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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11510
Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Macrinus, 7.5
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 7978.16.2, 7978.19.1, 7978.28.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 5.2.1, 5.3.10, 5.7.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3. Babylonian Talmud, Avodah Zarah, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

10a. שית שנין יתירתא סבור רבנן קמיה דרב' למימר האי שטר מאוחר הוא ניעכביה עד דמטיא זמניה ולא טריף אמר רב נחמן האי ספרא דוקנא כתביה והנך שית שנין דמלכו בעילם דאנן לא חשבינן להו הוא קחשיב ליה ובזמניה כתביה,דתניא ר' יוסי אומר שש שנים מלכו בעילם ואח"כ פשטה מלכותן בכל העולם כולו:,מתקיף לה רב אחא בר יעקב ממאי דלמלכות יונים מנינן דלמא ליציאת מצרים מנינן ושבקיה לאלפא קמא ונקטיה אלפא בתרא והאי מאוחר הוא אמר רב נחמן בגולה אין מונין אלא למלכי יונים בלבד,הוא סבר דחויי קא מדחי ליה נפק דק ואשכח דתניא בגולה אין מונין אלא למלכי יונים בלבד,אמר רבינא מתניתין נמי דיקא דתנן באחד בניסן ר"ה למלכים ולרגלים ואמרינן למלכים למאי הלכתא אמר רב חסדא לשטרות,ותנן באחד בתשרי ר"ה לשנים ולשמיטין ואמרינן לשנים למאי הלכתא ואמר רב חסדא לשטרות קשיא שטרות אהדדי,ומשנינן כאן למלכי ישראל כאן למלכי עובדי כוכבים למלכי עובדי כוכבים מתשרי מנינן למלכי ישראל מניסן מנינן,ואנן השתא מתשרי מנינן ואי ס"ד ליציאת מצרים מנינן מניסן בעינן למימני אלא לאו ש"מ למלכי יונים מנינן ש"מ:,ויום גינוסיא של מלכיהם וכו': מאי ויום גינוסיא של מלכיהם אמר רב יהודה יום שמעמידין בו עובדי כוכבים את מלכם והתניא יום גינוסיא ויום שמעמידין בו את מלכם לא קשיא הא דידיה הא דבריה,ומי מוקמי מלכא בר מלכא והתני רב יוסף (עובדיה א, ב) הנה קטן נתתיך בגוים שאין מושיבין מלך בן מלך (עובדיה א, ב) בזוי אתה מאד שאין להן לא כתב ולא לשון אלא מאי יום גינוסיא יום הלידה,והתניא יום גינוסיא ויום הלידה לא קשיא הא דידיה הא דבריה,והתניא יום גינוסיא שלו יום גינוסיא של בנו ויום הלידה שלו ויום הלידה של בנו אלא מאי יום גינוסיא יום שמעמידין בו מלכם ולא קשיא הא דידיה הא דבריה,ואי קשיא לך דלא מוקמי מלכא בר מלכא ע"י שאלה מוקמי כגון אסוירוס בר אנטונינוס דמלך,א"ל אנטונינוס לרבי בעינא דימלוך אסוירוס ברי תחותי ותתעביד טבריא קלניא ואי אימא להו חדא עבדי תרי לא עבדי אייתי גברא ארכביה אחבריה ויהב ליה יונה לעילאי בידיה וא"ל לתתאה אימר לעילא דלמפרח מן ידיה יונה אמר שמע מינה הכי קאמר לי את בעי מינייהו דאסוירוס ברי ימלוך תחותי ואימא ליה לאסוירוס דתעביד טבריא קלניא,א"ל מצערין לי חשובי [רומאי] מעייל ליה לגינא כל יומא עקר ליה פוגלא ממשרא קמיה אמר ש"מ הכי קאמר לי את קטול חד חד מינייהו ולא תתגרה בהו בכולהו 10a. a date that had bsix additional yearsrelative to the correct scribal date, which takes for its starting point the beginning of Greek rule. bThe Sageswho studied bbefore Rabba thought to say: This is a postdatedpromissory bnote,which can be used only from the date it specifies. Therefore, blet us hold it until its time arrivesso that the creditor bwill not repossessproperty that the debtor sold prior to the date that appears in the note. bRav Naḥmandisagreed and bsaid: Thispromissory note bwas written by an exacting scribe, and those six yearsare referring to the years bwhenthe Greeks bruledonly bin Elam. We do not count them,as Greek rule had not yet spread throughout the world, but bhe does count them. Andtherefore bhe wrote inthe promissory note the correct btime,as the date does in fact match the year in which the promissory note was written.,Rav Naḥman cites a proof for his resolution: bAs it is taughtin a ibaraitathat bRabbi Yosei says:The Greeks bruled for six years in Elamalone, band afterward their dominion spread throughout the entire world.It is the later event that serves as the basis for the dating system used by most scribes., bRav Aḥa bar Ya’akov objects toRav Naḥman’s answer: bFrom whereis it known bthat we countyears according btothe bGreek rule,and that this promissory note was dated according to a system that uses the Greek rule as a starting point and was written by an exacting scribe? bPerhaps we countthe years using bthe exodus from Egyptas the starting point, which occurred one thousand years before the start of the Greek rule, bandin this case the scribe bleftout bthe first thousand yearsfrom the time of the exodus band held ononly bto the last thousand years,omitting the thousands digit and writing merely the hundreds, tens, and single digits. bAndif so, bthispromissory note bis postdated. Rav Naḥman saidin response: The practice is that bin the exile we countyears bonlyaccording bto the Greek kings. /b,Upon hearing this reply, Rav Aḥa bar Ya’akov bthought:Rav Naḥman bismerely bdeflectingmy legitimate questions with this answer. Afterward, bhe went out, examinedthe matter, band