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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10009
Quintilian, Institutes Of Oratory, 9.2.8


nan How much greater is the fire of his words as they stand than if he had said, "You have abused our patience a long time," and "Your plots are all laid bare." We may also ask what cannot be denied, as "Was Gaius Ficiulanius Falcula, I ask you, brought to justice?" Or we may put a question to which it is difficult to reply, as in the common forms, "How is it possible?" "How can that be?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Lysias, Orations, 30.10, 30.13, 30.21-30.23 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Lucullus, 144 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Horace, Sermones, 1.4.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.445-7.462 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.445. Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb
5. Juvenal, Satires, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 9.2.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.2.15.  A different form of fictitious question is to be found in the pro Caelio. "Some one will say, 'Is this your moral discipline? Is this the training you would give young men?' " with the whole passage that follows. Then comes his reply, "Gentlemen, if there were any man with such vigour of mind, with such innate virtue and self-control, etc." A different method is to ask a question and not to wait for a reply, but to subjoin the reply at once yourself. For example, "Had you no house? Yes, you had one. Had you money and to spare? No, you were in actual want." This is a figure which some call suggestion.
7. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 3.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Statius, Thebais, 6.41-6.44 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Tacitus, Annals, 2.37-2.38, 3.16, 16.10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.37.  In addition, he gave monetary help to several senators; so that it was the more surprising when he treated the application of the young noble, Marcus Hortalus, with a superciliousness uncalled for in view of his clearly straitened circumstances. He was a grandson of the orator Hortensius; and the late Augustus, by the grant of a million sesterces, had induced him to marry and raise a family, in order to save his famous house from extinction. With his four sons, then, standing before the threshold of the Curia, he awaited his turn to speak; then, directing his gaze now to the portrait of Hortensius among the orators (the senate was meeting in the Palace), now to that of Augustus, he opened in the following manner:— "Conscript Fathers, these children whose number and tender age you see for yourselves, became mine not from any wish of my own, but because the emperor so advised, and because, at the same time, my ancestors had earned the right to a posterity. For to me, who in this changed world had been able to inherit nothing and acquire nothing, — not money, nor popularity, nor eloquence, that general birthright of our house, — to me it seemed enough if my slender means were neither a disgrace to myself nor a burden to my neighbour. At the command of the sovereign, I took a wife; and here you behold the stock of so many consuls, the offspring of so many dictators! I say it, not to awaken odium, but to woo compassion. Some day, Caesar, under your happy sway, they will wear whatever honours you have chosen to bestow: in the meantime, rescue from beggary the great-grandsons of Quintus Hortensius, the fosterlings of the deified Augustus! 2.38.  The senate's inclination to agree incited Tiberius to a more instant opposition. His speech in effect ran thus:— "If all the poor of the earth begin coming here and soliciting money for their children, we shall never satisfy individuals, but we shall exhaust the state. And certainly, if our predecessors ruled that a member, in his turn to speak, might occasionally go beyond the terms of the motion and bring forward a point in the public interest, it was not in order that we should sit here to promote our private concerns and personal fortunes, while rendering the position of the senate and its head equally invidious whether they bestow or withhold their bounty. For this is no petition, but a demand — an unseasonable and unexpected demand, when a member rises in a session convened for other purposes, puts pressure on the kindly feeling of the senate by a catalogue of the ages and number of his children, brings the same compulsion to bear indirectly upon myself, and, so to say, carries the Treasury by storm though, if we drain it by favouritism, we shall have to refill it by crime. The deified Augustus gave you money, Hortalus; but not under pressure, nor with a proviso that it should be given always. Otherwise, if a man is to have nothing to hope or fear from himself, industry will languish, indolence thrive, and we shall have the whole population waiting, without a care in the world, for outside relief, incompetent to help itself, and an incubus to us." These sentences and the like, though heard with approval by the habitual eulogists of all imperial actions honourable or dishonourable, were by most received with silence or a suppressed murmur. Tiberius felt the chill, and, after a short pause, observed that Hortalus had had his answer; but, if the senate thought it proper, he would present each of his male children with two hundred thousand sesterces. Others expressed their thanks; Hortalus held his peace: either his nerve failed him, or even in these straits of fortune he clung to the traditions of his race. Nor in the future did Tiberius repeat his charity, though the Hortensian house kept sinking deeper into ignominious poverty. 3.16.  