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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9775
Proclus, Hymni, 7.14
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 454-500, 889-900, 453 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

453. of her fear father, and Zeus gave her fame
2. Homer, Iliad, 21.240 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

21.240. /In terrible wise about Achilles towered the tumultuous wave, and the stream as it beat upon his shield thrust him backward, nor might he avail to stand firm upon his feet. Then grasped he an elm, shapely and tall, but it fell uprooted and tore away all the bank, and stretched over the fair streams
3. Homer, Odyssey, 5.262-5.493, 12.59-12.72 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.75.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.75.4.  As for Dionysus, the myths state that he discovered the vine and its cultivation, and also how to make wine and to store away many of the autumn fruits and thus to provide mankind with the use of them as food over a long time. This god was born in Crete, men say, of Zeus and Persephonê, and Orpheus has handed down the tradition in the initiatory rites that he was torn in pieces by the Titans. And the fact is that there have been several who bore the name Dionysus, regarding whom we have given a detailed account at greater length in connection with the more appropriate period of time.
5. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

35. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea ? For you are ii t the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wands and indulge in shoutings and movements exactly as do those who are under the spell of the Dionysiac ecstasies. Cf. Diodorus, i. 11. For the same reason many of the Greeks make statues of Dionysus in the form of a bull A partial list in Roscher, Lexikon d. gr. u. röm. Mythologie, i. 1149. ; and the women of Elis invoke him, praying that the god may come with the hoof of a bull Cf. Moralia, 299 a, where the invocation is given at greater length; also Edmonds, Lyra Graeca, iii. p. 510 (L.C.L.). ; and the epithet applied to Dionysus among the Argives is Son of the Bull. They call him up out of the water by the sound of trumpets, Cf. Moralia, 671 e. at the same time casting into the depths a lamb as an offering to the Keeper of the Gate. The trumpets they conceal in Bacchic wands, as Socrates Müller, Frag. Hist. Graec. iv. p. 498, Socrates, no. 5. has stated in his treatise on The Holy Ones. Furthermore, the tales regarding the Titans and the rites celebrated by night agree with the accounts of the dismemberment of Osiris and his revivification and regenesis. Similar agreement is found too in the tales about their sepulchres. The Egyptians, as has already been stated, 358 a and 359 a, supra . point out tombs of Osiris in many places, and the people of Delphi believe that the remains of Dionysus rest with them close beside the oracle; and the Holy Ones offer a secret sacrifice in the shrine of Apollo whenever the devotees of Dionysus That is, the inspired maidens, mentioned at the beginning of the chapter. wake the God of the Mystic Basket. Callimachus, Hymn to Demeter (vi.), 127; Anth. Pal. vi. 165; Virgil, Georg. i. 166. To show that the Greeks regard Dionysus as the lord and master not only of wine, but of the nature of every sort of moisture, it is enough that Pindar Frag. 153 (Christ). Plutarch quotes the line also in Moralia, 745 a and 757 f. be our witness, when he says May gladsome Dionysus swell the fruit upon the trees, The hallowed splendour of harvest-time. For this reason all who reverence Osiris are prohibited from destroying a cultivated tree or blocking up a spring of water. 35. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea? For you are at the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wands and indulge in shoutings and movements exactly as do those who are under the spell of the Dionysiac ecstasies. For the same reason many of the Greeks make statues of Dionysus in the form of a bull; and the women of Elis invoke him, praying that the god may come with the hoof of a bull; and the epithet applied to Dionysus among the Argives is "Son of the Bull." They call him up out of the water by the sound of trumpets, at the same time casting into the depths a lamb as an offering to the Keeper of the Gate. The trumpets they conceal in Bacchic wands, as Socrates has stated in his treatise on The Holy Ones. Furthermore, the tales regarding the Titans and the rites celebrated by night agree with the accounts of the dismemberment of Osiris and his revivification and regenesis. Similar agreement is found too in the tales about their sepulchres. The Egyptians, as has already been stated, point out tombs of Osiris in many places, and the people of Delphi believe that the remains of Dionysus rest with them close beside the oracle; and the Holy Ones offer a secret sacrifice in the shrine of Apollo whenever the devotees of Dionysus wake the God of the Mystic Basket. To show that the Greeks regard Dionysus as the lord and master not only of wine, but of the nature of every sort of moisture, it is enough that Pindar be our witness, when he says May gladsome Dionysus swell the fruit upon the trees, The hallowed splendour of harvest time. For this reason all who reverence Osiris are prohibited from destroying a cultivated tree or blocking up a spring of water.
6. Lucian, The Dance, 39 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.19 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

8. Julian (Emperor), Letters, 61 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

9. Julian (Emperor), Letters, 61 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

10. Julian (Emperor), Letters, 61 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

11. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 30 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

12. Proclus, Hymni, 3.3, 3.6, 7.1, 7.11-7.13, 7.15 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis (athens) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 395
addressee Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389, 395
allegory / allegorisation Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
athena Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 395, 408
chaldaean oracles Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 389
christianity / christians Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395
circe Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
city Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
contest between athena and poseidon Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 395
death Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389, 395
demiurge Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
dionysus, heart of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
dionysus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 389, 395, 408
edict / decree / law, julians edict against christian professors Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395
family, marriage and children Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
family Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
father, divine father Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 389, 408
giants, gigantomachy Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
grave Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
hephaistos (god) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
homer Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 395
homeric motifs Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389, 395, 408
hymn Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 389, 395, 408
intellectual / intellective / noeric gods Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
julian (emperor) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395
mysteries, phlyan Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
myth Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 395, 408
odysseus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389, 408
odyssey Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395, 408
oracle, chaldaean oracles Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
orphic lore Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395, 408
pagan / paganism Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395
passions (pathe) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
patroclus Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
piety (eusebeia) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
planctae Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
poseidon Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 395
prayer Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
proclus (neoplatonist) Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 389, 395, 408
quotation Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389, 395, 408
reader / readership Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347, 389
reception Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395
rose, h. j. Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199
sea Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389, 395, 408
semele Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
soul, immortality of the soul Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
statue Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
student Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 395
successor / succession Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
symbol Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
theology, platonic theology Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 347
theurgy / theurgic Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
titans Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 408
winds' Tanaseanu-Döbler and von Alvensleben, Athens II: Athens in Late Antiquity (2020) 389
zeus, gestates dionysus in his thigh Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 199