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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9804
Propertius, Elegies, 3.4-3.5
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 1.246, 22.70-22.78 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Duties, 2.45 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.45. Quorum autem prima aetas propter humilitatem et obscuritatem in hominum ignoratione versatur, ii, simul ac iuvenes esse coeperunt, magna spectare et ad ea rectis studiis debent contendere; quod eo firmiore animo facient, quia non modo non invidetur illi aetati, verum etiam favetur. Prima igitur est adulescenti commendatio ad gloriam, si qua ex bellicis rebus comparari potest, in qua multi apud maiores nostros exstiterunt; semper enim fere bella gerebantur. Tua autem aetas incidit in id bellum, cuius altera pars sceleris nimium habuit, altera felicitatis parum. Quo tamen in bello cum te Pompeius alae alteri praefecisset, magnam laudem et a summo viro et ab exercitu consequebare equitando, iaculando, omni militari labore tolerando. Atque ea quidem tua laus pariter cum re publica cecidit. Mihi autem haec oratio suscepta non de te est, sed de genere toto; quam ob rein pergarnus ad ea, quae restant. 2.45.  Those, on the other hand, whose humble and obscure origin has kept them unknown to the world in their early years ought, as soon as they approach young manhood, to set a high ideal before their eyes and to strive with unswerving zeal towards its realization. This they will do with the better heart, because that time of life is accustomed to find favour rather than to meet with opposition. Well, then, the first thing to recommend to a young man in his quest for glory is that he try to win it, if he can, in a military career. Among our forefathers many distinguished themselves as soldiers; for warfare was almost continuous then. The period of your own youth, however, has coincided with that war in which the one side was too prolific in crime, the other in failure. And yet, when Pompey placed you in command of a cavalry squadron in this war, you won the applause of that great man and of the army for your skill in riding and spear-throwing and for endurance of all the hardships of the soldier's life. But that credit accorded to you came to nothing along with the fall of the republic. The subject of this discussion, however, is not your personal history, but the general theme. Let us, therefore, proceed to the sequel.
3. Cicero, On Old Age, 56-61, 55 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 21, 27, 20 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Catullus, Poems, 64.121 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.34. 1.  The town being taken in this manner, he ordered the prisoners to deliver up their arms, and taking such of their children for hostages as he thought fit, he marched against the Antemnates. And having conquered their army also, in the same manner as the other, by falling upon them unexpectedly while they were still dispersed in foraging, and having accorded the same treatment to the prisoners, he led his army home, carrying with him the spoils of those who had been slain in battle and the choicest part of the booty as an offering to the gods; and he offered many sacrifices besides.,2.  Romulus himself came last in the procession, clad in a purple robe and wearing a crown of laurel upon his head, and, that he might maintain the royal dignity, he rode in a chariot drawn by four horses. The rest of the army, both foot and horse, followed, ranged in their several divisions, praising the gods in songs of their country and extolling their general in improvised verses. They were met by the citizens with their wives and children, who, ranging themselves on each side of the road, congratulated them upon their victory and expressed their welcome in every other way. When the army entered the city, they found mixing bowls filled to the brim with wine and tables loaded down with all sorts of viands, which were placed before the most distinguished houses in order that all who pleased might take their fill.,3.  Such was the victorious procession, marked by the carrying of trophies and concluding with a sacrifice, which the Romans call a triumph, as it was first instituted by Romulus. But in our day the triumph had become a very costly and ostentatious pageant, being attended with a theatrical pomp that is designed rather as a display of wealth than as approbation of valour, and it has departed in every respect from its ancient simplicity.,4.  After the procession and the sacrifice Romulus built a small temple on the summit of the Capitoline hill to Jupiter whom the Romans call Feretrius; indeed, the ancient traces of it still remain, of which the longest sides are less than fifteen feet. In this temple he consecrated the spoils of the king of the Caeninenses, whom he had slain with his own hand. As for Jupiter Feretrius, to whom Romulus dedicated these arms, one will not err from the truth whether one wishes to call him Tropaiouchos, or Skylophoros, as some will have it, or, since he excels all things and comprehends universal nature and motion, Hyperpheretês.
