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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9855
Pseudo Clementine Literature, Homilies, 9.9-9.15
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 9.1-9.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

9.1. וַיְבָרֶךְ אֱלֹהִים אֶת־נֹחַ וְאֶת־בָּנָיו וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת־הָאָרֶץ׃ 9.1. וְאֵת כָּל־נֶפֶשׁ הַחַיָּה אֲשֶׁר אִתְּכֶם בָּעוֹף בַּבְּהֵמָה וּבְכָל־חַיַּת הָאָרֶץ אִתְּכֶם מִכֹּל יֹצְאֵי הַתֵּבָה לְכֹל חַיַּת הָאָרֶץ׃ 9.2. וַיָּחֶל נֹחַ אִישׁ הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּטַּע כָּרֶם׃ 9.2. וּמוֹרַאֲכֶם וְחִתְּכֶם יִהְיֶה עַל כָּל־חַיַּת הָאָרֶץ וְעַל כָּל־עוֹף הַשָּׁמָיִם בְּכֹל אֲשֶׁר תִּרְמֹשׂ הָאֲדָמָה וּבְכָל־דְּגֵי הַיָּם בְּיֶדְכֶם נִתָּנוּ׃ 9.3. כָּל־רֶמֶשׂ אֲשֶׁר הוּא־חַי לָכֶם יִהְיֶה לְאָכְלָה כְּיֶרֶק עֵשֶׂב נָתַתִּי לָכֶם אֶת־כֹּל׃ 9.4. אַךְ־בָּשָׂר בְּנַפְשׁוֹ דָמוֹ לֹא תֹאכֵלוּ׃ 9.5. וְאַךְ אֶת־דִּמְכֶם לְנַפְשֹׁתֵיכֶם אֶדְרֹשׁ מִיַּד כָּל־חַיָּה אֶדְרְשֶׁנּוּ וּמִיַּד הָאָדָם מִיַּד אִישׁ אָחִיו אֶדְרֹשׁ אֶת־נֶפֶשׁ הָאָדָם׃ 9.1. And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them: ‘Be fruitful and multiply, and replenish the earth." 9.2. And the fear of you and the dread of you shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air, and upon all wherewith the ground teemeth, and upon all the fishes of the sea: into your hand are they delivered." 9.3. Every moving thing that liveth shall be for food for you; as the green herb have I given you all." 9.4. Only flesh with the life thereof, which is the blood thereof, shall ye not eat." 9.5. And surely your blood of your lives will I require; at the hand of every beast will I require it; and at the hand of man, even at the hand of every man’s brother, will I require the life of man."
2. Anon., Testament of Naphtali, 8.8 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.8. For there is a season for a man to embrace his wife, And a season to abstain therefrom for his prayer.
3. Anon., Didascalia Apostolorum, 24, 23 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

