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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Propertius, Elegies, 4.7-4.8
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14 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 23.62-23.107 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

23.62. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.63. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.64. /lay groaning heavily amid the host of the Myrmidons, in an open space where the waves splashed upon the shore. And when sleep seized him, loosenlng the cares of his heart, being shed in sweetness round about him — for sore weary were his glorious limbs with speeding after Hector unto windy Ilios— 23.65. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.66. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.67. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.68. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.69. /then there came to him the spirit of hapless Patroclus, in all things like his very self, in stature and fair eyes and in voice, and in like raiment was he clad withal; and he stood above Achilles' head and spake to him, saying:Thou sleepest, and hast forgotten me, Achilles. 23.70. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.71. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.72. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.73. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.74. /Not in my life wast thou unmindful of me, but now in my death! Bury me with all speed, that I pass within the gates of Hades. Afar do the spirits keep me aloof, the phantoms of men that have done with toils, neither suffer they me to join myself to them beyond the River, but vainly I wander through the wide-gated house of Hades. 23.75. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.76. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.77. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.78. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.79. /And give me thy hand, I pitifully entreat thee, for never more again shall I come back from out of Hades, when once ye have given me my due of fire. Never more in life shall we sit apart from our dear comrades and take counsel together, but for me hath loathly fate 23.80. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.81. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.82. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.83. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.84. /opened its maw, the fate that was appointed me even from my birth. Aye, and thou thyself also, Achilles like to the gods, art doomed to be brought low beneath the wall of the waelthy Trojans. And another thing will I speak, and charge thee, if so be thou wilt hearken. Lay not my bones apart from thine, Achilles, but let them lie together, even as we were reared in your house 23.85. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.86. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.87. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.88. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.89. /when Menoetius brought me, being yet a little lad, from Opoeis to your country, by reason of grievous man-slaying, on the day when I slew Amphidamus' son in my folly, though I willed it not, in wrath over the dice. Then the knight Peleus received me into his house 23.90. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.91. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.92. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.93. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. 23.94. /and reared me with kindly care and named me thy squire; even so let one coffer enfold our bones, a golden coffer with handles twain, the which thy queenly mother gave thee. Then in answer spake to him Achilles, swift of foot:Wherefore, O head beloved, art thou come hither 23.95. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.96. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.97. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.98. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.99. /and thus givest me charge about each thing? Nay, verily I will fulfill thee all, and will hearken even as thou biddest. But, I pray thee, draw thou nigher; though it be but for a little space let us clasp our arms one about the other, and take our fill of dire lamenting. So saying he reached forth with his hands 23.100. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.101. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.102. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.103. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.104. /yet clasped him not; but the spirit like a vapour was gone beneath the earth, gibbering faintly. And seized with amazement Achilles sprang up, and smote his hands together, and spake a word of wailing:Look you now, even in the house of Hades is the spirit and phantom somewhat, albeit the mind be not anywise therein; 23.105. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.106. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them 23.107. /for the whole night long hath the spirit of hapless Patroclus stood over me, weeping and wailing, and gave me charge concerning each thing, and was wondrously like his very self. So spake he, and in them all aroused the desire of lament, and rosy-fingered Dawn shone forth upon them
2. Euripides, Alcestis, 142-212, 141 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

141. Yea, I did pity thee most truly, Trojan dame, when thou earnest to this house; but from fear of my mistress I hold my peace, albeit I sympathize with thee
3. Horace, Letters, 1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. For some of them apply themselves to this part of learning to show their skill in composition, and that they may therein acquire a reputation for speaking finely. Others of them there are who write histories in order to gratify those that happen to be concerned in them, and on that account have spared no pains, but rather gone beyond their own abilities in the performance. 1.2. neither could the legislator himself have a right mind without such a contemplation; nor would any thing he should write tend to the promotion of virtue in his readers; I mean, unless they be taught first of all, that God is the Father and Lord of all things, and sees all things, and that thence he bestows a happy life upon those that follow him; but plunges such as do not walk in the paths of virtue into inevitable miseries. 1.2. And when God had replied that there was no good man among the Sodomites; for if there were but ten such man among them, he would not punish any of them for their sins, Abraham held his peace. And the angels came to the city of the Sodomites, and Lot entreated them to accept of a lodging with him; for he was a very generous and hospitable man, and one that had learned to imitate the goodness of Abraham. Now when the Sodomites saw the young men to be of beautiful counteces, and this to an extraordinary degree, and that they took up their lodgings with Lot, they resolved themselves to enjoy these beautiful boys by force and violence;
4. Horace, Sermones, 2.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.5. For I also have observed, that many men are very much delighted when they see a man who first began to reproach another, to be himself exposed to contempt on account of the vices he hath himself been guilty of. 2.5. for when these Alexandrians were making war with Cleopatra the queen, and were in danger of being utterly ruined, these Jews brought them to terms of agreement, and freed them from the miseries of a civil war. “But then (says Apion) Onias brought a small army afterward upon the city at the time when Thermus the Roman ambassador was there present.”
5. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.112-1.126 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Amores, 1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Epistulae (Heroides), 3, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Fasti, 3.661-3.674 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.661. And it’s not so far away from the truth. 3.662. The Plebs of old, not yet protected by Tribunes 3.663. Fled, and gathered on the Sacred Mount: 3.664. The food supplies they’d brought with them failed 3.665. Also the stores of bread fit for human consumption. 3.666. There was a certain Anna from suburban Bovillae 3.667. A poor woman, old, but very industrious. 3.668. With her grey hair bound up in a light cap 3.669. She used to make coarse cakes with a trembling hand 3.670. And distribute them, still warm, among the people 3.671. Each morning: this supply of hers pleased them all. 3.672. When peace was made at home, they set up a statue 3.673. To Perenna, because she’d helped supply their needs. 3.674. Now it’s left for me to tell why the girls sing coarse songs:
9. Propertius, Elegies, 1.7, 2.1, 2.14, 2.20, 2.34, 3.4-3.6, 3.12, 3.16, 4.4.16, 4.5-4.6, 4.6.5-4.6.7, 4.6.11-4.6.12, 4.7.83-4.7.86, 4.8 (1st cent. BCE

10. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.384-4.391, 4.615-4.629, 5.334, 7.413-7.472 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.384. all gods, and by his sovran deity 4.385. moves earth and heaven—he it was who bade 4.386. me bear on winged winds his high decree. 4.387. What plan is thine? By what mad hope dost thou 4.388. linger so Iong in lap of Libyan land? 4.389. If the proud reward of thy destined way 4.390. move not thy heart, if all the arduous toil 4.391. to thine own honor speak not, Iook upon 4.615. betwixt the twain the sorrowing sister bore. 4.616. But no words move, no lamentations bring 4.617. persuasion to his soul; decrees of Fate 4.618. oppose, and some wise god obstructs the way 4.619. that finds the hero's ear. oft-times around 4.620. the aged strength of some stupendous oak 4.621. the rival blasts of wintry Alpine winds 4.622. mite with alternate wrath: Ioud is the roar 4.623. and from its rocking top the broken boughs 4.624. are strewn along the ground; but to the crag 4.625. teadfast it ever clings; far as toward heaven 4.626. its giant crest uprears, so deep below 4.627. its roots reach down to Tartarus:—not less 4.628. the hero by unceasing wail and cry 4.629. is smitten sore, and in his mighty heart 5.334. with the green laurel-garland; to the crews 7.413. thy virgin dower, and Bellona's blaze 7.414. light thee the bridal bed! Not only teemed 7.415. the womb of Hecuba with burning brand 7.416. and brought forth nuptial fires; but Venus, too 7.417. uch offspring bore, a second Paris, who 7.419. So saying, with aspect terrible she sped 7.420. earthward her way; and called from gloom of hell 7.421. Alecto, woeful power, from cloudy throne 7.422. among the Furies, where her heart is fed 7.423. with horrid wars, wrath, vengeance, treason foul 7.424. and fatal feuds. Her father Pluto loathes 7.425. the creature he engendered, and with hate 7.426. her hell-born sister-fiends the monster view. 7.427. A host of shapes she wears, and many a front 7.428. of frowning black brows viper-garlanded. 7.429. Juno to her this goading speech addressed: 7.430. “O daughter of dark Night, arouse for me 7.431. thy wonted powers and our task begin! 7.432. Lest now my glory fail, my royal name 7.433. be vanquished, while Aeneas and his crew 7.434. cheat with a wedlock bond the Latin King 7.435. and seize Italia 's fields. Thou canst thrust on 7.436. two Ioving brothers to draw sword and slay 7.437. and ruin homes with hatred, calling in 7.438. the scourge of Furies and avenging fires. 7.439. A thousand names thou bearest, and thy ways 7.440. of ruin multiply a thousand-fold. 7.441. Arouse thy fertile breast! Go, rend in twain 7.442. this plighted peace! Breed calumnies and sow 7.443. causes of battle, till yon warrior hosts 7.445. Straightway Alecto, through whose body flows 7.446. the Gorgon poison, took her viewless way 7.447. to Latium and the lofty walls and towers 7.448. of the Laurentian King. Crouching she sate 7.449. in silence on the threshold of the bower 7.450. where Queen Amata in her fevered soul 7.451. pondered, with all a woman's wrath and fear 7.452. upon the Trojans and the marriage-suit 7.453. of Turnus. From her Stygian hair the fiend 7.454. a single serpent flung, which stole its way 7.455. to the Queen's very heart, that, frenzy-driven 7.456. he might on her whole house confusion pour. 7.457. Betwixt her smooth breast and her robe it wound 7.458. unfelt, unseen, and in her wrathful mind 7.459. instilled its viper soul. Like golden chain 7.460. around her neck it twined, or stretched along 7.461. the fillets on her brow, or with her hair 7.462. enwrithing coiled; then on from limb to limb 7.463. lipped tortuous. Yet though the venom strong 7.464. thrilled with its first infection every vein 7.465. and touched her bones with fire, she knew it not 7.466. nor yielded all her soul, but made her plea 7.467. in gentle accents such as mothers use; 7.468. and many a tear she shed, about her child 7.469. her darling, destined for a Phrygian's bride: 7.470. “O father! can we give Lavinia's hand 7.471. to Trojan fugitives? why wilt thou show 7.472. no mercy on thy daughter, nor thyself;
12. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
13. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 6.2.30-6.2.31 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 6.2.30-6.2.31 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acanthis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
acheron Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
aeneas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212, 217, 218
aetiology Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212
allecto Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 218
amor Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212
amycle Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
ancilla Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
anna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212, 217, 218
antigone Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
apollo Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 245
apollonius rhodius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
ara pacis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
audiences, popular Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
augustus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
autonomy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