7. Horace, Odes, 1.2.33-1.2.36, 1.2.41, 1.2.44, 1.2.49-1.2.52, 1.12.53-1.12.56, 1.29, 1.35.30, 1.35.33-1.35.36, 3.1-3.6, 3.2.13, 3.14, 3.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.29. Moreover, what the Romans did to the remains of the wall; and how they demolished the strongholds that were in the country; and how Titus went over the whole country, and settled its affairs; together with his return into Italy, and his triumph. 1.29. 3. Now by this time Herod had sailed out of Italy, and was come to Ptolemais; and as soon as he had gotten together no small army of foreigners, and of his own countrymen, he marched through Galilee against Antigonus, wherein he was assisted by Ventidius and Silo, both whom Dellius, a person sent by Antony, persuaded to bring Herod [into his kingdom]. 3.1. 1. When Nero was informed of the Romans’ ill success in Judea, a concealed consternation and terror, as is usual in such cases, fell upon him; although he openly looked very big, and was very angry 3.1. They also esteem any errors they commit upon taking counsel beforehand to be better than such rash success as is owing to fortune only; because such a fortuitous advantage tempts them to be inconsiderate, while consultation, though it may sometimes fail of success, hath this good in it, that it makes men more careful hereafter; 3.1. This is an ancient city that is distant from Jerusalem five hundred and twenty furlongs, and was always an enemy to the Jews; on which account they determined to make their first effort against it, and to make their approaches to it as near as possible. 3.2. and said that what had happened was rather owing to the negligence of the commander, than to any valor of the enemy: and as he thought it fit for him, who bare the burden of the whole empire, to despise such misfortunes, he now pretended so to do, and to have a soul superior to all such sad accidents whatsoever. Yet did the disturbance that was in his soul plainly appear by the solicitude he was in [how to recover his affairs again]. 3.2. That he did not see what advantage he could bring to them now, by staying among them, but only provoke the Romans to besiege them more closely, as esteeming it a most valuable thing to take him; but that if they were once informed that he was fled out of the city, they would greatly remit of their eagerness against it. 3.2. and the greater part of the remainder were wounded, with Niger, their remaining general, who fled away together to a small city of Idumea, called Sallis. 3.3. 2. And as he was deliberating to whom he should commit the care of the East, now it was in so great a commotion, and who might be best able to punish the Jews for their rebellion, and might prevent the same distemper from seizing upon the neighboring nations also,— 3.3. So he came quickly to the city, and put his army in order, and set Trajan over the left wing, while he had the right himself, and led them to the siege: 3.3. At this city also the inhabitants of Sepphoris of Galilee met him, who were for peace with the Romans. 3.4. he found no one but Vespasian equal to the task, and able to undergo the great burden of so mighty a war, seeing he was growing an old man already in the camp, and from his youth had been exercised in warlike exploits: he was also a man that had long ago pacified the west, and made it subject to the Romans, when it had been put into disorder by the Germans; he had also recovered to them Britain by his arms 3.4. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.4. its length is also from Meloth to Thella, a village near to Jordan. 3.5. which had been little known before whereby he procured to his father Claudius to have a triumph bestowed on him without any sweat or labor of his own. 3.5. and for those rivers which they have, all their waters are exceedingly sweet: by reason also of the excellent grass they have, their cattle yield more milk than do those in other places; and, what is the greatest sign of excellency and of abundance, they each of them are very full of people. 3.5. There was also a great slaughter made in the city, while those foreigners that had not fled away already made opposition; but the natural inhabitants were killed without fighting: for in hopes of Titus’s giving them his right hand for their security, and out of a consciousness that they had not given any consent to the war, they avoided fighting 3.6. 3. So Nero esteemed these circumstances as favorable omens, and saw that Vespasian’s age gave him sure experience, and great skill, and that he had his sons as hostages for his fidelity to himself, and that the flourishing age they were in would make them fit instruments under their father’s prudence. Perhaps also there was some interposition of Providence, which was paving the way for Vespasian’s being himself emperor afterwards. 3.6. These last, by marching continually one way or other, and overrunning the parts of the adjoining country, were very troublesome to Josephus and his men; they also plundered all the places that were out of the city’s liberty, and intercepted such as durst go abroad. 3.14. Accordingly, he wrote these things, and sent messengers immediately to carry his letter to Jerusalem. 3.14. but Antonius, who was not unapprised of the attack they were going to make upon the city, drew out his horsemen beforehand, and being neither daunted at the multitude, nor at the courage of the enemy, received their first attacks with great bravery; and when they crowded to the very walls, he beat them off.