4. Origen, Commentary On Matthew, 11.12 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11.12. And He called to Him the multitude and said to them, Hear and understand, etc. Matthew 15:10 We are clearly taught in these words by the Saviour that, when we read in Leviticus and Deuteronomy the precepts about meat clean and unclean, for the transgression of which we are accused by the material Jews and by the Ebionites who differ little from them, we are not to think that the scope of the Scripture is found in any superficial understanding of them. For if not that which enters into the mouth defiles the man, but that which proceeds out of the mouth, Matthew 15:11 and especially when, according to Mark, the Saviour said these things making all meats clean, Mark 7:19 manifestly we are not defiled when we eat those things which the Jews who desire to be in bondage to the letter of the law declare to be unclean, but we are then defiled when, whereas our lips ought to be bound with perception and we ought to make for them what we call a balance and weight, Sirach 28:25 we speak offhand and discuss matters we ought not, from which there comes to us the spring of sins. And it is indeed becoming to the law of God to forbid those things which arise from wickedness, and to enjoin those things which tend to virtue, but as for things which are in their own nature indifferent to leave them in their own place, as they may, according to our choice and the reason which is in us, be done ill if we sin in them, but if rightly directed by us be done well. And any one who has carefully thought on these matters will see that, even in those things which are thought to be good, it is possible for a man to sin who has taken them up in an evil way and under the impulse of passion, and that these things called impure may be considered pure, if used by us in accordance with reason. As, then, when the Jew sins his circumcision shall be reckoned for uncircumcision, but when one of the Gentiles acts uprightly his uncircumcision shall be reckoned for circumcision, Romans 2:25-26 so those things which are thought to be pure shall be reckoned for impure in the case of him who does not use them fittingly, nor when one ought, nor as far as he ought, nor for what reason he ought. But as for the things which are called impure, All things become pure to the pure, for, To them that are defiled and unbelieving nothing is pure, since both their minds and their conscience are defiled. Titus 1:15 And when these are defiled, they make all things whatsoever they touch defiled; as again on the contrary the pure mind and the pure conscience make all things pure, even though they may seem to be impure; for not from intemperance, nor from love of pleasure, nor with doubting which draws a man both ways, do the righteous use meats or drinks, mindful of the precept, Whether you eat or drink or whatsoever other thing ye do, do all to the glory of God. 1 Corinthians 10:31 And if it be necessary to delineate the foods which are unclean according to the Gospel, we will say that they are such as are supplied by covetousness, and are the result of base love of gain, and are taken up from love of pleasure, and from deifying the belly which is treated with honour, when it, with its appetites, and not reason, rules our souls. But as for us who know that some things are used by demons, or if we do not know, but suspect, and are in doubt about it, if we use such things, we have used them not to the glory of God, nor in the name of Christ; for not only does the suspicion that things have been sacrificed to idols condemn him who eats, but even the doubt concerning this; for he that doubts, according to the Apostle, is condemned if he eat, because he eats not of faith; and whatsoever is not of faith is sin. Romans 14:23 He then eats in faith who believes that that which is eaten has not been sacrificed in the temples of idols, and that it is not strangled nor blood; but he eats not of faith who is in doubt about any of these things. And the man who knowing that they have been sacrificed to demons nevertheless uses them, becomes a communicant with demons, while at the same time, his imagination is polluted with reference to demons participating in the sacrifice. And the Apostle, however, knowing that it is not the nature of meats which is the cause of injury to him who uses them or of advantage to him who refrains from their use, but opinions and the reason which is in them, said, But meat commends us not to God, for neither if we eat are we the better, nor if we eat not are we the worse. 1 Corinthians 8:8 And since he knew that those who have a loftier conception of what things are pure and what impure according to the law, turning aside from the distinction about the use of things pure and impure, and superstition, I think, in respect of things being different, become indifferent to the use of meats, and on this account are condemned by the Jews as transgressors of law, he said therefore, somewhere, Let no man therefore judge you in meat or in drink, etc., Colossians 2:16 teaching us that the things according to the letter are a shadow, but that the true thoughts of the law which are stored up in them are the good things to come, in which one may find what are the pure spiritual meats of the soul, and what are the impure foods in false and contradictory words which injure the man who is nourished in them, For the law had a shadow of the good things to come. Hebrews 10:1
5. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Homilies, 3.24, 8.19, 9.9, 9.11-9.16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