I remember hearing my elders speak of a document seen more than once in Piso's hands. The purport he himself never disclosed, but his friends always asserted that it contained a letter from Tiberius with his instructions in reference to Germanicus; and that, if he had not been tricked by the empty promises of Sejanus, he was resolved to produce it before the senate and to put the emperor upon his defence. His death, they believed, was not self-inflicted: an assassin had been let loose to do the work. I should hesitate to endorse either theory: at the same time, it was my duty not to suppress a version given by contemporaries who were still living in my early years. With his lineaments composed to melancholy, the Caesar expressed to his regret to the senate that Piso should have chosen a form of death reflecting upon his sovereign . . . and cross-examined him at length on the manner in which his father had spent his last day and night. Though there were one or two indiscretions, the answers were in general adroit enough, and he now read a note drawn up by Piso in nearly the following words:— "Broken by a confederacy of my enemies and the hatred inspired by their lying accusation, since the world has no room for my truth and innocence, I declare before Heaven, Caesar, that I have lived your loyal subject and your mother's no less dutiful servant. I beg you both to protect the interests of my children. Gnaeus has no connexion with my affairs, good or ill, since he spent the whole period in the capital; while Marcus advised me against returning to Syria. And I can only wish that I had given way to my youthful son, rather than he to his aged father! I pray, therefore, with added earnestness that the punishment of my perversity may not fall on his guiltless head. By my five-and-forty years of obedience, by the consulate we held in common, as the man who once earned the confidence of your father, the deified Augustus, as the friend who will never ask favour more, I appeal for the life of my unfortunate son." of Plancina not a word. 16.10.  With not less courage Lucius Vetus, his mother-in‑law Sextia, and his daughter Pollitta, met their doom: they were loathed by the emperor, who took their life to be a standing protest against the slaying of Rubellius Plautus, the son-in‑law of Vetus. But the opportunity for laying bare his ferocity was supplied by the freedman Fortunatus; who, after embezzling his patron's property, now deserted him to turn accuser, and called to his aid Claudius Demianus, imprisoned for heinous offences by Vetus in his proconsulate of Asia, but now freed by Nero as the recompense of delation. Apprized of this, and gathering that he and his freedman were to meet in the struggle as equals, the accused left for his estate at Formiae. There he was placed under a tacit surveillance by the military. He had with him his daughter, who apart from the impending danger, was embittered by a grief which had lasted since the day when she watched the assassins of her husband Plautus — she had clasped the bleeding neck, and still treasured her blood-flecked robe, widowed, unkempt, unconsoled, and fasting except for a little sustece to keep death at bay. Now, at the prompting of her father, she went to Naples; and, debarred from access to Nero, besieged his doors, crying to him to give ear to the guiltless and not surrender to a freedman the one-time partner of his consulate; sometimes with female lamentations, and again in threatening accents which went beyond her sex, until the sovereign showed himself inflexible alike to prayer and to reproach.
10. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.13.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.13.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Papyri, Papyri Demoticae Magicae, 14.6-14.7



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
anger, as “firstâ€\x9d emotion Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
anger, symptoms of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
anger Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
anger (orgē) Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
aristotle Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
athens Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
boeotians Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
boulē Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
citizen, status of Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
cleophon Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
communication Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
contempt Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
contio, as site of invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
damages Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
demetrius Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
democracy Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
emotion, infection with Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
emotions Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
epic, anger in Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
fire imagery Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
flagitatio, and invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
group Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
invidia, and contiones Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, and flagitatio Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, and pudor Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, and seeing Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, and shame Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, and shaming rituals Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, aroused through physical display Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, aroused through suicide Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, righteous Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, role of justice in Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia, scripts of Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
longinus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
lucilius, and anger Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
lysias Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 40
nicomachus Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
physical display, arousing invidia, through Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
pudor, and invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
pudor, role of seeing in Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
quintilian Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
rhetorical questions Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
rituals, shaming, and invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
scorn, as lexical item, and fastidium, of invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
seeing, and invidia, role of, in pudor Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
seeing, and invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
shame, and invidia Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96
spartans Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 106
suicide, arousing invidia through' Kaster, Emotion, Restraint, and Community in Ancient Rome (2005) 96