8. Horace, Epodes, 7.3-7.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Ovid, Amores, 1.2, 1.9, 3.1, 3.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.179, 1.203-1.205, 1.209-1.228, 3.119-3.122 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Ovid, Fasti, 1.135-1.136 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.135. Every doorway has two sides, this way and that 1.136. One facing the crowds, and the other the Lares:
12. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.97-1.100, 1.185-1.205, 15.871-15.879 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Ovid, Tristia, 2.253-2.312, 2.445-2.446, 3.1, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1.31-2.1.34, 2.14.23-2.14.24, 2.31-2.32, 2.34, 3.1-3.3, 3.3.6, 3.3.16, 3.4.1-3.4.6, 3.5, 3.9, 3.11.30-3.11.51, 3.12.3, 3.17, 4.1, 4.1.61, 4.3, 4.6-4.8, 4.6.80-4.6.82 (1st cent. BCE

15. Sallust, Catiline, 2.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.1.1-1.1.5, 1.1.53-1.1.58, 1.3.47-1.3.48, 1.10.7-1.10.12, 1.10.55-1.10.66 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.1, 2.577-2.578, 2.788, 3.651-3.652, 6.752-6.892, 8.626, 8.671-8.731, 9.638-9.658, 10.6-10.15, 10.495-10.505 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. Arms and the man I sing, who first made way 2.577. of all my kin! bear witness that my breast 2.578. hrank not from any sword the Grecian drew 3.651. a noble helmet, too, with flaming crest 3.652. and lofty cone, th' accoutrement erewhile 6.752. Came on my view; their hands made stroke at Heaven 6.753. And strove to thrust Jove from his seat on high. 6.754. I saw Salmoneus his dread stripes endure 6.755. Who dared to counterfeit Olympian thunder 6.756. And Jove's own fire. In chariot of four steeds 6.757. Brandishing torches, he triumphant rode 6.758. Through throngs of Greeks, o'er Elis ' sacred way 6.759. Demanding worship as a god. 0 fool! 6.760. To mock the storm's inimitable flash— 6.761. With crash of hoofs and roll of brazen wheel! 6.762. But mightiest Jove from rampart of thick cloud 6.763. Hurled his own shaft, no flickering, mortal flame 6.764. And in vast whirl of tempest laid him low. 6.765. Next unto these, on Tityos I looked 6.766. Child of old Earth, whose womb all creatures bears: 6.767. Stretched o'er nine roods he lies; a vulture huge 6.768. Tears with hooked beak at his immortal side 6.769. Or deep in entrails ever rife with pain 6.770. Gropes for a feast, making his haunt and home 6.771. In the great Titan bosom; nor will give 6.772. To ever new-born flesh surcease of woe. 6.773. Why name Ixion and Pirithous 6.774. The Lapithae, above whose impious brows 6.775. A crag of flint hangs quaking to its fall 6.776. As if just toppling down, while couches proud 6.777. Propped upon golden pillars, bid them feast 6.778. In royal glory: but beside them lies 6.779. The eldest of the Furies, whose dread hands 6.780. Thrust from the feast away, and wave aloft 6.781. A flashing firebrand, with shrieks of woe. 6.782. Here in a prison-house awaiting doom 6.783. Are men who hated, long as life endured 6.784. Their brothers, or maltreated their gray sires 6.785. Or tricked a humble friend; the men who grasped 6.786. At hoarded riches, with their kith and kin 6.787. Not sharing ever—an unnumbered throng; 6.788. Here slain adulterers be; and men who dared 6.789. To fight in unjust cause, and break all faith 6.790. With their own lawful lords. Seek not to know 6.791. What forms of woe they feel, what fateful shape 6.792. of retribution hath o'erwhelmed them there. 6.793. Some roll huge boulders up; some hang on wheels 6.794. Lashed to the whirling spokes; in his sad seat 6.795. Theseus is sitting, nevermore to rise; 6.796. Unhappy Phlegyas uplifts his voice 6.797. In warning through the darkness, calling loud 6.798. ‘0, ere too late, learn justice and fear God!’ 6.799. Yon traitor sold his country, and for gold 6.800. Enchained her to a tyrant, trafficking 6.801. In laws, for bribes enacted or made void; 6.802. Another did incestuously take 6.803. His daughter for a wife in lawless bonds. 6.804. All ventured some unclean, prodigious crime; 6.805. And what they dared, achieved. I could not tell 6.806. Not with a hundred mouths, a hundred tongues 6.807. Or iron voice, their divers shapes of sin 6.809. So spake Apollo's aged prophetess. 6.810. “Now up and on!” she cried. “Thy task fulfil! 6.811. We must make speed. Behold yon arching doors 6.812. Yon walls in furnace of the Cyclops forged! 6.813. 'T is there we are commanded to lay down 6.814. Th' appointed offering.” So, side by side 6.815. Swift through the intervening dark they strode 6.816. And, drawing near the portal-arch, made pause. 6.817. Aeneas, taking station at the door 6.818. Pure, lustral waters o'er his body threw 6.820. Now, every rite fulfilled, and tribute due 6.821. Paid to the sovereign power of Proserpine 6.822. At last within a land delectable 6.823. Their journey lay, through pleasurable bowers 6.824. of groves where all is joy,—a blest abode! 6.825. An ampler sky its roseate light bestows 6.826. On that bright land, which sees the cloudless beam 6.827. of suns and planets to our earth unknown. 6.828. On smooth green lawns, contending limb with limb 6.829. Immortal athletes play, and wrestle long 6.830. 'gainst mate or rival on the tawny sand; 6.831. With sounding footsteps and ecstatic song 6.832. Some thread the dance divine: among them moves 6.833. The bard of Thrace, in flowing vesture clad 6.834. Discoursing seven-noted melody 6.835. Who sweeps the numbered strings with changeful hand 6.836. Or smites with ivory point his golden lyre. 6.837. Here Trojans be of eldest, noblest race 6.838. Great-hearted heroes, born in happier times 6.839. Ilus, Assaracus, and Dardanus 6.840. Illustrious builders of the Trojan town. 6.841. Their arms and shadowy chariots he views 6.842. And lances fixed in earth, while through the fields 6.843. Their steeds without a bridle graze at will. 6.844. For if in life their darling passion ran 6.845. To chariots, arms, or glossy-coated steeds 6.846. The self-same joy, though in their graves, they feel. 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests 6.854. Who kept them undefiled their mortal day; 6.855. And poets, of whom the true-inspired song 6.856. Deserved Apollo's name; and all who found 6.857. New arts, to make man's life more blest or fair; 6.858. Yea! here dwell all those dead whose deeds bequeath 6.859. Deserved and grateful memory to their kind. 6.860. And each bright brow a snow-white fillet wears. 6.861. Unto this host the Sibyl turned, and hailed 6.862. Musaeus, midmost of a numerous throng 6.863. Who towered o'er his peers a shoulder higher: 6.864. “0 spirits blest! 