Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9698
Porphyry, On The Cave Of The Nymphs, 16


nanIn this cave, therefore, says Homer, all external possessions must be deposited. Here, naked, and assuming a suppliant habit, afflicted in body, casting aside everything superfluous, and being averse to the energies of sense, it is requisite to sit at the foot of the olive and consult with Minerva by what |39 means we may most effectually destroy that hostile rout of passions which insidiously lurk in the secret recesses of the soul. Indeed, as it appears to me, it was not without reason that Numenius and his followers thought the person of Ulysses in the Odyssey represented to us a man who passes in a reguIar manner over the dark and stormy sea of generation, and thus at length arrives at that region where tempests and seas are unknown, and finds a nation "Who ne'er knew salt, or heard the billows roar.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 798, 797 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

797. Great-souled Obriareus, Cottus and Gyes
2. Homer, Iliad, 5.385-5.391 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5.385. /So suffered Ares, when Otus and mighty Ephialtes, the sons of Aloeus, bound him in cruel bonds, and in a brazen jar he lay bound for thirteen months; and then would Ares, insatiate of war, have perished, had not the stepmother of the sons of Aloeus, the beauteous Eëriboea 5.386. /So suffered Ares, when Otus and mighty Ephialtes, the sons of Aloeus, bound him in cruel bonds, and in a brazen jar he lay bound for thirteen months; and then would Ares, insatiate of war, have perished, had not the stepmother of the sons of Aloeus, the beauteous Eëriboea 5.387. /So suffered Ares, when Otus and mighty Ephialtes, the sons of Aloeus, bound him in cruel bonds, and in a brazen jar he lay bound for thirteen months; and then would Ares, insatiate of war, have perished, had not the stepmother of the sons of Aloeus, the beauteous Eëriboea 5.388. /So suffered Ares, when Otus and mighty Ephialtes, the sons of Aloeus, bound him in cruel bonds, and in a brazen jar he lay bound for thirteen months; and then would Ares, insatiate of war, have perished, had not the stepmother of the sons of Aloeus, the beauteous Eëriboea 5.389. /So suffered Ares, when Otus and mighty Ephialtes, the sons of Aloeus, bound him in cruel bonds, and in a brazen jar he lay bound for thirteen months; and then would Ares, insatiate of war, have perished, had not the stepmother of the sons of Aloeus, the beauteous Eëriboea 5.390. /brought tidings unto Hermes; and he stole forth Ares, that was now sore distressed, for his grievous bonds were overpowering him. So suffered Hera, when the mighty son of Amphitryon smote her on the right breast with a three-barbed arrow; then upon her too came pain that might in no wise be assuaged. 5.391. /brought tidings unto Hermes; and he stole forth Ares, that was now sore distressed, for his grievous bonds were overpowering him. So suffered Hera, when the mighty son of Amphitryon smote her on the right breast with a three-barbed arrow; then upon her too came pain that might in no wise be assuaged.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 8.296-8.298 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Bacchae, 142 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

142. ῥεῖ δὲ γάλακτι πέδον, ῥεῖ δʼ οἴνῳ, ῥεῖ δὲ μελισσᾶν
5. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 146 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

7. Porphyry, Ad Gaurum, 2.2.9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

8. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.36 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.36. 36.The Pythagoreans, therefore, diligently applying themselves to the study of numbers and lines, sacrificed for the most part from these to the Gods, denominating, indeed, a certain number Minerva, but another Diana, and another Apollo: and again, they called one number justice, but another temperance 15. In diagrams also they adopted a similar mode. And thus, by offerings of this kind, they rendered the Gods propitious to them, so as to obtain of them the object of their wishes, by the things which they dedicated to, and the names by which they invoked them. They likewise frequently employed their aid in divination, and if they were in want of a certain thing for the purpose of some investigation. In order, therefore to affect this, they made use of the Gods within the heavens, both the erratic and non-erratic, of all of whom it is requisite to consider the sun as the leader; but to rank the moon in the second place; and we should conjoin with these fire, in the third place, from its |66 alliance to them, as the theologist 16 says. He also says that no animal is to be sacrificed; but that first-fruits are to be offered from meal and honey, and the vegetable productions of the earth. He adds, that fire is not to be enkindled on a hearth defiled with gore; and asserts other things of the like kind. For what occasion is there to transcribe all he says? For he who is studious of piety knows, indeed, that to the Gods no animal is to be sacrificed, but that a sacrifice of this kind pertains to daemons, and other powers, whether they are beneficent, or depraved1. He likewise knows who those are that ought to sacrifice to these, and to what extent they ought to proceed in the sacrifices which they make. Other things, however, will be passed over by me in silence. But what some Platonists have divulged, I shall lay before the reader, in order that the things proposed to be discussed, may become manifest to the intelligent. What they have unfolded, therefore, is as follows: SPAN
9. Porphyry, On The Cave of The Nymphs, 17-18, 29, 7, 15 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

