quod rem continet, illud illud continet X trp. B malum, quod opinatum sit esse maxumum, nequaquam esse tantum, ut vitam beatam possit evertere. 5.96. quocirca corpus gaudere tam diu, dum praesentem sentiret voluptatem, animum et praesentem percipere pariter cum corpore et prospicere venientem nec praeteritam praeterfluere sinere. ita perpetuas et contextas contestas ex contentas K c voluptates in sapiente fore semper, cum expectatio expectatione G 1 speratarum voluptatum cum cum add. Lb. perceptarum memoria iungeretur.
2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 3.947-3.949 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.653, 4.704-4.705 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.653. ome lengthening path to travel, or to seek 4.704. and boughs of mournful shade; and crowning all 4.705. he laid on nuptial bed the robes and sword
4. Seneca The Younger, De Beneficiis, 7.2.4-7.2.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Seneca The Younger, De Constantia Sapientis, 15.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 12.8, 59.15, 59.17, 78.16, 101.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Galen, On The Doctrines of Hippocrates And Plato, 4.7.9-4.7.11 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 2.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.93-2.96 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.93. They also held that nothing is just or honourable or base by nature, but only by convention and custom. Nevertheless the good man will be deterred from wrong-doing by the penalties imposed and the prejudices that it would arouse. Further that the wise man really exists. They allow progress to be attainable in philosophy as well as in other matters. They maintain that the pain of one man exceeds that of another, and that the senses are not always true and trustworthy.The school of Hegesias, as it is called, adopted the same ends, namely pleasure and pain. In their view there is no such thing as gratitude or friendship or beneficence, because it is not for themselves that we choose to do these things but simply from motives of interest, apart from which such conduct is nowhere found. 2.94. They denied the possibility of happiness, for the body is infected with much suffering, while the soul shares in the sufferings of the body and is a prey to disturbance, and fortune often disappoints. From all this it follows that happiness cannot be realized. Moreover, life and death are each desirable in turn. But that there is anything naturally pleasant or unpleasant they deny; when some men are pleased and others pained by the same objects, this is owing to the lack or rarity or surfeit of such objects. Poverty and riches have no relevance to pleasure; for neither the rich nor the poor as such have any special share in pleasure. 2.95. Slavery and freedom, nobility and low birth, honour and dishonour, are alike indifferent in a calculation of pleasure. To the fool life is advantageous, while to the wise it is a matter of indifference. The wise man will be guided in all he does by his own interests, for there is none other whom he regards as equally deserving. For supposing him to reap the greatest advantages from another, they would not be equal to what he contributes himself. They also disallow the claims of the senses, because they do not lead to accurate knowledge. Whatever appears rational should be done. They affirmed that allowance should be made for errors, for no man errs voluntarily, but under constraint of some suffering; that we should not hate men, but rather teach them better. The wise man will not have so much advantage over others in the choice of goods as in the avoidance of evils, making it his end to live without pain of body or mind. 2.96. This then, they say, is the advantage accruing to those who make no distinction between any of the objects which produce pleasure.The school of Anniceris in other respects agreed with them, but admitted that friendship and gratitude and respect for parents do exist in real life, and that a good man will sometimes act out of patriotic motives. Hence, if the wise man receive annoyance, he will be none the less happy even if few pleasures accrue to him. The happiness of a friend is not in itself desirable, for it is not felt by his neighbour. Instruction is not sufficient in itself to inspire us with confidence and to make us rise superior to the opinion of the multitude. Habits must be formed because of the bad disposition which has grown up in us from the first.
10. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 31.196 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

11. Augustine, Confessions, 4.8.13 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ambition Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
anaxagoras, presocratic, anticipate misfortune Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
anger Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
anticipation of misfortune, anaxagoras Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
anticipation of misfortune, distinguished fear Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
anticipation of misfortune, epictetus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
anticipation of misfortune, stoics Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
antiphon, sophist Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
banquets Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
carpe diem, survey of Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 22
dido Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 69, 71
diodorus (mentioned in senecas de vita beata) Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 69, 71
end or goal of life (telos), epicurus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
epicureans, hope, value of Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
epicurus, pleasure goal of life Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
euripides Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
fear, distinguished anticipation of misfortune Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
fool Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
gluttony Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
hegesias of cyrene Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 22
homer Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 69, 71
hope, disapproved by stoics, except for novices Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
hope, epicurus Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
impotentia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
indifferents, preferred and dispreferred, theory explained Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
lust vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
nan, aristippus of cyrene Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 22
nausea Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
night Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
odysseus Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 69, 71
past, present, future, do not pin hopes on future Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
past, present, future, hope approved Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
phaeacians Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 69, 71
pleasure, epicurus, pleasure goal of life Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
pleasure Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
progressing, emotions can be useful to the progressing novice Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
pythagoreans Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
seneca, lucius annaeus Rohland, Carpe Diem: The Poetics of Presence in Greek and Latin Literature (2022) 22
seneca (the younger) Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 69, 71
stoicism Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
stomach Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
therapy, techniques see esp. Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
therapy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235
virgil Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus (2012) 69, 71
wine Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
wise man Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 174
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia)' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 235