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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10009
Quintilian, Institutes Of Oratory, 4.1.77


nan There is indeed a pedantic and childish affectation in vogue in the schools of marking the transition by some epigram and seeking to win applause by this feat of legerdemain. Ovid is given to this form of affectation in his Metamorphoses, but there is some excuse for him owing to the fact that he is compelled to weld together subjects of the most diverse nature so as to form a continuous whole.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Cicero, Letters, 2.1.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Letters, 2.1.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Letters, 2.1.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Letters, 2.1.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 2.1.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. New Testament, 1 Timothy, 3.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.16. Without controversy, the mystery of godliness is great: God was revealed in the flesh, Justified in the spirit, Seen by angels, Preached among the nations, Believed on in the world, And received up in glory.
7. New Testament, Colossians, 1.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.15. who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation.
8. New Testament, Hebrews, 1.1-1.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. God, having in the past spoken to the fathers through the prophets at many times and in various ways 1.2. has at the end of these days spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, through whom also he made the worlds. 1.3. His Son is the radiance of his glory, the very image of his substance, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself made purification for our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; 1.4. having become so much better than the angels, as he has inherited a more excellent name than they have. 1.5. For to which of the angels did he say at any time, "You are my Son, Today have I become your father?"and again, "I will be to him a Father, And he will be to me a Son?
9. New Testament, Philippians, 2.6-2.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.6. who, existing in the form of God, didn't consider it robbery to be equal with God 2.7. but emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men. 2.8. And being found in human form, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, yes, the death of the cross. 2.9. Therefore God also highly exalted him, and gave to him the name which is above every name; 2.10. that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, those on earth, and those under the earth 2.11. and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.
10. New Testament, Romans, 10-16, 2-9, 1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 2.5.22, 4.1.70, 4.1.73-4.1.76, 4.1.78-4.1.79, 10.1.88, 10.1.93 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.5.22.  Secondly the opposite extreme must be equally avoided: they must not be permitted to fall victims to the pernicious allurements of the precious blooms produced by our modern euphuists, thus acquiring a passion for the luscious sweetness of such authors, whose charm is all the more attractive to boyish intellects because it is so easy of achievement. 4.1.70.  Still such artifices, although they may be employed at times to good effect, are not to be indulged in indiscriminately, but only when there is strong reason for breaking the rule. The same remark applies to simile (which must however be brief), metaphor and all the tropes, all of which are forbidden by our cautious and pedantic teachers of rhetoric, but which we shall none the less occasionally employ, unless indeed we are to disapprove of the magnificent example of irony in the pro Ligario to which I have already referred a few pages back. 4.1.73.  On the other hand it is at times possible to give the force of an exordium to other portions of the speech. For instance we may ask the judges in the course of our statement of the facts or of our arguments to give us their best attention and good-will, a proceeding which Prodicus recommended as a means of wakening them when they begin to nod. A good example is the following: 4.1.74.  "Gaius Varenus, he who was killed by the slaves of Ancharius — I beg you, gentlemen, to give me your best attention at this point." Further if the case involves a number of different matters, each section must be prefaced with a short introduction, such as "Listen now to what follows," or "I now pass to my next point. 4.1.75.  Even in the proof there are many passages which perform the same function as an exordium, such as the passage in the pro Cluentio where Cicero introduces an attack on the censors and in the pro Murena when he apologises to Servius. But the practice is too common to need illustration. 4.1.76.  However on all occasions when we have employed the exordium, whether we intend to pass to the statement of facts or direct to the proof, our intention should be mentioned at the conclusion of the introduction, with the result that the transition to what follows will be smooth and easy. 4.1.78.  But why necessity is there for an orator to gloss over his transitions or to attempt to deceive the judge, who requires on the contrary to be warned to give his attention to the sequence of the various portions of the speech? For instance the first part of our statement of the facts will be wasted, if the judge does not realise that we have reached that stage. 4.1.79.  Therefore, although we should not be too abrupt in passing to our statement of facts, it is best to do nothing to conceal our transition. Indeed, if the statement of fact on which we are about to embark is somewhat long and complicated, we shall do well to prepare the judge for it, as Cicero often does, most notably in the following passage: "The introduction to my exposition of this point will be rather longer than usual, but I beg you, gentlemen, not to take it ill. For if you get a firm grasp of the beginning, you will find it much easier to follow what comes last." This is practically all that I can find to say on the subject of the exordium.
12. Anon, Anonymous Prolegomena To Plato'S Philosophy, 1.19



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abishag Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 111
apuleius Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
asyndeton Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 111
atticus (ciceros friend) Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
augustine, licentius and Fielding, Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity (2017) 8
augustine Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 109
biography Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
cicero, exordia Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 230
cicero, his oratory as art of illusion Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 230
cicero, pro ligario Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 230
cicero, pro scauro Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 230
cicero Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
corpus, platos Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
corpus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
eleatics Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
exordium, primary exordium Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 214
exordium Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 230; Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 214
god, representations of, creator Rogers, God and the Idols: Representations of God in 1 Corinthians 8-10 (2016) 163
horace Fielding, Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity (2017) 8
hymnos Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 214
isis Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 256
justin Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
menelaus Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 256
metaphor Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 110
natural philosophy Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
nile, river Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 256
olympiodorus of alexandria Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
ovid Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
paul (st.) Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 111
plato Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
pleonasm Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 111
pompeius trogus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
procne Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 256
prooemium Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 214
prudentius Fielding, Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity (2017) 8
pythagoreans Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
quintilian, on the exordium Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 230
quintilian Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 109, 110; Fielding, Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity (2017) 8; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
rhetoric, deliberative rhetoric Rogers, God and the Idols: Representations of God in 1 Corinthians 8-10 (2016) 163
rhetoric Fielding, Transformations of Ovid in Late Antiquity (2017) 8
sexual immorality Rogers, God and the Idols: Representations of God in 1 Corinthians 8-10 (2016) 163
socrates Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
syncrisis, jesus/angels Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 214
system (σύστηµα/συστήµατα), of philosophy, of doctrine / metaphysical Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
title Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
topos Martin and Whitlark, Inventing Hebrews: Design and Purpose in Ancient Rhetoric (2018) 214
typology Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 111
variatio Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 110
vitruvius Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 68
widows Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 110
wisdom' Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 111