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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11515
Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 10.9
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Aristophanes, Frogs, 48 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

48. ποῖ γῆς ἀπεδήμεις; ἐπεβάτευον Κλεισθένει-
2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 3.93 (1st cent. CE

3. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.34, 7.75 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Demetrius, 41.5-41.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Greek Questions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Augustus, 43 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Domitianus, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Suetonius, Tiberius, 61 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Tacitus, Annals, 15.34.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Tacitus, Histories, 5.3-5.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.3.  Most authors agree that once during a plague in Egypt which caused bodily disfigurement, King Bocchoris approached the oracle of Ammon and asked for a remedy, whereupon he was told to purge his kingdom and to transport this race into other lands, since it was hateful to the gods. So the Hebrews were searched out and gathered together; then, being abandoned in the desert, while all others lay idle and weeping, one only of the exiles, Moses by name, warned them not to hope for help from gods or men, for they were deserted by both, but to trust to themselves, regarding as a guide sent from heaven the one whose assistance should first give them escape from their present distress. They agreed, and then set out on their journey in utter ignorance, but trusting to chance. Nothing caused them so much distress as scarcity of water, and in fact they had already fallen exhausted over the plain nigh unto death, when a herd of wild asses moved from their pasturage to a rock that was shaded by a grove of trees. Moses followed them, and, conjecturing the truth from the grassy ground, discovered abundant streams of water. This relieved them, and they then marched six days continuously, and on the seventh seized a country, expelling the former inhabitants; there they founded a city and dedicated a temple. 5.4.  To establish his influence over this people for all time, Moses introduced new religious practices, quite opposed to those of all other religions. The Jews regard as profane all that we hold sacred; on the other hand, they permit all that we abhor. They dedicated, in a shrine, a statue of that creature whose guidance enabled them to put an end to their wandering and thirst, sacrificing a ram, apparently in derision of Ammon. They likewise offer the ox, because the Egyptians worship Apis. They abstain from pork, in recollection of a plague, for the scab to which this animal is subject once afflicted them. By frequent fasts even now they bear witness to the long hunger with which they were once distressed, and the unleavened Jewish bread is still employed in memory of the haste with which they seized the grain. They say that they first chose to rest on the seventh day because that day ended their toils; but after a time they were led by the charms of indolence to give over the seventh year as well to inactivity. Others say that this is done in honour of Saturn, whether it be that the primitive elements of their religion were given by the Idaeans, who, according to tradition, were expelled with Saturn and became the founders of the Jewish race, or is due to the fact that, of the seven planets that rule the fortunes of mankind, Saturn moves in the highest orbit and has the greatest potency; and that many of the heavenly bodies traverse their paths and courses in multiples of seven.
11. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 60.5.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

60.5.4.  Besides his moderation in this respect, he further forbade any one to worship him or to offer him any sacrifice; he checked the many excessive acclamations accorded him; and he accepted, at first, only one image, and that a silver one, and two statues, of bronze and marble, that had been voted to him.
12. Lucian, How To Write History, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Minucius Felix, Octavius, 9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

14. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 1.7, 9.6, 10.8-10.9, 17.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

15. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Commodus, 1.7, 9.6, 10.8, 17.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

16. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antiochus, n. Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
apion Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
apollonius molon Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
ass, in popular culture Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
augustus Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
birth Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
commodus Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
deformity Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
dwarf Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
favorinus of arles Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
fool Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
hadrian Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
hermaphrodite Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
humour Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
maccabees, propaganda surrounding Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
monster Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
persian policies Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
polemics Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
shechemites Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523
slave Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
speech impairment' Laes Goodey and Rose, Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies (2013) 222
types of animals sacrificed, worship of an ass Bickerman and Tropper, Studies in Jewish and Christian History (2007) 523