0 venerable bard! 6.865. Declare what dwelling or what region holds 6.866. Anchises, for whose sake we twain essayed 6.867. Yon passage over the wide streams of hell.” 6.868. And briefly thus the hero made reply: 6.869. “No fixed abode is ours. In shadowy groves 6.870. We make our home, or meadows fresh and fair 6.871. With streams whose flowery banks our couches be. 6.872. But you, if thitherward your wishes turn 6.873. Climb yonder hill, where I your path may show.” 6.874. So saying, he strode forth and led them on 6.875. Till from that vantage they had prospect fair 6.876. of a wide, shining land; thence wending down 6.877. They left the height they trod; for far below 6.878. Father Anchises in a pleasant vale 6.879. Stood pondering, while his eyes and thought surveyed 6.880. A host of prisoned spirits, who there abode 6.881. Awaiting entrance to terrestrial air. 6.882. And musing he reviewed the legions bright 6.883. of his own progeny and offspring proud— 6.884. Their fates and fortunes, virtues and great deeds. 6.885. Soon he discerned Aeneas drawing nigh 6.886. o'er the green slope, and, lifting both his hands 6.887. In eager welcome, spread them swiftly forth. 6.888. Tears from his eyelids rained, and thus he spoke: 6.889. “Art here at last? Hath thy well-proven love 6.890. of me thy sire achieved yon arduous way? 6.891. Will Heaven, beloved son, once more allow 6.892. That eye to eye we look? and shall I hear 8.626. in safety stands, I call not Trojan power 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true. 9.638. himself in glorious arms. Then every chief 9.639. awoke his mail-clad company, and stirred 9.640. their slumbering wrath with tidings from the foe. 9.641. Tumultuously shouting, they impaled 9.642. on lifted spears—O pitiable sight! — 9.643. the heads of Nisus and Euryalus. 9.644. Th' undaunted Trojans stood in battle-line 9.645. along the wall to leftward (for the right 9.646. the river-front defended) keeping guard 9.647. on the broad moat; upon the ramparts high 9.648. ad-eyed they stood, and shuddered as they saw 9.649. the hero-faces thrust aloft; too well 9.651. On restless pinions to the trembling town 9.652. had voiceful Rumor hied, and to the ears 9.653. of that lone mother of Euryalus 9.654. relentless flown. Through all her feeble frame 9.655. the chilling sorrow sped. From both her hands 9.656. dropped web and shuttle; she flew shrieking forth 9.657. ill-fated mother! and with tresses torn 9.658. to the wide ramparts and the battle-line 10.6. and Teucria's camp and Latium 's fierce array. 10.7. Beneath the double-gated dome the gods 10.8. were sitting; Jove himself the silence broke: 10.9. “O people of Olympus, wherefore change 10.10. your purpose and decree, with partial minds 10.11. in mighty strife contending? I refused 10.12. uch clash of war 'twixt Italy and Troy . 10.13. Whence this forbidden feud? What fears 10.14. educed to battles and injurious arms 10.15. either this folk or that? Th' appointed hour 10.495. who also for the roughness of the ground 10.496. were all unmounted: he (the last resource 10.497. of men in straits) to wild entreaty turned 10.498. and taunts, enkindling their faint hearts anew: 10.499. “Whither, my men! O, by your own brave deeds 10.500. O, by our lord Evander's happy wars 10.501. the proud hopes I had to make my name 10.502. a rival glory,—think not ye can fly! 10.503. Your swords alone can carve ye the safe way 10.504. traight through your foes. Where yonder warrior-throng 10.505. is fiercest, thickest, there and only there
18. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48, 4.559-4.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 4.559. With a great cry leapt on him, and ere he rose 4.560. Forestalled him with the fetters; he nathless 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing 4.563. Fire and a fearful beast, and flowing stream. 4.564. But when no trickery found a path for flight 4.565. Baffled at length, to his own shape returned 4.566. With human lips he spake, “Who bade thee, then
19. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 36.112 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Plutarch, Crassus, 18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Plutarch, Publicola, 20.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20.2. Besides the triumphs, he also obtained the honour of a house built for him at the public charge on the Palatine. And whereas the doors of other houses at that time opened inwards into the vestibule, they made the outer door of his house, and of his alone, to open outwards, in order that by this concession he might be constantly partaking of public honour.
22. Horatius Flaccus, Carmina, 3.3.11

23. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.95



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium, battle of Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
actium Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199
aeneas, shield of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186, 205
aeneas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 194, 200
agamemnon Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
agrippa Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 372; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181, 196
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 194, 199
antony, mark Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196, 201
apollo, palatine temple of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60, 61
apollo Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
appian Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187
ara pacis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181, 209
artists and gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 185, 195
audiences, heterogeneity of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 197, 200
audiences, popular Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 186, 187, 188, 195, 198, 206, 208, 209
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 184, 186, 188, 191, 201, 205
augustus, as triumphator Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 62, 63, 64
augustus, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
augustus, his plans for a parthian campaign Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 372
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 199, 201, 203, 205
augustus/octavian, as pater patriae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 190, 197, 198, 199, 200, 204, 205
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 204
augustus/octavian, conspiracies against Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 206, 211, 212
augustus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 373
authorial intention Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 195
authority, augustan Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