discoveredthat it was as Rav Naḥman said. bAs it is taughtin a ibaraita /i: bIn the exile we countyears bonlyaccording bto the Greek kings. /b, bRavina said: The mishna is also preciselyformulated, as it teaches that we calculate years according to the Greek kings. bAs we learnedin a mishna ( iRosh HaShana2a): bOn the first of Nisan is the New Year for kings and for the Festivals. And we sayabout this: bWith regard to what ihalakha /iis it stated that the first of Nisan is the New Year bfor kings? Rav Ḥisda said:It is said bwith regard todating bdocumentsand determining their validity., bAnd we learnedin the same mishna: bOn the first of Tishrei is the New Year forcounting byears and forcalculating bSabbaticalcycles. bAnd we say: With regard to what ihalakha /iis it stated that the first of Tishrei is the New Year bforcounting byears? And Rav Ḥisda said:It is said bwith regard todating bdocuments.These two statements with regard to the dating of bdocumentsare bdifficultin light of beach other,as according to one statement the dating system is based on Nisan as the first month, whereas according to the other the year begins in Tishrei., bAnd we resolvedthe contradiction by explaining that bherethe dating is according bto kings of Israel,and btherethe dating is according bto the kings of thegentile bnations of the world.That is, when we date years according bto the kings of the nations of the world, we count fromthe month of bTishrei,whereas when we date years according bto the kings of Israel, we count fromthe month of bNisan. /b,Ravina explains his proof: bAnd nowthat bwe count fromthe month of bTishreiwhen dating documents, one can claim as follows: bIf it enters your mindthat bwe countand date years using bthe exodus from Egyptas the starting point, while leaving off the first thousand years, then bwe should count fromthe month of bNisan,when the exodus occurred. bRather, isn’t itcorrect to bconclude fromthe mishna that bwe countyears according bto the Greek kings?The Gemara affirms: bConclude from itthat the scribal years are in fact calculated according to the Greek kings. Therefore, one should explain as did Rav Naḥman: A promissory note that appears to be postdated by six years may not actually be a postdated promissory note; rather, it is assumed to have been written by an exacting scribe.,§ One of the gentile festivals listed in the mishna is bthe day of the festival [ igeinuseya /i] of their kings.The Gemara asks: bWhat ismeant by: bThe day of igeinuseyaof their kings? Rav Yehuda says:This is referring to the bday on which the gentiles appointand crown btheir king.The Gemara asks: bBut isn’t it taughtin a ibaraita /i: Two gentile festivals are bthe day of igeinuseyaandthe bday on which the gentiles appoint their king?This indicates that these are two separate occasions. The Gemara answers that it is bnot difficult: This,the day of igeinuseya /i, is referring to the coronation of the king bhimself,whereas bthat,the day on which the gentiles appoint and crown their king, is referring to the coronation bof his son,when a son is crowned during his father’s lifetime.,The Gemara asks: bAnd dothe Romans actually bappointas bking the son of the king? But didn’t Rav Yosef teach:The verse relating a prophesy about Edom, associated with the Roman Empire: b“Behold, I made you small among the nations”(Obadiah 1:2), is a reference to the fact bthatthe Romans bdo not placeon the throne as bking the son of the king.The continuation of the verse: b“You are greatly despised,”is a reference to the fact bthatthe Romans bhave neithertheir own bscript northeir own blanguage,but use those of other nations. The Gemara therefore rejects the explanation of the ibaraitathat distinguishes between coronation of a king and coronation of the king’s son: bRather, what is the day of igeinuseya /i?It is btheking’s bbirthday. /b,The Gemara asks: bBut isn’t it taughtin a ibaraita /i: Two gentile festivals are bthe day of igeinuseyaand the birthday.Once again, these two events cannot be the same. The Gemara answers: It is bnot difficult: This,the day of igeinuseya /i, is referring to the birthday of the king bhimself,whereas bthat,the birthday mentioned in the ibaraita /i, is referring to the birthday bof his son. /b,The Gemara further asks: bBut isn’t it taughtin a ibaraita /i: bThe day of igeinuseyaofthe king, bthe day of igeinuseyaof his son, andthe king’s bbirthday and the birthday of his son?If so, the igeinuseyacannot be either his or his son’s birthday. bRather, whatis meant by the bday of igeinuseya /i?In fact it is referring to the bday on whichthe gentiles