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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11624
Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Tyranni Triginta, 8.3
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Varro, On The Latin Language, 6.49 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Ovid, Fasti, 3.260-3.392 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.260. Teach me, nymph, who serves Diana’s lake and grove: 3.261. Nymph, Egeria, wife to Numa, speak of your actions. 3.262. There is a lake in the vale of Aricia, ringed by dense woods 3.263. And sacred to religion from ancient times. 3.264. Here Hippolytus hides, who was torn to piece 3.265. By his horses, and so no horse may enter the grove. 3.266. The long hedge is covered with hanging threads 3.267. And many tablets witness the goddess’s merit. 3.268. often a woman whose prayer is answered, brow wreathed 3.269. With garlands, carries lighted torches from the City. 3.270. One with strong hands and swift feet rules there 3.271. And each is later killed, as he himself killed before. 3.272. A pebble-filled stream flows down with fitful murmurs: 3.273. often I’ve drunk there, but in little draughts. 3.274. Egeria, goddess dear to the Camenae, supplies the water: 3.275. She who was wife and counsellor to Numa. 3.276. The Quirites were too prompt to take up arms 3.281. And citizens were ashamed to fight each other: 3.282. Those who had once been violent were transformed, on seeing 3.291. Can teach you the rites of expiation. But they won’t 3.292. Teach them unless compelled: so catch and bind them.’ 3.293. And she revealed the arts by which they could be caught. 3.294. There was a grove, dark with holm-oaks, below the Aventine 3.295. At sight of which you would say: ‘There’s a god within.’ 3.296. The centre was grassy, and covered with green moss 3.297. And a perennial stream of water trickled from the rock. 3.298. Faunus and Picus used to drink there alone. 3.299. Numa approached and sacrificed a sheep to the spring 3.300. And set out cups filled with fragrant wine. 3.301. Then he hid with his people inside the cave. 3.302. The woodland spirits came to their usual spring 3.303. And quenched their dry throats with draughts of wine. 3.304. Sleep succeeded wine: Numa emerged from the icy cave 3.305. And clasped the sleepers’ hands in tight shackles. 3.306. When sleep vanished, they fought and tried to burst 3.307. Their bonds, which grew tighter the more they struggled. 3.308. Then Numa spoke: ‘Gods of the sacred groves, if you accept 3.309. My thoughts were free of wickedness, forgive my actions: 3.310. And show me how the lightning may be averted.’ 3.311. So Numa: and, shaking his horns, so Faunus replied: 3.312. ‘You seek great things, that it’s not right for you to know 3.313. Through our admission: our powers have their limits. 3.314. We are rural gods who rule in the high mountains: 3.315. Jupiter has control of his own weapons. 3.316. You could never draw him from heaven by yourself 3.317. But you may be able, by making use of our aid.’ 3.318. Faunus spoke these words: Picus too agreed 3.319. ‘But remove our shackles,’ Picus added: 3.320. ‘Jupiter will arrive here, drawn by powerful art. 3.321. Cloudy Styx will be witness to my promise.’ 3.322. It’s wrong for men to know what the gods enacted when loosed 3.323. From the snare, or what spells they spoke, or by what art 3.324. They drew Jupiter from his realm above. My song will sing 3.325. of lawful things, such as a poet may speak with pious lips. 3.326. The drew you (eliciunt) from the sky, Jupiter, and later 3.327. Generations now worship you, by the name of Elicius. 3.328. It’s true that the crowns of the Aventine woods trembled 3.329. And the earth sank under the weight of Jove. 3.330. The king’s heart shook, the blood fled from his body 3.331. And the bristling hair stood up stiffly on his head. 3.332. When he regained his senses, he said: ‘King and father 3.333. To the high gods, if I have touched your offering 3.334. With pure hands, and if a pious tongue, too, asks for 3.335. What I seek, grant expiation from your lightning,’ 3.336. The god accepted his prayer, but hid the truth with deep 3.337. Ambiguities, and terrified him with confusing words. 3.338. ‘Sever a head,’ said the god: the king replied; ‘I will 3.339. We’ll sever an onion’s, dug from my garden.’ 3.340. The god added: ‘of a man’: ‘You’ll have the hair,’ 3.341. Said the king. He demanded a life, Numa replied: ‘A fish’s’. 3.342. The god laughed and said: ‘Expiate my lightning like this 3.343. O man who cannot be stopped from speaking with gods. 3.344. And when Apollo’s disc is full tomorrow 3.345. I’ll give you sure pledges of empire.’ 3.346. He spoke, and was carried above the quaking sky 3.362. The king stood, his head covered with a white cloth 3.391. Ancient work, and now call out ‘Mamurius’.
3. Martial, Epigrams, 8.5556.21-8.5556.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Martial, Epigrams, 8.5556.21-8.5556.24 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Numa Pompilius, 13.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

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Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aurelius Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
callimachus,flavian reception of Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
callimachus,telchines in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
callimachus,λεπτότης in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
cestos Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
domitius marsus Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
furius Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
mamurianus Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
martial,and catullus Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
martial,and statius Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
martial,influence of callimachus on Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
martial,window allusions in Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
numa Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369; Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369
veturius mamurius' Augoustakis (2014), Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past, 369
veturius mamurius Verhagen (2022), Security and Credit in Roman Law: The Historical Evolution of Pignus and Hypotheca, 369