authority, mutual constitution of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 199
authority, poetic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 187, 189
autocracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
autonomy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 191, 204, 209
bacchus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 372, 373
bacchus in propertius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
belatedness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187
books Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 205
c. cilnius maecenas Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
c. suetonius tranquillus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
cantabrian campaign, carrhae, battle of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 63
cato Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 188, 189, 190, 204, 212
civil war, discordia Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
cleopatra Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
coins Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189, 196
collaborative authorship Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 190
consent, conventions, solidification of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 207
consent Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
copying, of texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 205
corona civica Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
cosmopolis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 213
costs of war Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183
crassus, at carrhae, expected to defeat parthia Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 372
cynthia (in propertius) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 77
divine epiphanies in elegy Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
egypt Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
ekphrasis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 185, 187, 200, 208
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 197, 201, 202, 208, 211
elites Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 184, 186, 187, 188, 189, 198, 199, 200, 201, 206, 210, 213
enargeia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186
ennius Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
epic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 194, 196, 197
epic vs. elegy Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
epicureanism Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60
etymology Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
fama Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 190, 201, 205
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 185, 186, 187, 189, 194, 195, 196, 201, 208, 211
focalization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 196, 199, 200, 203, 213
free speech Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 201, 204
galla, aelia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
gallus, aelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
gallus, cornelius Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 62, 63, 64
gods and divinities Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
golden age Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
gracchus, gaius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 77
hegemony Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188
hercules, choice of Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
homer, odyssey Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
horace, works, carmina iv Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 372
horace, works, epodes, roman odes Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 373
ideology Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 194, 201, 211, 212; Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189, 190, 191, 198, 201, 203, 207, 211
imitatio Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 215
immortality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 205, 210
inconsistency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199, 200, 206
indeterminacy, hindsight Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 205
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 188, 194, 195, 199, 200, 203, 207
indeterminacy, horace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 197
indeterminacy, strategies Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 211
information, transmission across distance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 186, 203
inspiration Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 373
interpretive community Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 209
intertextuality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 195
ithaca Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
judgment Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 204, 205, 208
julius caesar, his plans for a parthian campaign Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 372
katabasis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
lament Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
laurel Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 191, 201; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60, 62, 63, 64
linear and cyclical conceptions of time and space Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182
literacy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182
livius, drusus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 77
livy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 195
lucretius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 184
m. velleius paterculus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
maps and mapping Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181, 182, 183, 186, 187, 188, 210
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 183, 186, 187, 201, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210
mark antony (triumvir) Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
marriage laws Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181
mars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 184, 196, 209
menander Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
metaliterariness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 194, 195, 196, 200, 203
militarism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181, 182, 183, 187, 203, 206, 207, 208, 211, 213
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181, 182, 183, 184, 189, 190, 197, 204, 210
morality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
nostos Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
odysseus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
omens Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 206