bappointand crown btheir king. Andthe fact that a ibaraitamentions both the day of igeinuseyaand the day on which the gentiles appoint and crown their king is bnot difficult,as bthis,the day of igeinuseya /i, is referring to bhisown coronation, whereas bthat,the day on which the gentiles appoint and crown their king, is referring to the coronation bof his son. /b, bAnd ifit is bdifficult for you thatwhich was stated earlier, bthatthe Romans bdo not appointas bking the son of the king,in fact bthey do appointa son of the king as king bthrough the requestof the king. bFor example,there was bAsveirus, son of Antoninus, who ruledat the request of Antoninus.,The Gemara provides the background for this assertion. It is related that bAntoninus said to RabbiYehuda HaNasi: bI wish for Asveirus my son to rule instead of me, and thatthe city bTiberias be released[ikelaneya/b] from paying taxes. bAnd if I tellthe Roman senate boneof my wishes, bthey will doas I wish, but if I ask for btwoof them bthey will not doas I wish. Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi conveyed his answer in the following manner: bHe brought a man, placed him onthe shoulders of banotherman, band put a dove in the hands of the one on top. And he said to the one on the bottom: Tell the one on top that he should cause the dove to fly from his hands.Antoninus bsaidto himself: bLearn from itthat bthisis what Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi bis saying to me: Youshould baskthe Senate: bLet Asveirus my son rule instead of me, and say to Asveirus that he should release Tiberiasfrom paying taxes.,Antoninus also bsaid toRabbi Yehuda HaNasi: bImportant Romans are upsetting me;what can I do about them? Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi bbrought him tohis bgarden,and bevery day he uprooted a radish from the garden bed before him.Antoninus bsaidto himself: bLearn from itthat bthisis what Rabbi Yehuda HaNasi bis saying to me: Youshould bkill them oneby bone, and do not incite all of themat once.
4. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Elagabalus, 1.4, 2.4, 3.1-3.2, 16.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

5. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Macrinus, 7.8 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accession (imperial) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
advisers Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
antoninus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
appearance vs. reality Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
aseverus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
caracalla Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104; Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
cassius dio, l. Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
cassius dio Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
commodus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
death Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
deception Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
downfall Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
elagabalus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
emesa Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
herodian Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
imitation (of emperors) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
julia maesa Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
letters Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
macrinus Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
macrinus (opellius) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
marcus aurelius Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
naming Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
parallelism (narrative) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
pattern(ing) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
pertinax Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
propaganda (imperial) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
readers, active engagement/response Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
readers, foreknowledge Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
senate Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
septimius severus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104; Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
severus alexander Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251
speech(es)' Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 104
syria Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 251