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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11515
Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 17.9
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.46 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Livy, History, 39.5.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Ovid, Amores, 3.2.31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Propertius, Elegies, 4.2.3-4.2.4 (1st cent. BCE

5. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.22, 34.34, 35.133, 36.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Caligula, 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Iulius, 13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Suetonius, Nero, 21.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.25.5, 59.26.6-59.26.10, 59.30.1, 7372.15.6, 7372.16.1, 7372.20.2, 7372.22.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.26.6.  because he had bridged so great an expanse of sea; he also impersonated Hercules, Bacchus, Apollo, and all the other divinities, not merely males but also females, often taking the rôle of Juno, Diana, or Venus. Indeed, to match the change of name he would assume all the rest of the attributes that belonged to the various gods, so that he might seem really to resemble them. 59.26.7.  Now he would be seen as a woman, holding a wine-bowl and (Opens in another window)')" onMouseOut="nd();" thyrsus, and again he would appear as a man equipped with a club and lion's skin or perhaps a helmet and shield. He would be seen at one time with a smooth chin and later with a full beard. Sometimes he wielded a trident and again he brandished a thunderbolt. Now he would impersonate a maiden equipped for hunting or for war, and a little later would play the married woman. 59.26.8.  Thus by varying the style of his dress, and by the use of accessories and wigs, he achieved accuracy inasmuch diverse parts; and he was eager to appear to be anything rather than a human being and an emperor. Once a Gaul, seeing him uttering oracles from a lofty platform in the guise of Jupiter, was moved to laughter 59.26.9.  whereupon Gaius summoned him and inquired, "What do I seem to you to be?" And the other answered (I give his exact words):"A big humbug." Yet the man met with no harm, for he was only a shoemaker. Thus it is, apparently, that persons of such rank as Gaius can bear the frankness of the common herd more easily than that of those who hold high position. 59.26.10.  The attire, now, that I have described was what he would assume whenever he pretended to be a god; and suitable supplications, prayers, and sacrifices would then be offered to him. At other times he usually appeared in public in silk or in triumphal dress.
10. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 1.15.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.11.10-5.11.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.11.10. All the floor in front of the image is paved, not with white, but with black tiles. In a circle round the black stone runs a raised rim of Parian marble, to keep in the olive oil that is poured out. For olive oil is beneficial to the image at Olympia, and it is olive oil that keeps the ivory from being harmed by the marshiness of the Altis. On the Athenian Acropolis the ivory of the image they call the Maiden is benefited, not by olive oil, but by water. For the Acropolis, owing to its great height, is over-dry, so that the image, being made of ivory, needs water or dampness. 5.11.11. When I asked at Epidaurus why they pour neither water nor olive oil on the image of Asclepius, the attendants at the sanctuary informed me that both the image of the god and the throne were built over a cistern.
12. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 11.13, 17.8-17.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

13. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 11.13, 17.8, 17.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alban mount Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
ambracia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
auctoritas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
avianius evander, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
claudius marcellus, m., ciceros portrayal of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
claudius marcellus, m., his ovatio Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
claudius marcellus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
commodus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
curius dentatus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
diana Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
dominus et deus, equestrian statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
evocatio Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
falerii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
fulvius flaccus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
fulvius nobilior, m., conquers ambracia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
greek, art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
greek, luxury imports Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
imagines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
julius caesar, c., respects pompeys statues Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
luxury, importation of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
miles, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
nero, colossus of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
objects, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
phidias, athena parthenus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
pyrrhus, war with Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
rapilius serapio, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
rome, capitoline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
rome, temple of mater matuta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
rome, temple of saturn, cult statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
statuary, chryselephantine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
statuary, colossal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
statuary, equestrian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
statuary, gilding of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
statuary, painted Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
statuary, preservation of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
statuary, restoration of' Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
tarentum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
tarquinius priscus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
timotheus, his diana restored Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
volsinii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
vortumnus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 36
zeus, olympian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 298