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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10009
Quintilian, Institutes Of Oratory, 2.5.22


nan Secondly the opposite extreme must be equally avoided: they must not be permitted to fall victims to the pernicious allurements of the precious blooms produced by our modern euphuists, thus acquiring a passion for the luscious sweetness of such authors, whose charm is all the more attractive to boyish intellects because it is so easy of achievement.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

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1. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 4.1.77-4.1.79, 10.1.39 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.1.77.  There is indeed a pedantic and childish affectation in vogue in the schools of marking the transition by some epigram and seeking to win applause by this feat of legerdemain. Ovid is given to this form of affectation in his Metamorphoses, but there is some excuse for him owing to the fact that he is compelled to weld together subjects of the most diverse nature so as to form a continuous whole. 4.1.78.  But why necessity is there for an orator to gloss over his transitions or to attempt to deceive the judge, who requires on the contrary to be warned to give his attention to the sequence of the various portions of the speech? For instance the first part of our statement of the facts will be wasted, if the judge does not realise that we have reached that stage. 4.1.79.  Therefore, although we should not be too abrupt in passing to our statement of facts, it is best to do nothing to conceal our transition. Indeed, if the statement of fact on which we are about to embark is somewhat long and complicated, we shall do well to prepare the judge for it, as Cicero often does, most notably in the following passage: "The introduction to my exposition of this point will be rather longer than usual, but I beg you, gentlemen, not to take it ill. For if you get a firm grasp of the beginning, you will find it much easier to follow what comes last." This is practically all that I can find to say on the subject of the exordium.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
cicero, his speeches as rhetorical models Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 189
metaphor Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 110
quintilian, ideal of literary education in Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 189
quintilian, on the teaching of rhetoric Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 189
quintilian Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 110
variatio Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 110
vir bonus dicendi peritus Bua, Roman Political Culture: Seven Studies of the Senate and City Councils of Italy from the First to the Sixth Century AD (2019) 189
widows' Cain, Jerome and the Monastic Clergy: A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian (2013) 110