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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10227
Seneca The Younger, Apocolocyntosis, 5.1-5.3
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Horace, Odes, 1.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.37. and so many of the people followed him, that he was encouraged to come down from the mountains, and to give battle to Antiochus’s generals, when he beat them, and drove them out of Judea. So he came to the government by this his success, and became the prince of his own people by their own free consent, and then died, leaving the government to Judas, his eldest son. 1.37. But as he was avenging himself on his enemies, there fell upon him another providential calamity; for in the seventh year of his reign, when the war about Actium was at the height, at the beginning of the spring, the earth was shaken, and destroyed an immense number of cattle, with thirty thousand men; but the army received no harm, because it lay in the open air.
2. Ovid, Fasti, 5.35 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5.35. Earth bore the Giants, a fierce brood of savage monsters
3. Vergil, Aeneis, 3.658 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.658. Anchises bade us speedily set sail
4. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 5.12.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.12.19.  But I take Nature for my guide and regard any man whatsoever as fairer to view than a eunuch, nor can I believe that Providence is ever so indifferent to what itself has created as to allow weakness to be an excellence, nor again can I think that the knife can render beautiful that which, if produced in the natural course of birth, would be regarded as a monster. A false resemblance to the female sex may in itself delight lust, if it will, but depravity of morals will never acquire such ascendancy as to succeed in giving real value to that to which it has succeeded in giving a high price.
5. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 5.12.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.12.19.  But I take Nature for my guide and regard any man whatsoever as fairer to view than a eunuch, nor can I believe that Providence is ever so indifferent to what itself has created as to allow weakness to be an excellence, nor again can I think that the knife can render beautiful that which, if produced in the natural course of birth, would be regarded as a monster. A false resemblance to the female sex may in itself delight lust, if it will, but depravity of morals will never acquire such ascendancy as to succeed in giving real value to that to which it has succeeded in giving a high price.
6. Seneca The Younger, Apocolocyntosis, 5.2-5.3, 9.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 50.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Suetonius, Caligula, 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Tacitus, Annals, 13.3, 14.31 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13.3.  On the day of the obsequies, the prince opened his panegyric of Claudius. So long as he rehearsed the antiquity of his family, the consulates and the triumphs of his ancestors, he was taken seriously by himself and by others. Allusions, also, to his literary attainments and to the freedom of his reign from reverses abroad had a favourable hearing. But when the orator addressed himself to his foresight and sagacity, no one could repress a smile; though the speech, as the composition of Seneca, exhibited the degree of polish to be expected from that famous man, whose pleasing talent was so well suited to a contemporary audience. The elderly observers, who make a pastime of comparing old days and new, remarked that Nero was the first master of the empire to stand in need of borrowed eloquence. For the dictator Caesar had rivalled the greatest orators; and Augustus had the ready and fluent diction appropriate to a monarch. Tiberius was, in addition, a master of the art of weighing words — powerful, moreover, in the expression of his views, or, if ambiguous, ambiguous by design. Even Caligula's troubled brain did not affect his power of speech; and, when Claudius had prepared his harangues, elegance was not the quality that was missed. But Nero, even in his childish years, turned his vivacious mind to other interests: he carved, painted, practised singing or driving, and occasionally in a set of verses showed that he had in him the rudiments of culture. 14.31.  The Icenian king Prasutagus, celebrated for his long prosperity, had named the emperor his heir, together with his two daughters; an act of deference which he thought would place his kingdom and household beyond the risk of injury. The result was contrary — so much so that his kingdom was pillaged by centurions, his household by slaves; as though they had been prizes of war. As a beginning, his wife Boudicca was subjected to the lash and his daughters violated: all the chief men of the Icenians were stripped of their family estates, and the relatives of the king were treated as slaves. Impelled by this outrage and the dread of worse to come — for they had now been reduced to the status of a province — they flew to arms, and incited to rebellion the Trinobantes and others, who, not yet broken by servitude, had entered into a secret and treasonable compact to resume their independence. The bitterest animosity was felt against the veterans; who, fresh from their settlement in the colony of Camulodunum, were acting as though they had received a free gift of the entire country, driving the natives from their homes, ejecting them from their lands, — they styled them "captives" and "slaves," — and abetted in their fury by the troops, with their similar mode of life and their hopes of equal indulgence. More than this, the temple raised to the deified Claudius continually met the view, like the citadel of an eternal tyranny; while the priests, chosen for its service, were bound under the pretext of religion to pour out their fortunes like water. Nor did there seem any great difficulty in the demolition of a colony unprotected by fortifications — a point too little regarded by our commanders, whose thoughts had run more on the agreeable than on the useful.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
birth Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
britain Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 53
claudius Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213; Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39, 53
consecratio Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39
debate, space for Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39, 53
deformity Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
deification Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39, 53
drusilla Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39
golden age Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39
herodotus Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 118
humour Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39, 53
identity politics Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 53
imperial cult Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 53
janus Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 53
jupiter Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 53
monster Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
morio Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
nero Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39
saturnalia Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 39
seneca the younger Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 118
slave Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
suetonius Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 118
tiberius Baumann and Liotsakis, Reading History in the Roman Empire (2022) 118
veteran Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213
war' Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 213