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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9717
Porphyry, Life Of Pythagoras, 6


nanAs to his knowledge, it is said that he learned the mathematical sciences from the Egyptians, Chaldeans and Phoenicians; for of' old the Egyptians excelled, in geometry, the Phoenicians in numbers and proportions, and the Chaldeans of astronomical theorems, divine rites, and worship of the Gods; other secrets concerning the course of life he received and learned from the Magi.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Empedocles, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Herodotus, Histories, 4.95 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.95. I understand from the Greeks who live beside the Hellespont and Pontus, that this Salmoxis was a man who was once a slave in Samos, his master being Pythagoras son of Mnesarchus; ,then, after being freed and gaining great wealth, he returned to his own country. Now the Thracians were a poor and backward people, but this Salmoxis knew Ionian ways and a more advanced way of life than the Thracian; for he had consorted with Greeks, and moreover with one of the greatest Greek teachers, Pythagoras; ,therefore he made a hall, where he entertained and fed the leaders among his countrymen, and taught them that neither he nor his guests nor any of their descendants would ever die, but that they would go to a place where they would live forever and have all good things. ,While he was doing as I have said and teaching this doctrine, he was meanwhile making an underground chamber. When this was finished, he vanished from the sight of the Thracians, and went down into the underground chamber, where he lived for three years, ,while the Thracians wished him back and mourned him for dead; then in the fourth year he appeared to the Thracians, and thus they came to believe what Salmoxis had told them. Such is the Greek story about him.
3. Isocrates, Busiris, 28 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Plato, Hipparchus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

228c. they still do now. He dispatched a fifty-oared galley for Anacreon of Teos, and brought him into our city. Simonides of Ceos he always had about him, prevailing on him by plenteous fees and gifts. All this he did from a wish to educate the citizens, in order that he might have subjects of the highest excellence; for he thought it not right to grudge wisdom to any, so noble and good was he. And when his people in the city had been educated and were admiring him for his wisdom
5. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

600b. and transmitted to posterity a certain Homeric way of life just as Pythagoras was himself especially honored for this, and his successors, even to this day, denominating a certain way of life the Pythagorean, are distinguished among their contemporaries? No, nothing of this sort either is reported; for Creophylos, Socrates, the friend of Homer, would perhaps be even more ridiculous than his name as a representative of Homeric culture and education, if what is said about Homer is true. For the tradition is that Homer was completely neglected in his own lifetime by that friend of the flesh.
6. Ennius, Annales, 15 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

7. Strabo, Geography, 7.3.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.3.5. In fact, it is said that a certain man of the Getae, Zamolxis by name, had been a slave to Pythagoras, and had learned some things about the heavenly bodies from him, as also certain other things from the Egyptians, for in his wanderings he had gone even as far as Egypt; and when he came on back to his home-land he was eagerly courted by the rulers and the people of the tribe, because he could make predictions from the celestial signs; and at last he persuaded the king to take him as a partner in the government, on the ground that he was competent to report the will of the gods; and although at the outset he was only made a priest of the god who was most honored in their country, yet afterwards he was even addressed as god, and having taken possession of a certain cavernous place that was inaccessible to anyone else he spent his life there, only rarely meeting with any people outside except the king and his own attendants; and the king cooperated with him, because he saw that the people paid much more attention to himself than before, in the belief that the decrees which he promulgated were in accordance with the counsel of the gods. This custom persisted even down to our own time, because some man of that character was always to be found, who, though in fact only a counsellor to the king, was called god among the Getae. And the people took up the notion that the mountain was sacred and they so call it, but its name is Cogaeonum, like that of the river which flows past it. So, too, at the time when Byrebistas, against whom already the Deified Caesar had prepared to make an expedition, was reigning over the Getae, the office in question was held by Decaeneus, and somehow or other the Pythagorean doctrine of abstention from eating any living thing still survived as taught by Zamolxis.
8. New Testament, Acts, 24.14 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24.14. But this I confess to you, that after the Way, which they call a sect, so I serve the God of our fathers, believing all things which are according to the law, and which are written in the prophets;
9. New Testament, John, 14.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.6. Jesus said to him, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father, except through me.
10. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.2-8.3 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.2. From Samos he went, it is said, to Lesbos with an introduction to Pherecydes from his uncle Zoilus. He had three silver flagons made and took them as presents to each of the priests of Egypt. He had brothers, of whom Eunomus was the elder and Tyrrhenus the second; he also had a slave, Zamolxis, who is worshipped, so says Herodotus, by the Getans, as Cronos. He was a pupil, as already stated, of Pherecydes of Syros, after whose death he went to Samos to be the pupil of Hermodamas, Creophylus's descendant, a man already advanced in years. While still young, so eager was he for knowledge, he left his own country and had himself initiated into all the mysteries and rites not only of Greece but also of foreign countries. 8.3. Now he was in Egypt when Polycrates sent him a letter of introduction to Amasis; he learnt the Egyptian language, so we learn from Antiphon in his book On Men of Outstanding Merit, and he also journeyed among the Chaldaeans and Magi. Then while in Crete he went down into the cave of Ida with Epimenides; he also entered the Egyptian sanctuaries, and was told their secret lore concerning the gods. After that he returned to Samos to find his country under the tyranny of Polycrates; so he sailed away to Croton in Italy, and there he laid down a constitution for the Italian Greeks, and he and his followers were held in great estimation; for, being nearly three hundred in number, so well did they govern the state that its constitution was in effect a true aristocracy (government by the best).
11. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 14, 146, 15, 19, 13 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

