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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10243
Seneca The Younger, Letters, 114.4


nanHow Maecenas lived is too well-known for present comment. We know how he walked, how effeminate he was, and how he desired to display himself; also, how unwilling he was that his vices should escape notice. What, then? Does not the looseness of his speech match his ungirt attire?[3] Are his habits, his attendants, his house, his wife,[4] any less clearly marked than his words? He would have been a man of great powers, had he set himself to his task by a straight path, had he not shrunk from making himself understood, had he not been so loose in his style of speech also. You will therefore see that his eloquence was that of an intoxicated man – twisting, turning, unlimited in its slackness.


nanIf one might behold such a face, more exalted and more radiant than the mortal eye is wont to behold, would not one pause as if struck dumb by a visitation from above, and utter a silent prayer, saying: "May it be lawful to have looked upon it!"? And then, led on by the encouraging kindliness of his expression, should we not bow down and worship? Should we not, after much contemplation of a far superior countenance, surpassing those which we are wont to look upon, mild-eyed and yet flashing with life-giving fire – should we not then, I say, in reverence and awe, give utterance to those famous lines of our poet Vergil:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 8.8.20 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Philippicae, 2.18.44 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 2.23.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Livy, History, 34.7.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Amores, 1.5.9-1.5.18, 3.2.31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 3.645 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.645. She runs like a frightened doe that hears the wolves.
7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.382, 3.156, 10.536 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.323 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.323. But the same stormful fortune still pursues
9. Juvenal, Satires, 6.444-6.446 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Martial, Epigrams, 1.49.31-1.49.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Martial, Epigrams, 1.49.31-1.49.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67.4, 120.85-120.86 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 67.4, 120.85-120.86 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Helviam, 10.1, 10.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 18.4, 83.20, 83.25, 114.3, 114.5-114.6, 114.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Seneca The Younger, Thyestes, 46 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Suetonius, Caligula, 52 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Suetonius, Iulius, 45.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Suetonius, Nero, 51 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Tacitus, Annals, 2.59, 13.30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13.30.  In the same consulate, Vipsanius Laenas was found guilty of malversation in his province of Sardinia; Cestius Proculus was acquitted on a charge of extortion brought by the Cretans. Clodius Quirinalis, who, as commandant of the crews stationed at Ravenna, had by his debauchery and ferocity tormented Italy, as though Italy were the most abject of the nations, forestalled his sentence by poison. Caninius Rebilus, who in juristic knowledge and extent of fortune ranked with the greatest, escaped the tortures of age and sickness by letting the blood from his arteries; though, from the unmasculine vices for which he was infamous, he had been thought incapable of the firmness of committing suicide. In contrast, Lucius Volusius departed in the fullness of honour, after enjoying a term of ninety-three years of life, a noble fortune virtuously gained, and the unbroken friendship of a succession of emperors.
21. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 9.1.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.43.4, 59.26.6-59.26.10, 63.13.3, 8079.1.1, 8079.13-8079.17 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

43.43.4.  Sulla had looked askance at the looseness of his girdle, so much so that he had wished to kill him, and declared to those who begged him off: "Well, I will grant him to you; but be thoroughly on your guard against this ill-girt fellow." And Cicero could not comprehend it 59.26.6.  because he had bridged so great an expanse of sea; he also impersonated Hercules, Bacchus, Apollo, and all the other divinities, not merely males but also females, often taking the rôle of Juno, Diana, or Venus. Indeed, to match the change of name he would assume all the rest of the attributes that belonged to the various gods, so that he might seem really to resemble them. 59.26.7.  Now he would be seen as a woman, holding a wine-bowl and (Opens in another window)')" onMouseOut="nd();" thyrsus, and again he would appear as a man equipped with a club and lion's skin or perhaps a helmet and shield. He would be seen at one time with a smooth chin and later with a full beard. Sometimes he wielded a trident and again he brandished a thunderbolt. Now he would impersonate a maiden equipped for hunting or for war, and a little later would play the married woman. 59.26.8.  Thus by varying the style of his dress, and by the use of accessories and wigs, he achieved accuracy inasmuch diverse parts; and he was eager to appear to be anything rather than a human being and an emperor. Once a Gaul, seeing him uttering oracles from a lofty platform in the guise of Jupiter, was moved to laughter 59.26.9.  whereupon Gaius summoned him and inquired, "What do I seem to you to be?" And the other answered (I give his exact words):"A big humbug." Yet the man met with no harm, for he was only a shoemaker. Thus it is, apparently, that persons of such rank as Gaius can bear the frankness of the common herd more easily than that of those who hold high position. 59.26.10.  The attire, now, that I have described was what he would assume whenever he pretended to be a god; and suitable supplications, prayers, and sacrifices would then be offered to him. At other times he usually appeared in public in silk or in triumphal dress.
23. Epigraphy, Ae, 1972.174



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ambition Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
anger Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
antonius, marcus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
apicius, gaius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
appearance Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
ariadne Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
banquets Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175, 180
banquets (convivia) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
barbarians Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
caesar, c. iulius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 181
caesar, julius (see julius caesar) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
caligula, c. iulius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
caligula Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
caligula (roman emperor) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
caracalla Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
cassius dio Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
chiton (cingillum (belt) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
claudius, t. caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
clothing Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180, 181
commodus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
corinna Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
crepidae Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
cultus Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
decline Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 181
diana (artemis) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
downfall Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
dress, female Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dress, imperial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dress, masculine Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dress, matrons (veste maritali) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dress, patrician Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dress, public ceremonial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dress, slaves Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dress Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
dyes Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
dynasty Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
effeminacy Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
elagabalus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
epicurean doctrine Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
eyes (as a signpost for character) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
footwear Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
gender Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
girdle Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
greediness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
habitus Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
happiness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
homosexuality Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
hunting Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
identity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
impotentia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
ingenium Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
insolence (ὕβρις) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
julia maesa Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
julia mamaea Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
julius caesar, c. Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
julius caesar Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
juvenal Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
lascivia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
lunulae (crescent-shaped shoe buckles) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
lust vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
macrinus (opellius) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
maecenas, c. clinius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175, 180, 181
martial Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
matrons Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
naming Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
nausea Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175, 181
nero Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
nero claudius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175, 181
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496
pallium Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
parallelism (narrative) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
pattern(ing) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
paupertas Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
perversion Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
physiognomy Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
pleasure Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175, 180, 181
pliny, the elder Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
poverty vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175
purple Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
purpura Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
religion Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
satire Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
severus alexander Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
sexuality Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
shoes Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
sobrietas Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
social control Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
soldiers Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
soleae Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
spain Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
statues Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
stola Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
stomach Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 175, 180
suetonius Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
synthesis, synthesina Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
theatrical(ity) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
toga, muliebris Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
toga, praetexta Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
toga, virilis Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
toga Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
trimalchio Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 181
tunic, mens Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
tunic, womens Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
tunic Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
tunica, palmata Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
tunica, soluta Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
tunica, talaris Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 45
villae Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 181
wine Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 180
women' Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 244
zona (belt) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 496