6. Epiphanius, Panarion, 30.16 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

7. Pseudo Clementine Literature, Recognitions, 4.16-4.19 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

4.16. Now that the demons are desirous of occupying the bodies of men, this is the reason. They are spirits having their purpose turned to wickedness. Therefore by immoderate eating and drinking, and lust, they urge men on to sin, but only those who entertain the purpose of sinning, who, while they seem simply desirous of satisfying the necessary cravings of nature, give opportunity to the demons to enter into them, because through excess they do not maintain moderation. For as long as the measure of nature is kept, and legitimate moderation is preserved, the mercy of God does not give them liberty to enter into men. But when either the mind falls into impiety, or the body is filled with immoderate meat or drink, then, as if invited by the will and purpose of those who thus neglect themselves, they receive power as against those who have broken the law imposed by God. 4.17. You see, then, how important is the acknowledgment of God, and the observance of the divine religion, which not only protects those who believe from the assaults of the demon, but also gives them command over those who rule over others. And therefore it is necessary for you, who are of the Gentiles, to betake yourselves to God, and to keep yourselves from all uncleanness, that the demons may be expelled, and God may dwell in you. And at the same time, by prayers, commit yourselves to God, and call for His aid against the impudence of the demons; for 'whatever things ye ask, believing, you shall receive.' Matthew 21:22 But even the demons themselves, in proportion as they see faith grow in a man, in that proportion they depart from him, residing only in that part in which something of infidelity still remains; but from those who believe with full faith, they depart without any delay. For when a soul has come to the faith of God, it obtains the virtue of heavenly water, by which it extinguishes the demon like a spark of fire. 4.18. There is therefore a measure of faith, which, if it be perfect, drives the demon perfectly from the soul; but if it has any defect, something on the part of the demon still remains in the portion of infidelity; and it is the greatest difficulty for the soul to understand when or how, whether fully or less fully, the demon has been expelled from it. For if he remains in any quarter, when he gets an opportunity, he suggests thoughts to men's hearts; and they, not knowing whence they come, believe the suggestions of the demons, as if they were the perceptions of their own souls. Thus they suggest to some to follow pleasure by occasion of bodily necessity; they excuse the passionateness of others by excess of gall; they color over the madness of others by the vehemence of melancholy; and even extenuate the folly of some as the result of abundance of phlegm. But even if this were so, still none of these could be hurtful to the body, except from the excess of meats and drinks; because, when these are taken in excessive quantities, their abundance, which the natural warmth is not sufficient to digest, curdles into a sort of poison, and it, flowing through the bowels and all the veins like a common sewer, renders the motions of the body unhealthy and base. Wherefore moderation is to be attained in all things, that neither may place be given to demons, nor the soul, being possessed by them, be delivered along with them to be tormented in eternal fires. 4.19. There is also another error of the demons, which they suggest to the senses of men, that they should think that those things which they suffer, they suffer from such as are called gods, in order that thereby, offering sacrifices and gifts, as if to propitiate them, they may strengthen the worship of false religion, and avoid us who are interested in their salvation, that they may be freed from error; but this they do, as I have said, not knowing that these things are suggested to them by demons, for fear they should be saved. It is therefore in the power of every one, since man has been made possessed of free-will, whether he shall hear us to life, or the demons to destruction. Also to some, the demons, appearing visibly under various figures, sometimes throw out threats, sometimes promise relief from sufferings, that they may instil into those whom they deceive the opinion of their being gods, and that it may not be known that they are demons. But they are not concealed from us, who know the mysteries of the creation, and for what reason it is permitted to the demons to do those things in the present world; how it is allowed them to transform themselves into what figures they please, and to suggest evil thoughts, and to convey themselves, by means of meats and of drink consecrated to them, into the minds or bodies of those who partake of it, and to concoct vain dreams to further the worship of some idol.
8. Anon., Avot Derabbi Nathan B, 9 (6th cent. CE - 8th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adam Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
alimentary Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187, 191
and demons Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
apocryphal acts McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
blood Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
carrion Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
cosmology Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
demons and baptism Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
demons and food Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
demons and sexual sin Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
demons in jewish-christian texts Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187, 191
demons in second- and third-century texts Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187, 191
dietary laws among jewish-christians Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
eucharist, of bread alone McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
eucharist, of bread and water McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
fasting Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187, 191
food, impurity of and demonology Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
food, impurity of offered to idols Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
health, and purity Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
knowledge Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
leprosy Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
marriage Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
meat, avoidance/prohibition McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
menstruation Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
noah, covenant with McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
pigs Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
polemic with jewish practices Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
prayer Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
ps.-clementine literature on baptism Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
ps.-clementine literature on demons Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187, 191
ps.-clementine literature on dietary purity Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
ps.-clementine literature on sexual purity Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
pseudo-clementines McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
sacrifice, criticism/avoidance of McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
sacrifice Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187, 191
sacrifice to idols/pagan gods Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
sexual relations in second- and third-century christian sources Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
sexual relations proper place, time, and frequency Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191
vegetarianism Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 187
wine, avoidance/prohibition' McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 181
zoroastrian Blidstein, Purity Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature (2017) 191