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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9804
Propertius, Elegies, 1.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.529-9.599 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.529. /that were warriors, whenso furious wrath came upon any; won might they be by gifts, and turned aside by pleadings. Myself I bear in mind this deed of old days and not of yesterday, how it was; and I will tell it among you that are all my friends. The Curetes on a time were fighting and the Aetolians staunch in battle 9.530. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.531. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.532. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.533. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.534. /around the city of Calydon, and were slaying one another, the Aetolians defending lovely Calydon and the Curetes fain to waste it utterly in war. For upon their folk had Artemis of the golden throne sent a plague in wrath that Oeneus offered not to her the first-fruits of the harvest in his rich orchard land; 9.535. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.536. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.537. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.538. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. 9.539. /whereas the other gods feasted on hecatombs, and it was to the daughter of great Zeus alone that he offered not, whether haply he forgat, or marked it not; and he was greatly blinded in heart. Thereat the Archer-goddess, the child of Zeus, waxed wroth and sent against him a fierce wild boar, white of tusk 9.540. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.541. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.542. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.543. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.544. /that wrought much evil, wasting the orchard land of Oeneus; many a tall tree did he uproot and cast upon the ground, aye, root and apple blossom therewith. But the boar did Meleager, son of Oeneus, slay, when he had gathered out of many cities huntsmen 9.545. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.546. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.547. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.548. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.549. /and hounds; for not of few men could the boar have been slain, so huge was he; and many a man set he upon the grievous pyre. But about his body the goddess brought to pass much clamour and shouting concerning his head and shaggy hide, between the Curetes and the great-souled Aetolians. 9.550. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.551. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.552. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.553. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.554. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.555. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.556. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.557. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.558. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.559. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.560. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.561. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.562. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.563. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.564. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.565. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.566. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.567. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.568. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.569. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 9.570. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.571. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.572. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.573. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.574. /the while she knelt and made the folds of her bosom wet with tears, that they should bring death upon her son; and the Erinys that walketh in darkness heard her from Erebus, even she of the ungentle heart. Now anon was the din of the foemen risen about their gates, and the noise of the battering of walls, and to Meleager the elders 9.575. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.576. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.577. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.578. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.579. /of the Aetolians made prayer, sending to him the best of the priests of the gods, that he should come forth and succour them, and they promised him a mighty gift; they bade him, where the plain of lovely Calydon was fattest, there choose a fair tract of fifty acres, the half of it vineland 9.580. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.581. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.582. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.583. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. 9.584. /and the half clear plough-land, to be cut from out the plain. And earnestly the old horseman Oeneus besought him, standing upon the threshold of his high-roofed chamber, and shaking the jointed doors, in prayer to his son, and earnestly too did his sisters and his honoured mother beseech him 9.585. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.586. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.587. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.588. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.589. /—but he denied them yet more—and earnestly his companions that were truest and dearest to him of all; yet not even so could they persuade the heart in his breast, until at the last his chamber was being hotly battered, and the Curetes were mounting upon the walls and firing the great city. 9.590. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.591. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.592. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.593. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.594. /Then verily his fair-girdled wife besought Meleager with wailing, and told him all the woes that come on men whose city is taken; the men are slain and the city is wasted by fire, and their children and low-girdled women are led captive of strangers. 9.595. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.596. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.597. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.598. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil. 9.599. /Then was his spirit stirred, as he heard the evil tale, and he went his way and did on his body his gleaming armour. Thus did he ward from the Aetolians the day of evil, yielding to his own spirit; and to him thereafter they paid not the gifts, many and gracious; yet even so did he ward from them evil.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 23.11-23.24 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aristotle, Poetics, 7 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Callimachus, Hymn To Apollo, 106-113, 105 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Epodes, 11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Horace, Sermones, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.1. 1. In the former book, most honored Epaphroditus, I have demonstrated our antiquity, and confirmed the truth of what I have said, from the writings of the Phoenicians, and Chaldeans, and Egyptians. I have, moreover, produced many of the Grecian writers, as witnesses thereto. I have also made a refutation of Manetho and Cheremon, and of certain others of our enemies. 2.1. for in his third book, which relates to the affairs of Egypt, he speaks thus:—“I have heard of the ancient men of Egypt, that Moses was of Heliopolis, and that he thought himself obliged to follow the customs of his forefathers, and offered his prayers in the open air, towards the city walls; but that he reduced them all to be directed towards the sun-rising, which was agreeable to the situation of Heliopolis; 2.1. Or how is it possible that all the Jews should get together to these sacrifices, and the entrails of one man should be sufficient for so many thousands to taste of them, as Apion pretends? Or why did not the king carry this man, whosoever he was, and whatsoever was his name (which is not set down in Apion’s book)
7. Ovid, Amores, 1.15.1-1.15.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.89 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Ovid, Fasti, 3.603, 3.628-3.632, 3.643-3.644 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.603. That had been his dower, accompanied only by Achates 3.628. ‘Lavinia, my wife, I have a pious reason for entrusting 3.629. This lady to you: shipwrecked, I lived at her expense. 3.630. She’s of Tyrian birth: her kingdom’s on the Libyan shore: 3.631. I beg you to love her, as your dear sister.’ 3.632. Lavinia promised all, but hid a fancied wrong 3.643. To the ground: fear itself had made her daring. 3.644. With terror driving her, clothed in her loose vest