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 191, 194
originality Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 372
otium Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65
ovid, tragedy and elegy in amores Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
parade of heroes Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200
paratexts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
parthenope (naples) Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60
parthia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104; Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 63
parthian standards Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 206
parthians, planned campaigns against them Isaac, The invention of racism in classical antiquity (2004) 372
pastoral Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
patronage Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 190, 195
peace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209, 211, 212, 213
performance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 190, 199
personification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196, 210, 212
pharsalus, battle of, lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 191, 204
poets, as prophets Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 206
poets, dependence on readers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 205, 210
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 189, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205
poets, service to empire Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213
pompey Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186, 187, 200
portraiture Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 190, 191
postumus, c. propertius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
power, disciplinary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 201, 204
power, of artists and authors Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 184, 186, 188, 191, 201, 205
presence/absence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186, 203, 205, 207, 210
privacy, and domestic architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 77
prodicus choice of hercules Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
propaganda Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 206; Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
propertius Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 372; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 197, 204, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210; Williams and Vol, Philosophy in Ovid, Ovid as Philosopher (2022) 58
prophecy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 206, 213
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 191, 202, 204, 205, 207, 208, 209
publicola, valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 77
reader response Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200, 209
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 200, 205, 208
recusatio Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 372
reification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 196
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201
res gestae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 190
revisionary, verbs of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 203, 208
rhetoric Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 187
rhine Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 198
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 209
rivers, euphrates Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 197, 203, 206
rivers, nile Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 197, 198, 205
rivers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 206, 208
role reversal Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 209, 210, 211, 212, 213
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 182, 183
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 189, 209
romanization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189, 195
sacred way Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 64, 65
sallust Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
senate Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 199, 204
sex. propertius (the poet) Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 33
shade Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 183, 184, 185, 190, 191, 194, 196, 207, 208, 210, 213
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186, 187, 188, 189, 191, 199, 203, 206, 208
succession Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213
suetonius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187, 204
suitors Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 104
tacitus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 187
temple, as metaliterary devices Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 203
temple Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 184, 189, 199
temples, on the palatine Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60, 61
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 184
tiberius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189, 190, 191, 192, 193
tityrus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60
transcripts, hidden and public Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
triumph, as an imperial monopoly Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188, 190, 211, 213
triumph, servus publicus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 188
triumphs spurned Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 77
triumphus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 61, 62, 63, 64
underworld Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 194, 209
vengeance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 181, 182, 206
venus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 184, 196, 209, 210
vergil Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186, 187, 205
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186, 190, 194, 199, 200, 206, 208, 209
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 186, 191, 194, 196, 200, 209, 213
war, and poetry Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, and roman ideology Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, civil war Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in agricultural writers Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in homer Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
war, in roman elegy Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 242
women Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 203
world' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 213
world Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 212