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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9804
Propertius, Elegies, 4.7
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Horace, Letters, 1.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.2. For some of them apply themselves to this part of learning to show their skill in composition, and that they may therein acquire a reputation for speaking finely. Others of them there are who write histories in order to gratify those that happen to be concerned in them, and on that account have spared no pains, but rather gone beyond their own abilities in the performance. 1.2. neither could the legislator himself have a right mind without such a contemplation; nor would any thing he should write tend to the promotion of virtue in his readers; I mean, unless they be taught first of all, that God is the Father and Lord of all things, and sees all things, and that thence he bestows a happy life upon those that follow him; but plunges such as do not walk in the paths of virtue into inevitable miseries. 1.2. And when God had replied that there was no good man among the Sodomites; for if there were but ten such man among them, he would not punish any of them for their sins, Abraham held his peace. And the angels came to the city of the Sodomites, and Lot entreated them to accept of a lodging with him; for he was a very generous and hospitable man, and one that had learned to imitate the goodness of Abraham. Now when the Sodomites saw the young men to be of beautiful counteces, and this to an extraordinary degree, and that they took up their lodgings with Lot, they resolved themselves to enjoy these beautiful boys by force and violence;
2. Horace, Sermones, 2.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.5. For I also have observed, that many men are very much delighted when they see a man who first began to reproach another, to be himself exposed to contempt on account of the vices he hath himself been guilty of. 2.5. for when these Alexandrians were making war with Cleopatra the queen, and were in danger of being utterly ruined, these Jews brought them to terms of agreement, and freed them from the miseries of a civil war. “But then (says Apion) Onias brought a small army afterward upon the city at the time when Thermus the Roman ambassador was there present.”
3. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 1.112-1.126 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Amores, 1.2 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

5. Ovid, Epistulae (Heroides), 1 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

6. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4-3.5, 4.4.16, 4.6, 4.6.11, 4.8 (1st cent. BCE - missingth cent. CE)

7. Vergil, Aeneis, 2

8. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apollo Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 245
ara pacis Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
audiences,popular Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
autonomy Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
cult of the dead,roman Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
empire,as territorial expanse Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
epicureanism,theories of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
ghost Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
homer Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
homeric epics,ancient comparisons,augustan poets' use of" Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 183
homeric epics,ancient comparisons,between Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 183
immortality Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
interpretive community Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
knowledge,in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
lucretius,de rerum natura (dnr) Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
maps and mapping Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
margins and marginality Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209, 210
mars Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
monuments Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
ovid,amores Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 245
ovid Cairns (1989), Virgil's Augustan Epic. 183
peace Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
perception,lucretius epicurean theory of perception/the senses Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
personification Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
poets,dependence on readers Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
presence/absence Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
propertius Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41, 245; Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209, 210
public and private lives Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
reader response Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
religio Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
ritual Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
role reversal Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209, 210
romanitas Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
senses,in lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
senses,in the roman cult of the death Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
senses,lucretius epicurean theory of sight Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
senses,lucretius epicurean theory of the senses Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
signs and semiotics Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 210
tarpeia Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 245
underworld Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
venus Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209, 210
virgil Nuno et al. (2021), SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism, 41
vision and viewership Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209
visual texts' Pandey (2018), The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome, 209