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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Propertius, Elegies, 2.31-2.32
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 24, 34, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 4.62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.62. 1.  It is said that during the reign of Tarquinius another very wonderful piece of good luck also came to the Roman state, conferred upon it by the favour of some god or other divinity; and this good fortune was not of short duration, but throughout the whole existence of the country it has often saved it from great calamities.,2.  A certain woman who was not a native of the country came to the tyrant wishing to sell him nine books filled with Sibylline oracles; but when Tarquinius refused to purchase the books at the price she asked, she went away and burned three of them. And not long afterwards, bringing the remaining six books, she offered to sell them for the same price. But when they thought her a fool and mocked at her for asking the same price for the smaller number of books that she had been unable to get for even the larger number, she again went away and burned half of those that were left; then, bringing the remaining books, she asked the same amount of money for these.,3.  Tarquinius, wondering at the woman's purpose, sent for the augurs and acquainting them with the matter, asked them what he should do. These, knowing by certain signs that he had rejected a god-sent blessing, and declaring it to be a great misfortune that he had not purchased all the books, directed him to pay the woman all the money she asked and to get the oracles that were left.,4.  The woman, after delivering the books and bidding him take great care of them, disappeared from among men. Tarquinius chose two men of distinction from among the citizens and appointing two public slaves to assist them, entrusted to them the guarding of the books; and when one of these men, named Marcus Atilius, seemed to have been faithless to his trust and was informed upon by one of the public slaves, he ordered him to be sewed up in a leather bag and thrown into the sea as a parricide.,5.  Since the expulsion of the kings, the commonwealth, taking upon itself the guarding of these oracles, entrusts the care of them to persons of the greatest distinction, who hold this office for life, being exempt from military service and from all civil employments, and it assigns public slaves to assist them, in whose absence the others are not permitted to inspect the oracles. In short, there is no possession of the Romans, sacred or profane, which they guard so carefully as they do the Sibylline oracles. They consult them, by order of the senate, when the state is in the grip of party strife or some great misfortune has happened to them in war, or some important prodigies and apparitions have been seen which are difficult of interpretation, as has often happened. These oracles till the time of the Marsian War, as it was called, were kept underground in the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus in a stone chest under the guard of ten men.,6.  But when the temple was burned after the close of the one hundred and seventy-third Olympiad, either purposely, as some think, or by accident, these oracles together with all the offerings consecrated to the god were destroyed by the fire. Those which are now extant have been scraped together from many places, some from the cities of Italy, others from Erythrae in Asia (whither three envoys were sent by vote of the senate to copy them), and others were brought from other cities, transcribed by private persons. Some of these are found to be interpolations among the genuine Sibylline oracles, being recognized as such by means of the so‑called acrostics. In all this I am following the account given by Terentius Varro in his work on religion.
3. Horace, Odes, 1.31, 1.37.6-1.37.8, 3.3.42, 3.30.1-3.30.5, 3.30.8-3.30.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.31. Now these caves were in the precipices of craggy mountains, and could not be come at from any side, since they had only some winding pathways, very narrow, by which they got up to them; but the rock that lay on their front had beneath it valleys of a vast depth, and of an almost perpendicular declivity; insomuch that the king was doubtful for a long time what to do, by reason of a kind of impossibility there was of attacking the place. Yet did he at length make use of a contrivance that was subject to the utmost hazard; 1.31. 1. At the same time that Antiochus, who was called Epiphanes, had a quarrel with the sixth Ptolemy about his right to the whole country of Syria, a great sedition fell among the men of power in Judea, and they had a contention about obtaining the government; while each of those that were of dignity could not endure to be subject to their equals. However, Onias, one of the high priests, got the better, and cast the sons of Tobias out of the city;
4. Horace, Letters, 1.3.17, 2.1.1-2.1.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Amores, 3.8.35-3.8.36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 2.277 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Fasti, 4.951-4.954, 5.347-5.350, 5.551-5.568, 6.267, 6.320, 6.460 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.951. For Vesta, and the third part that’s left, Caesar occupies. 4.952. Long live the laurels of the Palatine: long live that house 4.953. Decked with branches of oak: one place holds three eternal gods. 5.347. Bacchus loves flowers: you can see he delight 5.348. In a crown, from Ariadne’s chaplet of stars. 5.349. The comic stage suits her: she’s never: believe me 5.350. Never been counted among the tragic goddesses. 5.551. Am I wrong, or did weapons clash? I’m not: they clashed 5.552. Mars comes, giving the sign for war as he comes. 5.553. The Avenger himself descends from the sky 5.554. To view his shrine and honours in Augustus’ forum. 5.555. The god and the work are mighty: Mar 5.556. Could not be housed otherwise in his son’s city. 5.557. The shrine is worthy of trophies won from Giants: 5.558. From it the Marching God initiates fell war 5.559. When impious men attack us from the East 5.560. Or those from the setting sun must be conquered. 5.561. The God of Arms sees the summits of the work 5.562. And approves of unbeaten gods holding the heights. 5.563. He sees the various weapons studding the doors 5.564. Weapons from lands conquered by his armies. 5.565. Here he views Aeneas bowed by his dear burden 5.566. And many an ancestor of the great Julian line: 5.567. There he views Romulus carrying Acron’s weapon 5.568. And famous heroes’ deeds below their ranked statues. 6.267. Vesta’s identified with Earth: in them both’s unsleeping fire: 6.320. It’s a brief tale but it’s a merry one. 6.460. Have violated: since divine Earth and Vesta are one.
8. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.185-1.205, 1.557-1.566, 2.1-2.24, 2.766-2.770, 4.763-4.765, 8.644-8.648, 8.698-8.702, 10.456-10.457 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Ovid, Tristia, 2.253-2.312, 2.445-2.446, 3.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Propertius, Elegies, 2.1, 2.1.25, 2.24.2, 2.32, 2.34, 3.1.1-3.1.4, 3.4, 3.9, 3.9.43-3.9.60, 4.4.73-4.4.78, 4.6, 4.6.11 (1st cent. BCE

11. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.3, 2.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.462, 6.56-6.66, 6.72, 8.671-8.731 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.462. honors divine. We Tyrian virgins oft 6.57. Deep in the face of that Euboean crag 6.58. A cavern vast is hollowed out amain 6.59. With hundred openings, a hundred mouths 6.60. Whence voices flow, the Sibyl's answering songs. 6.61. While at the door they paused, the virgin cried : 6.62. “Ask now thy doom!—the god! the god is nigh!” 6.63. So saying, from her face its color flew 6.64. Her twisted locks flowed free, the heaving breast 6.65. Swelled with her heart's wild blood; her stature seemed 6.66. Vaster, her accent more than mortal man 6.72. of the bold Trojans; while their sacred King 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true.
13. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48, 4.561-4.566 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there 4.561. All unforgetful of his ancient craft 4.562. Transforms himself to every wondrous thing 4.563. Fire and a fearful beast, and flowing stream. 4.564. But when no trickery found a path for flight 4.565. Baffled at length, to his own shape returned 4.566. With human lips he spake, “Who bade thee, then
14. Martial, Epigrams, 1.35.8-1.35.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Martial, Epigrams, 1.35.8-1.35.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 13.88, 34.57-34.58, 36.13, 36.42 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Suetonius, Augustus, 29.1, 29.3, 31.1, 70.1-70.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Tacitus, Annals, 15.38 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.38.  There followed a disaster, whether due to chance or to the malice of the sovereign is uncertain — for each version has its sponsors — but graver and more terrible than any other which has befallen this city by the ravages of fire. It took its rise in the part of the Circus touching the Palatine and Caelian Hills; where, among the shops packed with inflammable goods, the conflagration broke out, gathered strength in the same moment, and, impelled by the wind, swept the full length of the Circus: for there were neither mansions screened by boundary walls, nor temples surrounded by stone enclosures, nor obstructions of any description, to bar its progress. The flames, which in full career overran the level districts first, then shot up to the heights, and sank again to harry the lower parts, kept ahead of all remedial measures, the mischief travelling fast, and the town being an easy prey owing to the narrow, twisting lanes and formless streets typical of old Rome. In addition, shrieking and terrified women; fugitives stricken or immature in years; men consulting their own safety or the safety of others, as they dragged the infirm along or paused to wait for them, combined by their dilatoriness or their haste to impede everything. often, while they glanced back to the rear, they were attacked on the flanks or in front; or, if they had made their escape into a neighbouring quarter, that also was involved in the flames, and even districts which they had believed remote from danger were found to be in the same plight. At last, irresolute what to avoid or what to seek, they crowded into the roads or threw themselves down in the fields: some who had lost the whole of their means — their daily bread included — chose to die, though the way of escape was open, and were followed by others, through love for the relatives whom they had proved unable to rescue. None ventured to combat the fire, as there were reiterated threats from a large number of persons who forbade extinction, and others were openly throwing firebrands and shouting that "they had their authority" — possibly in order to have a freer hand in looting, possibly from orders received.
19. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 49.15.5, 53.1.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

49.15.5.  But this was mere idle talk. The people at this time resolved that a house should be presented to Caesar at public expense; for he had made public property of the place on the Palatine which he had bought for the purpose of erecting a residence upon it, and had consecrated it to Apollo, after a thunderbolt had descended upon it. Hence they voted him the house and also protection from any insult by deed or word; 53.1.4.  He also celebrated in company with Agrippa the festival which had been voted in honour of the victory won at Actium; and during this celebration he caused the boys and men of the nobility to take part in the Circensian games.
20. Gellius, Attic Nights, 1.19 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 1.6.10-1.6.11 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

22. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 6.72 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