13. Moreover, if we may believe in so many ancient and credible historians as have written concerning him, the words of Pythagoras contained something of a recalling and admonitory nature, which extended as far as to irrational animals; by which it may be inferred that learning predominates in those endued with intellect, since it tames even wild beasts, and those which are considered to be deprived of reason. For it is said that Pythagoras detained the Daunian bear which had most severely injured the inhabitants, and that having gently stroked it with his hand for a long time, fed it with maze and acorns, and compelled it by an oath no longer to touch any living thing, he dismissed it. But the bear immediately after hid herself in the mountains and woods, and was never seen from that time to attack any irrational animal. Perceiving likewise an ox at Tarentum feeding in a pasture, and eating among other things green beans, he advised the herdsman to tell the ox to abstain from the beans. The herdsman, however, laughed at him, and said that he did not understand the language of oxen, but if Pythagoras did, it was in vain to advise him to speak to the ox, but fit that he himself should advise the animal to abstain from such food. Pythagoras therefore, approaching to 41the ear of the ox, and whispering in it for a long time, not only caused him then to refrain from beans, but it is said that he never after tasted them. This ox also lived for a long time at Tarentum near the temple of Juno, where it remained when it was old, and was called the sacred ox of Pythagoras. It was also fed by those that came to it with human food. When likewise he happened to be conversing with his familiars about birds, symbols, and prodigies, and was observing that all these are the messengers of the Gods, sent by them to those men who are truly dear to the Gods, he is said to have brought down an eagle that was flying over Olympia, and after gently stroking, to have dismissed it. Through these things, therefore, and other things similar to these, he demonstrated that he possessed the same dominion as Orpheus, over savage animals, and that he allured and detained them by the power of voice proceeding from the mouth.
12. Porphyry, Philosophy From Oracles, 324 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

13. Porphyry, Life of Pythagoras, 11-12, 2, 1 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

1. Many think that Pythagoras was the son of Mnesarchus, but they differ as to the latter's race; some thinking him a Samian, while Neanthes, in the fifth book of his Fables states he was a Syrian, from the city of Tyre. As a famine had arisen in Samos, Mnesarchus went thither to trade, and was naturalized there. There also was born his son Pythagoras, who early manifested studiousness, but was later taken to Tyre, and there entrusted to the Chaldeans, whose doctrines he imbibed. Thence he returned to Ionia, where he first studied under the Syrian Pherecydes, then also under Hermodamas the Creophylian who at that time was an old man residing in Samos. SPAN
14. Marinus, Vita Proclus, 17.25 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

15. Olympiodorus The Younger of Alexandria, In Platonis Gorgiam Commentaria, 181.17-181.24 (6th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

16. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aethalides Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
chaldean DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
cosmology, pythagorean Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 570
delatte, a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90
diogenes laertius Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
empedocles Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
ennius Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
eudoxus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
euphorbus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
eusebius of caesarea DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
friendship (philia), pythagorean Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 570
friendship (philia) Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 570
gemelli marciano, m. l. Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 570
greek DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
harmony, in pythagoreanism Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 570
hecataeus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90
heraclitus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90
hipparchus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90
huffman, c.a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90, 168
iamblichus, as source for pythagoreanism Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 570
iamblichus DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
macris, c. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90
onomacritus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90
oracles DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
papyri graecae magicae (pgm) DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
plato Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90, 168; DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
porphyry Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
pythagoras Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90, 168; Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 323
pythagoreanism xxv, and friendship Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 570
riedweg, c. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90
skutsch, o. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 168
thracians Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 323
universal way of salvation DeMarco,, Augustine and Porphyry: A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10 (2021) 282
zeller, e.' Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 90