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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9804
Propertius, Elegies, 4.1.64-4.1.66
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1. Homer, Iliad, 9.529-9.599 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.529. /that were warriors, whenso furious wrath came upon any; won might they be by gifts, and turned aside by pleadings. Myself I bear in mind this deed of old days and not of yesterday, how it was; and I will tell it among you that are all my friends. The Curetes on a time were fighting and the Aetolians staunch in battle 9.530. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.531. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.532. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.533. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.534. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.535. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.536. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.537. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.538. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.539. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. Thereat the Archer-goddess, the child of Zeus, waxed wroth and sent against him a fierce wild boar, white of tusk 9.540. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.541. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.542. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.543. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.544. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.545. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.546. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.547. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.548. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.549. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.550. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.551. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.552. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.553. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.554. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.555. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.556. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.557. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.558. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.559. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.560. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.561. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.562. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.563. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.564. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.565. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.566. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.567. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.568. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.569. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.570. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.571. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.572. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.573. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.574. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.575. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.576. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.577. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.578. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.579. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.580. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.581. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.582. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.583. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.584. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. And earnestly the old horseman Oeneus besought him, standing upon the threshold of his high-roofed chamber, and shaking the jointed doors, in prayer to his son, and earnestly too did his sisters and his honoured mother beseech him 9.585. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.586. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.587. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.588. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.589. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.590. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.591. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.592. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.593. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.594. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.595. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.596. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.597. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.598. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.599. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil.
2. Cicero, Republic, 2.58 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.58. Nam cum esset ex aere alieno commota civitas, plebs montem sacrum prius, deinde Aventinum occupavit. Ac ne Lycurgi quidem disciplina tenuit illos in hominibus Graecis frenos; nam etiam Spartae regte Theopompo sunt item quinque, quos illi ephoros appellant, in Creta autem decem, qui cosmoe vocantur, ut contra consulare imperium tribuni pl., sic illi contra vim regiam constituti.
3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1.85.6, 1.87.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.85.6.  They did not both favour the same site for the building of the city; for Romulus proposed to settle the Palatine hill, among other reasons, because of the good fortune of the place where they had been preserved and brought up, whereas Remus favoured the place that is now named after him Remoria. And indeed this place is very suitable for a city, being a hill not far from the Tiber and about thirty stades from Rome. From this rivalry their unsociable love of rule immediately began to disclose itself; for on the one who now yielded the victor would inevitably impose his will on all occasions alike. 1.87.3.  Remus having been slain in this action, Romulus, who had gained a most melancholy victory through the death of his brother and the mutual slaughter of citizens, buried Remus at Remoria, since when alive he had clung to it as the site for the new city. As for himself, in his grief and repentance for what had happened, he became dejected and lost all desire for life. But when Laurentia, who had received the babes when newly born and brought them up and loved them no less than a mother, entreated and comforted him, he listened to her and rose up, and gathering together the Latins who had not been slain in the battle (they were now little more than three thousand out of a very great multitude at first, when he led out the colony), he built a city on the Palatine hill.
4. Horace, Odes, 1.31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.31. Now these caves were in the precipices of craggy mountains, and could not be come at from any side, since they had only some winding pathways, very narrow, by which they got up to them; but the rock that lay on their front had beneath it valleys of a vast depth, and of an almost perpendicular declivity; insomuch that the king was doubtful for a long time what to do, by reason of a kind of impossibility there was of attacking the place. Yet did he at length make use of a contrivance that was subject to the utmost hazard; 1.31. 1. At the same time that Antiochus, who was called Epiphanes, had a quarrel with the sixth Ptolemy about his right to the whole country of Syria, a great sedition fell among the men of power in Judea, and they had a contention about obtaining the government; while each of those that were of dignity could not endure to be subject to their equals. However, Onias, one of the high priests, got the better, and cast the sons of Tobias out of the city;
5. Livy, History, 1.6.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.1-1.15.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.89 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.746-15.761 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Propertius, Elegies, 1.1, 2.31, 2.31.3-2.31.8, 2.31.12-2.31.16, 2.32.11-2.32.16, 3.1.1-3.1.4, 3.4, 3.11.30-3.11.51, 4.2.3-4.2.4, 4.4.33-4.4.36, 4.4.55-4.4.58, 4.6, 4.6.80-4.6.82 (1st cent. BCE

10. Sallust, Iugurtha, 31.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.1.53-1.1.58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.678-8.681, 8.720-8.722 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain
13. Juvenal, Satires, 3.84-3.85 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Plutarch, Romulus, 9.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.4. But when they set out to establish their city, a dispute at once arose concerning the site. Romulus, accordingly, built Roma Quadrata (which means square ),and wished to have the city on that site; but Remus laid out a strong precinct on the Aventine hill, which was named from him Remonium, but now is called Rignarium.
15. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 53.1.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

53.1.4.  He also celebrated in company with Agrippa the festival which had been voted in honour of the victory won at Actium; and during this celebration he caused the boys and men of the nobility to take part in the Circensian games.
16. Callimachus, Hymns, 4.165-4.170



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium, battle of Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183, 184, 185, 186
alba longa Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183, 184
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117, 380
altar of hercules (ara maxima) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
apollo, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
apollo Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
apollonius rhodius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
appian way Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
ara maxima (altar of hercules) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
atalanta Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
augustus, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
augustus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
aventine hill Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
c. cilnius maecenas Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
c. suetonius tranquillus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
calenzio, elisio Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
callimachus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
capitol, potency of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
cattle in rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
civil war, discordia Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
cleopatra Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
cynthia (in propertius) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
de proelio apud troiam Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
diana Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
didactic, poetry Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
dido Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
funerals Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
gaius and lucius, augustus grandsons Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 186
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
gardens Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
gods and divinities Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
hills of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
homer Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
hunt(ing), erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
hunt(ing) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
ideology Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
immigration Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
julius caesar Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 184, 185, 186
jupiter feretrius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
ludi quinquennales Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
m. velleius paterculus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
maecenas, and propertius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
maecenas, literary patronage Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
mark antony (triumvir) Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
martial Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
medea Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
milanion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
militia amoris Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
naples Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
new gardens Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
nostalgia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
palatine hill, aristocratic character Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
pandoni, porcelio dé Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
parthia Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 186
patrizi, francesco Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
patronage, of literature Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
peto, francesco Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
pharsalus, battle of, lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
pompey, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
pontano, giovanni, urania Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
portico of apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
portico of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
propaganda Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
propertius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117, 380
ptolemy ii philadelphus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
remus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
renaissance, italy Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
renaissance Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
romanus' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
rome Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
romulus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
sannazaro, jacopo, arcadia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
sannazaro, jacopo Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
serena, aurelio Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
servius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
sex. propertius (the poet) Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
symposium Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 186
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
temple of, diana Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
temple of jupiter feretrius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
temples, on the palatine Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183, 184
tibullus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
topography of rome, from propertius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
translation Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 380
umbricius (juvenal) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120
vertumnus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 120