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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9645
Polybius, Histories, 38.6


nan And this, I think, is why the most thoughtful of the ancient writers were in the habit of giving their readers a rest in the way I say, some of them employing digressions dealing with myth or story and others digressions on matters of fact; so that not only do they shift the scene from one part of Greece to another, but include doings abroad. <, For instance, when dealing with the Thessalian affairs and the exploits of Alexander of Pherae, they interrupt the narrative to tell us of the projects of the Lacedaemonians in the Peloponnese or of those of the Athenians and of what happened in Macedonia or Illyria, and after entertaining us so tell us of the expedition of Iphicrates to Egypt and the excesses committed by Clearchus in Pontus. <, So that you will find that all historians have resorted to this device but have done so irregularly, while I myself resort to it regularly. <, For the authors I allude to, after mentioning how Bardyllis, the king of Illyria, and Cersobleptes, the king of Thrace, acquired their kingdoms, do not give us the continuation or carry us on to what proved to be the sequel after a certain lapse of time, but after inserting these matters as a sort of patch, return to their original subject. <, But I myself, keeping distinct all the most important parts of the world and the events that took place in each, and adhering always to a uniform conception of how each matter should be treated, and again definitely relating under each year the contemporary events that then took place, leave obviously full liberty to students to carry back their minds to the continuous narrative and the several points at which I interrupted it, so that those who wish to learn may find none of the matters I have mentioned imperfect and deficient. <, This is all I have to say on the subject. II. The Third Punic War <


nan1.  And this, I think, is why the most thoughtful of the ancient writers were in the habit of giving their readers a rest in the way I say, some of them employing digressions dealing with myth or story and others digressions on matters of fact; so that not only do they shift the scene from one part of Greece to another, but include doings abroad.,2.  For instance, when dealing with the Thessalian affairs and the exploits of Alexander of Pherae, they interrupt the narrative to tell us of the projects of the Lacedaemonians in the Peloponnese or of those of the Athenians and of what happened in Macedonia or Illyria, and after entertaining us so tell us of the expedition of Iphicrates to Egypt and the excesses committed by Clearchus in Pontus.,3.  So that you will find that all historians have resorted to this device but have done so irregularly, while I myself resort to it regularly.,4.  For the authors I allude to, after mentioning how Bardyllis, the king of Illyria, and Cersobleptes, the king of Thrace, acquired their kingdoms, do not give us the continuation or carry us on to what proved to be the sequel after a certain lapse of time, but after inserting these matters as a sort of patch, return to their original subject.,5.  But I myself, keeping distinct all the most important parts of the world and the events that took place in each, and adhering always to a uniform conception of how each matter should be treated, and again definitely relating under each year the contemporary events that then took place, leave obviously full liberty to students to carry back their minds to the continuous narrative and the several points at which I interrupted it, so that those who wish to learn may find none of the matters I have mentioned imperfect and deficient.,7.  This is all I have to say on the subject. II. The Third Punic War


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Polybius, Histories, 1.3.3-1.3.4, 1.4.7-1.4.9, 1.4.11, 3.32.1-3.32.5, 8.11.3-8.11.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

3.32.1.  For this reason I must pronounce those to be much mistaken who think that this my work is difficult to acquire and difficult to read owing to the number and length of the Books it contains. 3.32.2.  How much easier it is to acquire and peruse forty Books, all as it were connected by one thread, and thus to follow clearly events in Italy, Sicily, and Libya from the time of Pyrrhus to the capture of Carthage 3.32.3.  and those in the rest of the world from the flight of Cleomenes of Sparta on till the battle of the Romans and Achaeans at the Isthmus, than to read or procure the works of those who treat of particular transactions. 3.32.4.  Apart from their being many times as long as my history, readers cannot gather anything with certainty from them, firstly because most of them give different accounts of the same matter 3.32.5.  and next because they omit those contemporary events by a comparative review and estimation of which we can assign its true value to everything much more surely than by judging from particulars; and, finally, because it is out of their power even to touch on what is most essential. 8.11.3.  Again, no one could approve of the general scheme of this writer. Having set himself the task of writing the history of Greece from the point at which Thucydides leaves off, just when he was approaching the battle of Leuctra and the most brilliant period of Greek history, he abandoned Greece and her efforts, and changing his plan decided to write the history of Philip. 8.11.4.  Surely it would have been much more dignified and fairer to include Philip's achievements in the history of Greece than to include the history of Greece in that of Philip.
2. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.3.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.3.8.  The reason for this is that, in the first place, it is not easy for those who propose to go through the writings of so many historians to procure the books which come to be needed, and, in the second place, that, because the works vary so widely and are so numerous, the recovery of past events becomes extremely difficult of comprehension and of attainment; whereas, on the other hand, the treatise which keeps within the limits of a single narrative and contains a connected account of events facilitates the reading and contains such recovery of the past in a form that is perfectly easy to follow. In general, a history of this nature must be held to surpass all others to the same degree as the whole is more useful than the part and continuity than discontinuity, and, again, as an event whose date has been accurately determined is more useful than one of which it is not known in what period it happened.
3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, On Thucydides, 9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 3.13-3.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Lucian, How To Write History, 55 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
athenian archon list, as dating mechanism Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
callimachus Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
coherence (narrative) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
digression Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
diodorus of sicily Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
dionysius of halicarnassus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
dionysus. see nonnus, dionysiaca, discontinuity, aesthetics of Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
eratosthenes Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
greco-roman culture, universal histories and simultaneity Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
herodotus, history of historiography and Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
herodotus Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
hippolytus of rome, historiography, history of Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
historiography Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
livy Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
lucian Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
olympiads, as dating mechanism Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
parallelism (narrative) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
pleasure (in historiography) Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
polybius, history Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
polybius Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
praise Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
readers, pleasure Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
simultaneity and synchronicity, classical universal histories and local history Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
simultaneity and synchronicity Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
speech(es)' Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
tacitus Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
thucydides, simultaneity, problem of Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
thucydides Chrysanthou, Reconfiguring the Imperial Past: Narrative Patterns and Historical Interpretation in Herodian’s History of the Empire (2022) 314
time Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139
translatio imperii Goldhill, The Christian Invention of Time: Temporality and the Literature of Late Antiquity (2022) 139