10. Propertius, Elegies, 1.1.11, 1.3.1-1.3.6, 1.3.35-1.3.38, 1.3.41, 1.7, 1.18, 2.1, 2.34, 2.34.91-2.34.94, 3.7.13, 3.18, 3.18.31-3.18.32, 4.2.3-4.2.4, 4.4.33-4.4.36, 4.4.55-4.4.58, 4.11.28 (1st cent. BCE

11. Tibullus, Elegies, 1.1, 1.1.1-1.1.4, 1.1.53-1.1.58, 1.2.60, 1.4.60, 2.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.1, 1.192, 1.196, 1.329, 1.498-1.502, 4.34, 4.38, 4.68, 4.450, 9.435-9.437, 9.444, 10.730, 11.648, 11.660, 11.875 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. Arms and the man I sing, who first made way 1.192. th' assembled clouds, and brought back light to heaven. 1.196. assists the task; then, from the sand-strewn shore 1.329. of the Liburni. Straight up stream he sailed 1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay 4.34. But may the earth gape open where I tread 4.38. before, O Chastity! I shall offend 4.68. how far may not our Punic fame extend 4.450. Because of thee yon Libyan savages 9.435. through midnight shades, to where their foemen lie 9.436. encamped in arms; of whom, before these fall 9.437. a host shall die. Along the turf were seen 9.444. “Now boldly strike. The hour to do the deed 10.730. in mortal shade; Serestus bore away 11.875. her chosen peers, Larina, virgin brave
13. Vergil, Eclogues, 6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
acontius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
acron Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
adonis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
adultery, mime Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
aeneas Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121, 216, 220
aesop Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
aetia, book 3, influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
aetiological aspects, influence Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
aetiology Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216
allusion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117, 118
anchises Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
ancilla Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216
anger Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
anna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216, 220
apollo Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 258
apollonius rhodius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
aratus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
ariadne Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
arma Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216
atalanta Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62, 117, 118, 121
augustan poetry Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 258
augustus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
bovillae, perenna Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216
callimacheanism, callimachean models, roman appropriation of Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
callimacheanism, roman Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
callimachus, and latin poets Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
callimachus, hecale Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
calypso Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
camilla Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
chloris Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
circe Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
corydon Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
cynthia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82, 216, 220
death, of vergil Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
deer Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
defixiones Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216
dementia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
departure Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
diana Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
dido Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117, 121, 216
eclogues Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 258
elegy, erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216, 220, 315
ennius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 118
envy Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
epic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117, 216, 315
epigraphs Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
epitaph Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
errare, error Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
euphorion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
euryalus, mother of Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
euryalus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
fame Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 118
gallus, cornelius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62, 117, 118, 220
germanicus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
ghosts Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
heracles, and hercules Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
hexameters Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
home Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
homer Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117, 118
horace Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 118
hunt(ing), erotic Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117, 118
hunt(ing) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62, 117, 118, 121
intertextuality, of latin poets and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
lament, and women Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
lament Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
lavinia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
lions Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62, 118
maenads Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
marcellus, death of Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
marcellus Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
marcus claudius marcellus Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
medea Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
meliboeus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
metapoetics, and criticism of latin poetry Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
milanion Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62, 117, 118, 220
militia amoris Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
mime, adultery mime Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
misenus Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
nisus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
nostalgia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
nostos Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
octavia Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
odysseus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
orpheus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
ovid, fasti Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
ovid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121, 315
parade of heroes' Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
paratexts Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
pasiphaë Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
pastoral, and elegy Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
patria Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
pentameter Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 315
phaedrus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
plato Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 118
poets, and callimachus Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
praeteritio Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 258
propertius Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526; Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 258; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62, 82, 117, 220
puella(e) Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62, 121, 216
recusatio Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 258
return Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
rome Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82, 117, 216
saturn Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
scythia Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
seruitium amoris Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
servius Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 117
shipwreck Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
solon Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 118
theognis Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 118
theseus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
tibullus Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 258; Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
tityrus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 82
underworld Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 62
venus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 121
vergil, aeneid Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 216, 315
vertumnus Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 220
virgil, aeneid Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 293
voice, poetic, in latin poets Acosta-Hughes Lehnus and Stephens, Brill's Companion to Callimachus (2011) 526
xenophon Keith and Myers, Vergil and Elegy (2023) 118