15. One particular, however, remains to be explained, and that is the symbol of the olive planted at the top of the cavern, since Homer appears to indicate something very admirable by giving it such a position. For he does not merely say that an olive grows in this place, but that it flourishes on the summit of the cavern. "High at the head a branching olive grows, Beneath, a gloomy grotto s cool recess.." But the growth of the olive in such a situation is not fortuitous, as some one may suspect, but contains the enigma of the cavern. For |37 since the world was not produced rashly and casually, but is the work of divine wisdom and an intellectual nature; hence an olive, the symbol of this wisdom flourishes near the present cavern, which is an image of the world. For the olive is the plant of Minerva, and Minerva is wisdom. But this Goddess being produced from the head of Jupiter, the theologist has discovered an appropriate place for the olive by consecrating it at the summit of the port; signifying by this that the universe is not the effect of a casual event and the work of irrational fortune, but that it is the offspring of an intellectual nature and divine wisdom, which is separated indeed from it (by a difference of essence), but yet is near to it, through being established on the summit of the whole port (i.e., from the dignity and excellence of its nature governing the whole with consummate wisdom). Since, however, an olive is ever-flourishing, it possesses a certain peculiarity in the highest degree adapted to the revolutions of souls in the world, for to such souls this cave (as we have said) is sacred. For in summer the white leaves of the olive tend upwards, but in winter the whiter leaves are bent downward. On |38 this account also in prayers and supplications, men extend the branches of an olive, ominating from this that they shall exchange the sorrowful darkness of danger for the fair light of security and peace. The olive, therefore being naturally ever-flourishing, bears fruit which is the auxiliary of labour (by being its reward, it is sacred to Minerva; supplies the victors in athletic labours with crowns and affords a friendly branch to the suppliant petitioner. Thus, too, the world is governed by an intellectual nature, and is conducted by a wisdom eternal and ever-flourishing; by which the rewards of victory are conferred on the conquerors in the athletic race of life, as the reward of severe toil and patient perseverance. And the Demiurgus who connects and contains the world (in ineffable comprehensions) invigorates miserable and suppliant souls.
10. Proclus, Theologia Platonica ( ), 1.5 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

11. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 149

12. Pseudo-Tertullian, Martyrdom of Perpetua And Felicitas, 4.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(mithraic) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
allegory deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
anatolia n de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
animals, donkey Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 289
avesta, old Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
baptism McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 112
binding, of statues Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
body Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 26
castration de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
celsus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
chained images Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
christianity Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
cosmogony de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
cosmology de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
cosmos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
cult images, and mobility Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
cumont, franz Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
death Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 26
derveni papyrus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
descent/ascent Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 26
desire / lust Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 289
dionysus, cult of McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 112
divinity, and mobility Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
drinking / drinking parties Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 289
eucharistia/eucharist, with milk and honey McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 112
frescoes Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
gordon, richard Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
gregory of akragas, pseudo Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 289
hephaistos Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
hera Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
hittite, myth, literature de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
honey de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
imaginaire Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
initiation Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
initiators deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
joseph and aseneth McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 112
kronos Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
kumarbi de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
leo Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
light Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 26
luna (mithraic) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
marriage Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
milk, and honey' McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 112
mithraic Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
mithraic grades Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
mithras, cult of McGowan, Ascetic Eucharists: Food and Drink in Early Christian Ritual Meals (1999) 112
mithras Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
mobility Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
movement, leaping / saltare Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 289
mysteries Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 26
myth Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
nature Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
orphic, see titans, zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
ouranos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
paganism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
pantheon de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
peratic Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 26
phallus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
planets Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
plutarch Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
rites deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
rome, mithraeum of santa prisca Belayche and Massa, Mystery Cults in Visual Representation in Graeco-Roman Antiquity (2021) 36
semitic de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
sexual intercourse / sexual penetration, general Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 289
shame / shamelessness Gazzarri and Weiner, Searching for the Cinaedus in Ancient Rome (2023) 289
sky de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
sol, ; as cosmic emblem in mithraism Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
statues, binding of Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
sun de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
syncretism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
telete deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
theogony de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
theomachy Steiner, Images in Mind: Statues in Archaic and Classical Greek Literature and Thought (2001) 162
turcan, r. Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
tutela (of women, minors etc.), ; mithraic Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
wine, wine-god de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99
yaš Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79
zeus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 99; deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 85
zodiac Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 79; Bull, Lied and Turner, Mystery and Secrecy in the Nag Hammadi Collection and Other Ancient Literature: Ideas and Practices: Studies for Einar Thomassen at Sixty (2011) 26