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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10230
Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.12.4
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Cicero, On Duties, 1.97, 2.23-2.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.97. Haec ita intellegi possumus existimare ex eo decoro, quod poetae sequuntur; de quo alio loco plura dici solent. Sed tum servare illud poëtas, quod deceat, dicimus, cum id, quod quaque persona dignum est, et fit et dicitur; ut, si Aeacus aut Minos diceret: óderint, dum métuant, aut: natís sepulchre ipse ést parens, indecorum videretur, quod eos fuisse iustos accepimus; at Atreo dicente plausus excitantur; est enim digna persona oratio. Sed poëtae, quid quemque deceat, ex persona iudicabunt; nobis autem personam imposuit ipsa natura magna cum excellentia praestantiaque animantium reliquarum. 2.23. Omnium autem rerum nec aptius est quicquam ad opes tuendas ac tenendas quam diligi nec alienius quam timeri. Praeclare enim Ennius: Quém metuunt, odérunt; quem quisque ódit, periisse éxpetit. Multorum autem odiis nullas opes posse obsistere, si antea fuit ignotum, nuper est cognitum. Nec vero huius tyranni solum, quem armis oppressa pertulit civitas ac paret cum maxime mortuo, interitus declarat, quantum odium hominum valeat ad pestem, sed reliquorum similes exitus tyrannorum, quorum haud fere quisquam talem interitum effugit; malus enim est custos diuturnitatis metus contraque benivolentia fidelis vel ad perpetuitatem. 2.24. Sed iis, qui vi oppresses imperio coercent, sit sane adhibenda saevitia, ut eris in famulos, si aliter teneri non possunt; qui vero in libera civitate ita se instruunt, ut metuantur, iis nihil potest esse dementius. Quamvis enim sint demersae leges alicuius opibus, quamvis timefacta libertas, emergunt tamen haec aliquando aut iudiciis tacitis aut occultis de honore suffragiis. Acriores autem morsus sunt intermissae libertatis quam retentae. Quod igitur latissime patet neque ad incolumitatem solum, sed etiam ad opes et potentiam valet plurimum, id amplectamur, ut metus absit, caritas retineatur. Ita facillime, quae volemus, et privatis in rebus et in re publica consequemur. Etenim qui se metui volent, a quibus metuentur, eosdem metuant ipsi necesse est. 1.97.  That this is the common acceptation of propriety we may infer from that propriety which poets aim to secure. Concerning that, I have occasion to say more in another connection. Now, we say that the poets observe propriety, when every word or action is in accord with each individual character. For example, if Aeacus or Minos said: "Let them hate, if only they fear," or: "The father is himself his children's tomb," that would seem improper, because we are told that they were just men. But when Atreus speaks those lines, they call forth applause; for the sentiment is in keeping with the character. But it will rest with the poets to decide, according to the individual characters, what is proper for each; but to us Nature herself has assigned a character of surpassing excellence, far superior to that of all other living creatures, and in accordance with that we shall have to decide what propriety requires. 2.23.  But, of all motives, none is better adapted to secure influence and hold it fast than love; nothing is more foreign to that end than fear. For Ennius says admirably: "Whom they fear they hate. And whom one hates, one hopes to see him dead." And we recently discovered, if it was not known before, that no amount of power can withstand the hatred of the many. The death of this tyrant, whose yoke the state endured under the constraint of armed force and whom it still obeys more humbly than ever, though he is dead, illustrates the deadly effects of popular hatred; and the same lesson is taught by the similar fate of all other despots, of whom practically no one has ever escaped such a death. For fear is but a poor safeguard of lasting power; while affection, on the other hand, may be trusted to keep it safe for ever. 2.24.  But those who keep subjects in check by force would of course have to employ severity — masters, for example, toward their servants, when these cannot be held in control in any other way. But those who in a free state deliberately put themselves in a position to be feared are the maddest of the mad. For let the laws be never so much overborne by some one individual's power, let the spirit of freedom be never so intimidated, still sooner or later they assert themselves either through unvoiced public sentiment, or through secret ballots disposing of some high office of state. Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered. Let us, then, embrace this policy, which appeals to every heart and is the strongest support not only of security but also of influence and power — namely, to banish fear and cleave to love. And thus we shall most easily secure success both in private and in public life. Furthermore, those who wish to be feared must inevitably be afraid of those whom they intimidate.
2. Cicero, Philippicae, 1.33-1.34 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.778 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Seneca The Younger, Apocolocyntosis, 6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.18.2, 1.25.1, 2.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.20.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Caligula, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Suetonius, Claudius, 30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Nero, 31 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Suetonius, Tiberius, 59.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Tacitus, Annals, 14.10.1-14.10.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.10.1.  But only with the completion of the crime was its magnitude realized by the Caesar. For the rest of the night, sometimes dumb and motionless, but not rarely starting in terror to his feet with a sort of delirium, he waited for the daylight which he believed would bring his end. Indeed, his first encouragement to hope came from the adulation of the centurions and tribunes, as, at the suggestion of Burrus, they grasped his hand and wished him joy of escaping his unexpected danger and the criminal enterprise of his mother. His friends in turn visited the temples; and, once the example had been given, the Campanian towns in the neighbourhood attested their joy by victims and deputations. By a contrast in hypocrisy, he himself was mournful, repining apparently at his own preservation and full of tears for the death of a parent. But because the features of a landscape change less obligingly than the looks of men, and because there was always obtruded upon his gaze the grim prospect of that sea and those shores, — and there were some who believed that he could hear a trumpet, calling in the hills that rose around, and lamentations at his mother's grave, — he withdrew to Naples and forwarded to the senate a letter, the sum of which was that an assassin with his weapon upon him had been discovered in Agermus, one of the confidential freedmen of Agrippina, and that his mistress, conscious of her guilt, had paid the penalty of meditated murder.
12. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.22-1.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accius atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 49, 50
actor, acting Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
adjudication, adjudicating Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
agrippina the younger, empress Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
allusion Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
anger Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
annals Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
antony Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155, 257
apollonius rhodius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
argos Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
assassination Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50; Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155, 257
audience Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
augustus Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
authority Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
c. iulius caesar Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
c. suetonius tranquillus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
caligula, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
caligula Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155; Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
cato minor Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155
cicero, and seneca Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 49, 50
cicero, tyranny Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 49, 50
cicero Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
claudius Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
clemency Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
clementia Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
death Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
dialogue Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
dio cassius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
drama Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
ethics Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
execution Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155
fate Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155
father Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
fear, and hatred Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 49, 50
fear, as principle of government or ruling device Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 49, 50
fear, lexicon of Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 49, 50
fear Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155
gift Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
julius caesar Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
justice Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
king Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
law Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
m. tullius cicero Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
madness Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
matricide Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
minos Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
moral Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
myth Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155
nero, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
nero Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50; Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155, 257; Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
oratio recta, oratio obliqua Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
pelias, and/as atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 49, 50
pharsalus, battle of, lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
philosophy Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
politics Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155, 257
power Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155; Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
psychology Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
seneca, thy. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
seneca the elder Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
seneca the younger Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
soul Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
speech-acts Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
speech Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
stoic Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 257
suetonius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50; Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
sulla (dictator) Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155
tacitus, p. cornelius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
thyestes Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50; Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155, 257
tiberius, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
tiberius (gracchus) Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155
tribunate, tribunes Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
tribune Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137
tyranny Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 155, 257
virtue' Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 137