23. Servius, In Vergilii Bucolicon Librum, 4.10 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

24. Callimachus, Hymns, 4.165-4.170

25. Manilius, Astronomica, 4.254-4.256

26. Tzetzes John, Ad Lycophronem, 1279

27. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 1.11.3, 2.81.3

28. Zonaras, Epitome, 7.11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium, battle of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
actium Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101
aeneas, and the sibyl Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
aeneas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
aetiology, origins, causae Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
age, golden Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
alba longa Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
alexander the great Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
antony, mark Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 97
apollo, palatine temple of Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60, 61
apollo, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 294, 329
apollo Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
ara pacis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
architects Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
artists and gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 96, 99
astronomy, stars Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
athens Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
audiences, popular Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
audiences, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 100, 101
augurs Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
augustus, augustus house on the palatine Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 329
augustus, forum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 294, 329
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 97, 204
augustus/octavian, as reader Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
augustus/octavian, conspiracies against Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
augustus/octavian, relation with the gods Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 96, 99
augustus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
aurea aetas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
authorial intention Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93
authority, augustan Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 97
autocracy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92
autonomy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 96, 115, 134, 204
battle, of actium Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 119
belatedness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 115
books Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101
callimachus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
capitol, potency of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 329
carthage Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 119
chastity, lack of chastity, impudicitia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
civil wars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 95, 100
closeness to the gods, of augustus and vesta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
clupeus virtutis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 100
consent Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 97
copying, of texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 95, 98, 99
cumae Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
cynthia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
cynthia (in propertius) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
deucalion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
diana Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
divinity (of a mortal) Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
ekphrasis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 98, 99, 208
elegy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 208; Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
elites Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 204
emotions, happiness Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93
envy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
epic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 97
epicureanism Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60
eroticism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
female spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
festivals, floralia Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
festivals and rites, parilia Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
festivals and rites Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
flora Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
focalization Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 96, 208
focalization and perspective, and time Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 94
forgetting Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 119
forum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forum augustum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 294, 329
forum iulium Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forums, imperial Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
free speech Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
gender, androcentric Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
gender Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
greece Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
greek, roman Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
hegemony Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 101
hellenistic architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
horace, carmen saeculare Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63; Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
hyperbole Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
ideology Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92
indeterminacy, hindsight Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92
indeterminacy, hypermnestra Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 94, 99
interior spaces, palaces and houses of wealthy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
judgment Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 99, 101, 134, 204, 208
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
juno Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 329
jupiter, capitolinus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
legend, myth, fabula Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
libertas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 99, 115; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60
libraries Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 329; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 101
livia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
love trysts, venues for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
ludi quinquennales Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
maecenas, and propertius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
manilius, astronomica Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 94, 208
marriage laws Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101, 115
mars Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
mars avenger, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 329
masculinity Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 96
matrons Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
metaliterariness Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 97
metellus macedonicus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
militarism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
mime, mimus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
minerva Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 98, 204
morality, moralistic language Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
morality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 98, 101, 115, 208
myron Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 97, 98, 99
myrrha Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 134, 135, 136, 137
niobe Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 96, 97, 98, 100
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 101
otium Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60, 61
palatine Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
palatine hill, augustan developments Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 329
palatine hill Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
paratexts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
parthenope (naples) Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60
paternalism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 95, 101
patronage Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 99
patrons, of literature Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
peace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93
perseus and andromeda Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
personification Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 98, 100
phaethon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
philemon and baucis Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 294
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 100, 204
pliny the elder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 98, 99
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 96, 101, 204
pompey, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
portico of apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
portico of livia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
portico of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
porticos Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 98
power, disciplinary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 100, 101
power structures, imperial power Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
presence/absence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 99, 100
priapus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
propertius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 115, 204, 208; Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
ptolemies Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
ptolemy ii philadelphus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213; Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 183
public and private lives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 93, 134, 204, 208
quinctius cincinnatus, l., (quin)decemuiri s.f. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
rape Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
reader response Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92
reading, active Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 101
reading, in error or ignorance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
recusatio Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 96, 99
religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 134
res publica, of readers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 134
return Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
revisionary, verbs of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
rivers Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
romance, venues for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 134, 135, 136, 137
rome Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
rome ara pacis, capitoline or mons tarpeius Welch, Tarpeia: Workings of a Roman Myth (2015) 198
saepta iulia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
sanctuary, of delphi Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 119
saturn Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
senate Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
senses, solstice Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
sexuality Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
sibyl, cumaean Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
sibylline books Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
signs and semiotics Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 208
silence Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 96, 98
slaves Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 115
spatiari (stroll) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 97, 208
stroll (spatiari) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 98
suetonius, divus augustus Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218
suetonius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 204
surveillance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93, 101
tarquinius Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
tarquinius superbus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
temple, as metaliterary devices Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93
temple, of apollo palatinus Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 119
temple Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 119
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 294, 329
temple of mars avenger Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 329
temples, on the palatine Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60, 61, 183
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 115, 134, 135, 136, 137
theatricality Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
tibullus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 63
tityrus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 60
triumphus Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 61
trojans Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
uates Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
underworld Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 94
vesta Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 213
victory (military) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 119
virgil Nuno et al., SENSORIVM: The Senses in Roman Polytheism (2021) 218; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 230
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 100, 208
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101
voice Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 92, 96, 98, 100
women Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 94, 95, 96, 97, 101
world' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 93
zanker, paul Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 95