beginnings (of poetry books) Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
bovillae, perenna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212, 217
bovillae Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212
callimachus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
carthage Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 218
cemetery, protestant, at testaccio Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
ceres Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212
chalciope Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
chloris Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212, 217
cicero Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
comedy Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
cult of the dead, roman Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
cupid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
cynthia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212, 305, 316; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
dido Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
dreams Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212, 217, 218, 305, 316
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
ennius Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 316
epicureanism, theories of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
epitaph Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
euryalus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
eurydice Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
fidelity Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
ghost Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
ghosts Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
hesiod Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
hippolytus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
home Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305, 316
homer Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
homeric epics, ancient comparisons, augustan poets' use of" Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 183
homeric epics, ancient comparisons, between Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 183
horace, tagging Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 346
horace, works, epodes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 346
immortality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
interpretive community Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
iole Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
ismene Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
knowledge, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
lalage Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
lament Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
lavinia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212
loss Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
lucretius, de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
lycinna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
lygdamus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
maps and mapping Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209, 210
mars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
medea Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
mercury Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 346
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
naevius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
nisus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
nomas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
ovid, amores Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 245
ovid Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 183
parthenie Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
patroclus Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
peace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
perception, lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
personification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
petale Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
phyllis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
plautus, miles gloriosus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
poets, dependence on readers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
presence/absence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
propertius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 346; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212, 305, 316; Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41, 245; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209, 210
prophecy Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
puella(e) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
reader response Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
reincarnation/transmigration Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270
religio Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
return Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
role reversal Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209, 210
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
rome Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 212
senses, in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, in the roman cult of the death Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
senses, lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
servius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 218
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 210
tarpeia Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 245
teia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217, 218
tense, future perfect Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
tombs Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 305
underworld Lehoux et al., Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science (2013) 270; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
varro Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 218
venus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209, 210
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 217
vetula-skoptik Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 346
virgil Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 41
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
visual texts' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209
vita focae Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
vita gudiana i Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
vita philargyrii i Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316
vita seruii Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 316