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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10243
Seneca The Younger, Letters, 108.12


nanWhen we hear such words as these, we are led towards a confession of the truth. Even men in whose opinion nothing is enough, wonder and applaud when they hear such words, and swear eternal hatred against money. When you see them thus disposed, strike home, keep at them, and charge them with this duty, dropping all double meanings, syllogisms, hair-splitting, and the other side-shows of ineffective smartness. Preach against greed, preach against high living; and when you notice that you have made progress and impressed the minds of your hearers, lay on still harder. You cannot imagine how much progress can be brought about by an address of that nature, when you are bent on curing your hearers and are absolutely devoted to their best interests. For when the mind is young, it may most easily be won over to desire what is honourable and upright; truth, if she can obtain a suitable pleader, will lay strong hands upon those who can still be taught, those who have been but superficially spoiled.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 28, 27 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

27. Those daughters of Lord Zeus proclaimed to me:
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 21, 40-63, 68, 14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. The Greeks celebrate Anaxagoras and Democritus, because they, being smitten with a desire for philosophy, allowed all their estates to be devoured by cattle. I myself admire the men who thus showed themselves superior to the attractions of money; but how much better were those who have not permitted cattle to devour their possessions, but have supplied the necessities of mankind, of their own relations and friends, and have made them rich though they were poor before? For surely that was inconsiderate conduct (that I may avoid saying that any action of men whom Greece has agreed to admire was a piece of insanity); but this is the act of sober men, and one which has been carefully elaborated by exceeding prudence.
3. Seneca The Younger, De Beneficiis, 1.4.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Seneca The Younger, De Consolatione Ad Marciam, 19.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 2.2.3-2.2.6, 2.3.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 7.3, 7.7, 40.5, 56.15, 88.7, 108.7-108.11, 115.12-115.14 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Tacitus, Agricola, 21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.180 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.180. So renowned was he for dialectic that most people thought, if the gods took to dialectic, they would adopt no other system than that of Chrysippus. He had abundance of matter, but in style he was not successful. In industry he surpassed every one, as the list of his writings shows; for there are more than 705 of them. He increased their number by arguing repeatedly on the same subject, setting down anything that occurred to him, making many corrections and citing numerous authorities. So much so that in one of his treatises he copied out nearly the whole of Euripides' Medea, and some one who had taken up the volume, being asked what he was reading, replied, The Medea of Chrysippus.
9. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 4.8 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4.8. 8.This also is a testimony of their continence, that, though they neither exercised themselves in walking or riding, yet they lived free from disease, and were sufficiently strong for the endurance of modern labours. They bore therefore many burdens in the performance of sacred operations, and accomplished many ministrant works, which required more than common strength. But they divided the night into the observation of the celestial bodies, and sometimes devoted a part of it to offices of purification; and they distributed the day into the worship of the Gods, according to which they celebrated them with hymns thrice or four times, viz. in the morning and evening, when the sun is at his meridian altitude, and when he is declining to the west. The rest of their time they devoted to arithmetical and geometrical speculations, always labouring to effect something, and to make some new discovery, and, in short, continually exercising their skill. In winter nights also they were occupied in the same employments, being vigilantly engaged in literary pursuits, as paying no attention to the acquisition of externals, and being liberated from the servitude of that bad master, excessive expense. Hence their unwearied and incessant labour testifies their endurance, but their continence is manifested by their liberation from the desire of external good. To sail from Egypt likewise, [i.e. to quit Egypt,] was considered by them to be one of the most unholy things, in consequence of their being careful to avoid foreign luxury and pursuits; for this appeared to them to be alone lawful to those who were compelled to do so by regal necessities. Indeed, they were very anxious to continue in the observance of the institutes of their country, and those who were found to have violated them, though but in a small degree were expelled [from the college of the priests]. The |119 true method of philosophizing, likewise, was preserved by the prophets, by the hierostolistae 9, and the sacred scribes, and also by the horologi, or calculators of nativities. But the rest of the priests, and of the pastophori 10, curators of temples, and ministers of the Gods, were similarly studious of purity, yet not so accurately, and with such great continence, as the priests of whom we have been speaking. And such are the particulars which are narrated of the Egyptians, by a man who was a lover of truth, and an accurate writer, and who among the Stoics strenuously and solidly philosophized. SPAN


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
ambition Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
anaxagoras Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 239
avaritia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
baias Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
chaeremon the stoic, on the egyptian priests Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 239
chrysippus, eur. medea Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
chrysippus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9, 21
cicero, emotions Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
cicero Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
cupiditas Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
dido Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
domitian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21
epictetus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
euripides, medea Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
fear, and anger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21
fear, and desire Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21
fighting (of vices and virtue) Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
greediness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
juno, aen. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21
nero Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21
panaetius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
poverty vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
rome, and civil war Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21
stoicism, fate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
suicide, and virgil Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
suicide, anger Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21
torture' Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 171
turnus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 9
vespasian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 21