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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10128
Sappho, Fragments, 1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

35 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 122, 177, 19, 5, 114 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 122, 177, 19, 5, 114 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Hesiod, Fragments, 358 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Hesiod, Theogony, 31, 30 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

30. False things that yet seem true, but we know well
5. Homer, Iliad, 6.235-6.236, 14.195-14.196, 14.337, 18.426-18.427 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.235. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 6.236. /seeing he made exchange of armour with Diomedes, son of Tydeus, giving golden for bronze, the worth of an hundred oxen for the worth of nine.But when Hector was come to the Scaean gate and the oak-tree, round about him came running the wives and daughters of the Trojans asking of their sons and brethren and friends 14.195. /speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.196. /speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.337. /Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. 18.426. /an honoured guest and a welcome? Heretofore thou hast not been wont to come. Speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. 18.427. /an honoured guest and a welcome? Heretofore thou hast not been wont to come. Speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment.
6. Homer, Odyssey, 3.98-3.101, 5.89-5.90, 13.42-13.45, 17.239, 18.112-18.113 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

7. Alcaeus, Fragments, 298 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

8. Alcaeus, Fragments, 298 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

9. Sappho, Fragments, 5.3 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

10. Sappho, Fragments, 5.3 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

11. Sappho, Fragments, 5.3 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

12. Semonides of Amorgos, Fragments, 7 (7th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

13. Solon, Fragments, 13 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

14. Anacreon, Fragments, 357, 347 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Anacreon, Fragments, 357, 347 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Theognis, Elegies, 20-24, 19 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Alcaeus Comicus, Fragments, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Alcaeus Comicus, Fragments, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Euripides, Alcestis, 917-919, 916 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. Euripides, Andromache, 1218 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Euripides, Hecuba, 832 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

832. φίλτρων μεγίστη γίγνεται βροτοῖς χάρις.
22. Euripides, Helen, 640-641, 724-725, 639 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

23. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 345 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

345. the custom in marriage for a happy mother; Ismenus had no part at your wedding in supplying the luxurious bath, and there was silence through the streets of Thebes , at the entrance of your bride.
24. Euripides, Trojan Women, 1170 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1170. then were you blessed, if anything here is blessed. But now after one glimpse, one dream of them, you know them no more, my child, and have no joy of them, though heir to all. Ah, poor child! how sadly have your own father’s walls, those towers that Loxias reared, shorn from your head
25. Herodotus, Histories, 2.135, 5.95, 6.105 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.135. Rhodopis came to Egypt to work, brought by Xanthes of Samos, but upon her arrival was freed for a lot of money by Kharaxus of Mytilene, son of Scamandronymus and brother of Sappho the poetess. ,Thus Rhodopis lived as a free woman in Egypt, where, as she was very alluring, she acquired a lot of money—sufficient for such a Rhodopis, so to speak, but not for such a pyramid. ,Seeing that to this day anyone who likes can calculate what one tenth of her worth was, she cannot be credited with great wealth. For Rhodopis desired to leave a memorial of herself in Greece, by having something made which no one else had thought of or dedicated in a temple and presenting this at Delphi to preserve her memory; ,so she spent one tenth of her substance on the manufacture of a great number of iron beef spits, as many as the tenth would pay for, and sent them to Delphi ; these lie in a heap to this day, behind the altar set up by the Chians and in front of the shrine itself. ,The courtesans of Naucratis seem to be peculiarly alluring, for the woman of whom this story is told became so famous that every Greek knew the name of Rhodopis, and later on a certain Archidice was the theme of song throughout Greece, although less celebrated than the other. ,Kharaxus, after giving Rhodopis her freedom, returned to Mytilene . He is bitterly attacked by Sappho in one of her poems. This is enough about Rhodopis. 5.95. Among the various incidents of this war, one in particular is worth mention; In the course of a battle in which the Athenians had the upper hand, Alcaeus the poet took to flight and escaped, but his armor was taken by the Athenians and hung up in the temple of Athena at Sigeum. ,Alcaeus wrote a poem about this and sent it to Mytilene. In it he relates his own misfortune to his friend Melanippus. As for the Mytilenaeans and Athenians, however, peace was made between them by Periander son of Cypselus, to whose arbitration they committed the matter, and the terms of peace were that each party should keep what it had. 6.105. While still in the city, the generals first sent to Sparta the herald Philippides, an Athenian and a long-distance runner who made that his calling. As Philippides himself said when he brought the message to the Athenians, when he was in the Parthenian mountain above Tegea he encountered Pan. ,Pan called out Philippides' name and bade him ask the Athenians why they paid him no attention, though he was of goodwill to the Athenians, had often been of service to them, and would be in the future. ,The Athenians believed that these things were true, and when they became prosperous they established a sacred precinct of Pan beneath the Acropolis. Ever since that message they propitiate him with annual sacrifices and a torch-race.
26. Dinarchus, Or., 1.23 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

27. Menander, Epitrepontes, 478-479, 477 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

28. Theocritus, Idylls, 18.16-18.18, 18.28, 18.31 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

29. Catullus, Poems, 51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

30. Ovid, Amores, 2.13.8-2.13.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 9.666-9.797 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

32. Vergil, Aeneis, 12.821 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.821. her rose-red cheek and hyacinthine hair.
33. Longinus, On The Sublime, 10.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

34. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 3.11.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. Stesichorus, Fragments, 192



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
isis in ovids metamorphoses Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 50
isis in ovids metamorphoses , inscription dedicated by telethusa to Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 50
isis in ovids metamorphoses , ritual and poetry, link between Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 50
poetry and ritual, link between Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 50
ritual and poetry, link between Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 50
womens rituals and agency in roman literature, poetry and ritual, link between' Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 50